Tools and Methods
SoWhat?
!
!
18 March 2014
Objectives
‣ Take a look at where we’ve been;
‣ Talk about going forward;
‣ Discuss larger research trajectories.
A Few Foundation Frameworks
‣ GraphViz
‣ R Programming Language
‣ JIT (JavaScript Infovis
Toolkit)
‣ Protovis
‣ D3
‣ Proce...
GraphViz
‣ An Open Source

Framework
‣ Mature (1988)
‣ AT&T Labs
‣ Used as a basis for subsequent
‣ A great prototyping an...
R Programming Language
‣ Geared towards statistical analysis
‣ In recent times has had developed into an engine
supporting...
JavaScript InfoVis Toolkit (JIT)
‣ JIT Demos (http://thejit.org/demos/)
‣ The JavaScript InfoVis Toolkit is a complete set...
JavaScript InfoVis Toolkit (JIT)
JavaScript InfoVis Toolkit (JIT)
JavaScript InfoVis Toolkit (JIT)
ProtoVis
‣ Protovis is a visualization toolkit for JavaScript using SVG.
It takes a graphical approach to data visualizati...
ProtoVis
http://mbostock.github.com/protovis/ex/crimea-rose.html
ProtoVis
http://mbostock.github.com/protovis/ex/napoleon.html
D3
‣ D3 allows you to bind arbitrary data to a Document
Object Model (DOM), and then apply data-driven
transformations to ...
D3
http://www.visualizing.org/full-screen/16266
Processing
‣ Now we are getting serious...
‣ Ben Fry
‣ Like R has a serious statistical bent
‣ Has a client and developmen...
Open Processing
Processing.js
Processing.js
http://nytlabs.com/projects/cascade.html
Tableau
‣ Commercial
‣ Offers a Free Public Application
‣ Encourages sharing and focusses on building a narrative around
v...
Tableau
http://www.tableausoftware.com/public
Prefuse
‣ flare.prefuse
‣ Flash-based
‣ Great transitions and very approachable
‣ Beware of Datalocking
‣ http://flare.pre...
Gephi
‣ We Looked at it two weeks ago
‣ Open Source
‣ Mapping andVisualising Relationships and Networks
‣ An outstandingVi...
Points of Departure
‣ DIRT (Digital Research Tools)
‣ Visualisation in Education
!
‣ Getting Started with R
‣ Using R in D...
"If you are not making anything, 

you are not…a digital humanist."
!
- Stephen Ramsay
Considering the state of things:
!
"Sample on Building versus Sharing"
Sample
‣ Production versus Reproduction of Knowledge
‣ The promise of the digital is not in the way it allows us to ask ne...
Digital Arts and Humanities Communities of Practise?
Type 1: Humanities computing subfield, work with computers dating bac...
mix, match, mash, manifest
1st wave of digital work was quantitative,
mobilizing the search and retrieval powers
of the database, automating corpus
l...
The second wave is qualitative,
interpretive, experiential, emotive,
generative in character.
Interdisciplinarity/transdisciplinarity/multidisciplinarity are
empty words ( ) unless they imply changes in language,
pra...
The digital is the realm of the :

open source, open resources - 4M
Digital Humanities implies the multi‐purposing and multiple
channeling of humanistic knowledge
Digital Humanities = Big Humanities = Generative
Humanities
by emphasizing design, multimediality, and the experiential,
it seeks to expand the compass of the affective range to
whic...
Process is the new god; not product. Anything that stands in
the way of the perpetual mash‐up and remix stands in the
way ...
Wiki‐scholarship is
iterative, cumulative, and collaborative
Digital Humanists recognize curation as a central feature of
the future of the Humanities disciplines
!
It recasts the sch...
Moving Forward
Selling A DAH Project
1. Have a Concrete Idea.
1. Find a few successful project models of what you want to do
in order to ...
Selling A DAH Project
2. Get the Facts.
If some of your ideas come under attack, you should be
prepared to defend them if ...
Selling A DAH Project
3. Do It. 

