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Instructions pediatric doses
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Instructions pediatric doses

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  • 1. InstructionsKnow These:1 milliliter (mL)=1 cubic centimeter (cc) 1 teaspoon (tsp)= 5 milliliters (mL)1000 milliliters (mL)= 1 Liter (L) 3 teaspoon (tsp)= 1 tablespoon (Tbsp)1000 micrograms (mcg)= 1 milligram (mg) 2 tablespoons (Tbsp)= 1 ounce (oz)1000 Grams (G)= 1 Kilogram (Kg) 30 milliliters (mL)= 1 ounce (oz)1000 milligrams (mg)= 1 Gram (G) 2.2 pounds (lb)= 1 Kilogram (Kg)Calculating dosages1 Consult a pediatric drug reference guide for information on dosage (see References for a sourceproviding a list of guides). Note whether the drug is one where dosage is calculated based on weight,BSA or age.2 Determine the patients age, weight in kilograms (children) or grams (infants), and height incentimeters. If your scale only provides weight in pounds, convert to kilograms by dividing the weight inpounds by 2.2. For children under 1, convert to grams by dividing the kilogram value by 1,000. If yourscale only provides height in inches, convert to centimeters by multiplying the height in inches by 2.54.3 If the drug is one where dosage is calculated by weight, multiply the patients weight by the dosagelisted in the drug guide. For example, for a child weighing 10 kg taking a drug with a recommendeddosage of 20 mg/kg/day, the daily dosage would be 10 kg x 20 mg/kg/day = 200 mg/day. 4 If the drug is one where dosage is calculated by BSA, multiply the patients height by his or herweight. Divide the result by 3,600. Take the square root of the result. Finally, multiply the result by thedosage listed in the drug guide. For example, for a child whose weight is 20 kg and whose height is 100cm taking a medication with a recommended dosage of 2 mg/m2/day, the daily dosage would be: 20 x100 = 2,000; 2,000/3,600 = 0.55; √0.55 = 0.74; 0.74 m2 x 2 mg/m2/day = 1.48 mg/day. 5 If the drug is one for which dosage is calculated by age, multiply the patients age by the dosagelisted in the drug guide. Age is measured in years, months or days, as determined by the recommendeddosage. For example, for a 6-year-old child taking a medication with a recommended dosage of 1mg/years of age/day, the daily dosage would be 6 mg/day.
  • 2. 6 Divide the daily dosage by the number of doses to be given per day. For example, if a medicationwith a recommended dosage of 4 mg/day is to be given twice per day, the dose for each administrationof the drug would be 2 mg.7 Divide the dose by its concentration to calculate the dose in milliliters. Pediatric drugs are usuallydispensed at a predetermined concentration. For example, for a drug administered in 2-mg doses andprepared in a 1-mg/mL concentration, each dose would be 1 mL.

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