Student Success

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Who are gifted and talented students and are they always successful?

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Student Success

  1. 1. Who are the Gifted and talented students, and are they always successful?
  2. 2. <ul><li>There are different profiles of gifted and talented learners </li></ul><ul><li>Giftedness involves more than just high IQ scores </li></ul><ul><li>Gifted and talented learners do not always succeed at school </li></ul>
  3. 3. <ul><li>1. The High Achiever </li></ul><ul><li>2. The Challenger (usually creative) </li></ul><ul><li>3. The Underground student (who tries to hide their giftedness) </li></ul><ul><li>4. The Dropout (the classic underachiever) </li></ul><ul><li>5. The Double Labelled (physical, emotional or learning difficulty) </li></ul><ul><li>6. The Autonomous learner </li></ul>
  4. 4. <ul><li>Definition of giftedness </li></ul><ul><li>When is gifted, ‘Gifted’? - Arbitrariness of selection criteria </li></ul><ul><li>'Gifted' generally refers to the top 5% of the school population in academic subjects and 'talented' to the top 5% in other subjects. (National Literacy Trust, 2009) </li></ul><ul><li>Multiple intelligence theory versus traditional IQ definition </li></ul>
  5. 5. <ul><li>Impact on students </li></ul><ul><li>Research findings overwhelmingly suggest that homogeneous grouping DOES NOT consistently help anyone learn more or better (Massachusetts Advocacy Centre, 1990; Thousand, Villa & Nevin cited in Sapon-Shevin, 2002, p. 38) </li></ul><ul><li>Organising children into high, average and low ability groups actually creates differences in what children learn by exposing them to different kinds of material. (Sapon-Shevin, 2002, p. 38-39) </li></ul>
  6. 6. <ul><li>‘ gifted students often resist doing their assigned work because it does not provide the challenge and sense of accomplishment of meeting that challenge, that would keep them motivated to work’. </li></ul><ul><li>(AHISA, 2001) </li></ul>
  7. 7. <ul><li>Questioning </li></ul><ul><li>Explicit modelling </li></ul><ul><li>Feedback </li></ul><ul><li>Cooperative learning </li></ul><ul><li>Alternative assessments </li></ul><ul><li>Pre-testing </li></ul>
  8. 8. <ul><li>Posing opened ended questions that require higher thinking. </li></ul><ul><li>Modelling thinking strategies, such as decision making and evaluation. </li></ul><ul><li>Accepting ideas from students and expanding them. </li></ul><ul><li>Facilitating original and independent problems and solutions. </li></ul><ul><li>Helping students identify rules, principles and relationships. </li></ul><ul><li>Taking time to explain your errors </li></ul>
  9. 9. <ul><li>Gifted children are those who do things a little earlier, a little faster, a little better and probably a little differently from most other children (Education Queensland, 1993) </li></ul>
  10. 10. <ul><li>Association of Heads of Independent Schools in Australia. (2001). Submission to the Senate Inquiry into the Education of Gifted and Talented Children. [electronic resource]. Retrieved July 31, 2009 from www.aph.gov.au/senate/Committee/eet_ctte/.../gifted/.../sub034.doc </li></ul><ul><li>Bevan-Brown, </li></ul><ul><li>Education Queensland. (2004). Framework for Gifted Education. [electronic resource]. Retrieved July 26, 2009 from education.qld.gov.au/publication/production/.../giftedandtalfwrk.pdf </li></ul><ul><li>Education Queensland. (2007). Gifted and Talented Students - Action plan 2008-2010. [electronic resource]. Retrieved July 26, 2009 from education.qld.gov.au/publication/.../giftedandtal-actionplan.pdf </li></ul><ul><li>Johnson and Ryser, </li></ul><ul><li>Meisenberg, G. (2003) IQ Population Genetics: It’s not as simple as you think. [electronic resource] Retrieved August 2, 2009 from http://www.mankindquarterly.org/winter2003_meisenberg.pdf </li></ul><ul><li>National Literacy Trust Website. (2009). http://www.literacytrust.org.uk/database/able.html </li></ul><ul><li>Sapon-Shevin, M. (1999.) Because we can change the world: a practical guide to building cooperative, inclusive classroom communities. Boston: Allyn & Bacon </li></ul><ul><li>Vasilevska, 2003 </li></ul>

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