Moving from planning to learning and doing can be the
greatest challenge, but if you get...
ThankYou and Be In Touch
shawn.day@ucc.ie @iridium
Sharing  - Collecting our DAH Thoughts
Sharing  - Collecting our DAH Thoughts
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Sharing - Collecting our DAH Thoughts

  1. 1. Tools and Methods SoWhat? ! ! 18 March 2014
  2. 2. Objectives ‣ Take a look at where we’ve been; ‣ Talk about going forward; ‣ Discuss larger research trajectories.
  3. 3. A Few Foundation Frameworks ‣ GraphViz ‣ R Programming Language ‣ JIT (JavaScript Infovis Toolkit) ‣ Protovis ‣ D3 ‣ Processing ‣ Tableau ‣ Prefuse ‣ Gephi ‣ WEAVE (http:// www.oicweave.org/) ! ‣ Exhibit
  4. 4. GraphViz ‣ An Open Source
 Framework ‣ Mature (1988) ‣ AT&T Labs ‣ Used as a basis for subsequent ‣ A great prototyping and starting point ! ! ‣ http://www.graphviz.org/
  5. 5. R Programming Language ‣ Geared towards statistical analysis ‣ In recent times has had developed into an engine supporting some powerful graphics frameworks ‣ Open Source ‣ Typically Command Line but a variety of GUI editors available ‣ > Jeff Rydberg-Cox: R for the Digital Humanities
  6. 6. JavaScript InfoVis Toolkit (JIT) ‣ JIT Demos (http://thejit.org/demos/) ‣ The JavaScript InfoVis Toolkit is a complete set of tools to create Interactive DataVisualizations for theWeb. It includes JSON loading, animation, 2D point and graph classes and some predefined tree visualization methods. ‣ Smaller datasets in a clean form ‣ Related and Aggregated/Categorised Data
  7. 7. JavaScript InfoVis Toolkit (JIT)
  8. 8. JavaScript InfoVis Toolkit (JIT)
  9. 9. JavaScript InfoVis Toolkit (JIT)
  10. 10. ProtoVis ‣ Protovis is a visualization toolkit for JavaScript using SVG. It takes a graphical approach to data visualization, composing custom views of data with simple graphical primitives like bars and dots. These primitives are called marks, and each mark encodes data visually through dynamic properties such as color and position. ‣ Jerome Cukier: ProtoVis Tutorial ‣ Development shifted to D3 ‣ ProtoVis still very accessible and usable
  11. 11. ProtoVis http://mbostock.github.com/protovis/ex/crimea-rose.html
  12. 12. ProtoVis http://mbostock.github.com/protovis/ex/napoleon.html
  13. 13. D3 ‣ D3 allows you to bind arbitrary data to a Document Object Model (DOM), and then apply data-driven transformations to the document. As a trivial example, you can use D3 to generate a basic HTML table from an array of numbers. Or, use the same data to create an interactive SVG bar chart with smooth transitions and interaction. ‣ Open Source
  14. 14. D3 http://www.visualizing.org/full-screen/16266
  15. 15. Processing ‣ Now we are getting serious... ‣ Ben Fry ‣ Like R has a serious statistical bent ‣ Has a client and development environment, but deploys easily to the web using processing.js ‣ Large andVL datasets ‣ Good with related data ‣ Serious support for aesthetics ‣ Modelling Environment ‣ http://processing.org/ ‣ http://www.openprocessing.org/
  16. 16. Open Processing
  17. 17. Processing.js
  18. 18. Processing.js http://nytlabs.com/projects/cascade.html
  19. 19. Tableau ‣ Commercial ‣ Offers a Free Public Application ‣ Encourages sharing and focusses on building a narrative around visualisation of your research data ‣ Education and Non-Commercial Licenses available ‣ Mature and evolving rapidly to demonstrate the newest and most exciting visualisation types ‣ And our friendsWattenberg andViegas seem to be onboard
  20. 20. Tableau http://www.tableausoftware.com/public
  21. 21. Prefuse ‣ flare.prefuse ‣ Flash-based ‣ Great transitions and very approachable ‣ Beware of Datalocking ‣ http://flare.prefuse.org/demo
  22. 22. Gephi ‣ We Looked at it two weeks ago ‣ Open Source ‣ Mapping andVisualising Relationships and Networks ‣ An outstandingVisual Development Environment ‣ Multiplatform ‣ Extensible!! ‣ https://gephi.org/
  23. 23. Points of Departure ‣ DIRT (Digital Research Tools) ‣ Visualisation in Education ! ‣ Getting Started with R ‣ Using R in DH ‣ MONK ‣ Data Journalism @ Stanford
  24. 24. "If you are not making anything, 
 you are not…a digital humanist." ! - Stephen Ramsay
  25. 25. Considering the state of things: ! "Sample on Building versus Sharing"
  26. 26. Sample ‣ Production versus Reproduction of Knowledge ‣ The promise of the digital is not in the way it allows us to ask new questions because of digital tools or because of new methodologies made possible by those tools. 
