Color Photography

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Photo Communications, Spring 2012
Columbia College Chicago

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Color Photography

  1. 1. 22-3530 - 01 PHOTO COMMUNICATIONS color
  2. 2. The first permanent color photograph wastaking in 1861 by physicist James ClerkMaxwell who used what is known as thecolor separation method, shooting threeseparate black and white photos usingthree filters: red, green, and blue. He thenprojected the three images registered withtheir corresponding filters overlapping themto create a color image. The photo below isthe famous tartan ribbon photo, the firstpermanent color photograph.
  3. 3. View of Agen, France, showing the St. Caprais cathedral, by Louis Ducos du Hauron,1877. Heliochrome(multilayer dichromated pigmented gelatin process).
  4. 4. Louis Ducos du Hauron, Still life with rooster1869-1879 (ca), Color print, dye imbibition process
  5. 5. Stuffed Birds, 1895 (ca)Joly Color, George Eastman House
  6. 6. The Smithsonian National Museum of American History recently discovered these images, the first3-D, color stereoscopic photographs of San Francisco after the 1906 earthquake. PhotographerFrederick Eugene Ives took the color images, known as kromograms, six months after themagnitude 7.8 earthquake struck the city on April 18, 1906.
  7. 7. In Lyons, France, Auguste and Louis Lumière, the inventors of the first practical motion pictureprojector, patented a major breakthrough in the making of color photographs in 1904. TheAutochrome Lumière was the first commercially viable and extensively used color photographicprocess. Introduced to the market in 1907, it remained in production until 1935.
  8. 8. King Frederic VIII and Queen Louise of Denmark, Paris [the first news pictures in color]1907, 17 June
  9. 9. In Adobe programs, there are two color models you need to know: RGB & CMYK RED BLUE GREEN (K=black)
  10. 10. In Adobe programs, there are two color models you need to know: RGB & CMYK RED MAGENTA YELLOW BLUE GREEN CYAN (K=black)
  11. 11. RGB is light. CMYK is ink.
  12. 12. RGB is light. CMYK is ink.RGB is called additive because all of the colors together at 100% would create white.
  13. 13. RGB is light. CMYK is ink. RGB is called additive because all of the colors together at 100% would create white.CMYK is called subtractive because the absence of all ink would leave white.
  14. 14. Taken together, RGB and CMY form a relationship ofprimaries and secondary colors that can be mixed to create all of the colors in between.
  15. 15. All six primary colors are made up of one complement and two components. A 100% fully saturated green also contains no magenta. At all. Magenta also contains no green. They are each other’s complements.
  16. 16. All six primary colors are made up of one complement and two components. A 100% fully saturated green is composed of equal amount of yellow and cyan only. Yellow and cyan are green’s components. A 100% fully saturated green also contains no magenta. At all. Magenta also contains no green. They are each other’s complements.
  17. 17. Every color can be de ned by four essential qualities: 1. HUE 2. SATURATION 3. TEMPERATURE 4. VALUE
  18. 18. Every color can be de ned by four essential qualities: 1. HUE Where the color sits in the visible wavelength: “red”, “blue”
  19. 19. Every color can be de ned by four essential qualities: 2. SATURATION The intensity of a color: “ re engine red”, “pastel red”
  20. 20. As a graphic designer, you needto be comfortable with withworking with RGB (256 values)and CMYK (ink percentages).How would you increase thesaturation of the green sweater?What is the “formula” for thesweater?
  21. 21. In a fully desaturated image, theRGB values will be equal.In the example to the left, thepixel that is being measured has avalue of 33 in all three channels,indicating that it is fullydesaturated/neutral.
  22. 22. Every color can be de ned by four essential qualities: 2. SATURATION The intensity of a color: “ re engine red”, “pastel red”
  23. 23. Every color can be de ned by four essential qualities: 3. TEMPERATURE The color’s perceived warmth or coolness
  24. 24. Every color can be de ned by four essential qualities: 4. VALUE (or BRIGHTNESS) The tonal value of a color, how light or dark the color is
  25. 25. Every color can be de ned by four essential qualities: 4. VALUE (or BRIGHTNESS) The tonal value of a color, how light or dark the color is
  26. 26. Every color can be de ned by four essential qualities: 4. VALUE (or BRIGHTNESS) The tonal value of a color, how light or dark the color is
  27. 27. COLOR EXERCISES
  28. 28. CORRECT WITH: auto color
  29. 29. CORRECT WITH: color balance
  30. 30. CORRECT WITH: levels
  31. 31. CORRECT WITH: channels
  32. 32. CORRECT WITH: curves
  33. 33. CORRECT WITH: hue saturation
  34. 34. CORRECT WITH: match color

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