 The promise is in the way the digital reshapes the representation, sharing, and discussion of knowledge. We are no longer bound by the physical demands of printed books and paper journals, no longer constrained by production costs and distribution friction, no longer hampered by a top-down and unsustainable business model. And we should no longer be content to make our work public achingly slowly along ingrained routes, authors and readers alike delayed by innumerable gateways limiting knowledge production and sharing.
  27. 27. Digital Arts and Humanities Communities of Practise? Type 1: Humanities computing subfield, work with computers dating back to the 1990s (and earlier) Type 1.5: Appearance of the "alt-ac/digital humanities tendency," emerging around 2008/2009 positioning the digital solving the jobs crisis among humanities PhDs with scholars pursuing broader range of intellectual jobs beyond professorships. 
 Visions of the "big tent," of an opening up of scholarly activity. Type 2: Recent emergence of critique and backlash (coming from a media studies/cultural studies orientation) against digital arts+humanities as a kind of inside-job sabotage of academia by neoliberal forces and ideologies dressed up to seem like liberation from hierarchy, but in fact smuggling in invidious forces: the deskilling of academic laborers; the assessment-crazed "show me the data" loss of control over the classroom; the loss of control over the publication process; MOOC-ville; and, worst of all, the mirroring at the micro-level of academe what are macro-level operations of neoliberalism, surveillance, corporatization, and inequality in contemporary society. - Michael Kramer in response to Stephen Ramsay
  28. 28. mix, match, mash, manifest
  29. 29. 1st wave of digital work was quantitative, mobilizing the search and retrieval powers of the database, automating corpus linguistics, stacking hypercards into critical arrays.
  30. 30. The second wave is qualitative, interpretive, experiential, emotive, generative in character.
  31. 31. Interdisciplinarity/transdisciplinarity/multidisciplinarity are empty words ( ) unless they imply changes in language, practice, method, and output.
  32. 32. The digital is the realm of the :
 open source, open resources - 4M
  33. 33. Digital Humanities implies the multi‐purposing and multiple channeling of humanistic knowledge
  34. 34. Digital Humanities = Big Humanities = Generative Humanities
  35. 35. by emphasizing design, multimediality, and the experiential, it seeks to expand the compass of the affective range to which scholarship can aspire
  36. 36. Process is the new god; not product. Anything that stands in the way of the perpetual mash‐up and remix stands in the way of the digital revolution
  37. 37. Wiki‐scholarship is iterative, cumulative, and collaborative
  38. 38. Digital Humanists recognize curation as a central feature of the future of the Humanities disciplines ! It recasts the scholar as curator and the curator as scholar ! Curation means making arguments through objects as well as words, images, and sounds
  39. 39. Moving Forward
  40. 40. Selling A DAH Project 1. Have a Concrete Idea. 1. Find a few successful project models of what you want to do in order to demonstrate feasibility. 2. You should look for examples both inside and outside of your discipline. Matthew Kirschenbaum has an article “What is Digital Humanities andWhat’s it Doing in English Departments?” for English folks.  If you only have a vague sense of an idea that excites you, let it simmer until you can learn more and become prepared to answer tough questions.
  41. 41. Selling A DAH Project 2. Get the Facts. If some of your ideas come under attack, you should be prepared to defend them if you are committed to, say, sharing your work online with open-access. 
 Steve Hitchcock maintains a webliography on the open- access question that addresses both sides of the debate (though many trend towards showing greater citation under open-access).
  42. 42. Selling A DAH Project 3. Do It. 
 Moving from planning to learning and doing can be the greatest challenge, but if you get something rolling and make a commitment you must follow through. 
 Everything might not make it into your final project, but your efforts will provide valuable experience. 
 There is also something to be said about asking for forgiveness rather than permission. ! - Alex Galazara
  43. 43. ThankYou and Be In Touch shawn.day@ucc.ie @iridium

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