ID & BRANDING (Intro to GD, Week 5b)

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Week 5b, Introduction to Identity Design & Branding

Presentation from Introduction to Graphic Design, Columbia College Chicago. Much of the content taken from readings, including the textbooks: Timothy Samara's "Design Elements" and "Design Evolution." Other references cited in presentation. Please note: many slides are intended for class discussion and might not make sense out of context.

Published in: Design, Business, Technology

ID & BRANDING (Intro to GD, Week 5b)

  1. 1. IDENTITY & BRAND
  2. 2. IDENTITY
  3. 3. The term graphic identity typically refers to the logo of a company, usually supported by system of rules and guidelines that establish how a company will represent itself through advertisements, collateral, stationery, signage, vehicles, etc.
  4. 4. Identity ≠ Brand While a graphic identity system is an important part of a brand, it is only the visible component, not the brand itself. The logo is a sign for the brand. A logo redesign is not a rebranding, although is one of the easiest components of brand to successfully change.
  5. 5. Identity ≠ Brand While a graphic identity system is an important part of a brand, it is only the visible component, not the brand itself. The logo is a sign for the brand. A logo redesign is not a rebranding, although is one of the easiest components of brand to successfully change.
  6. 6. Identity ≠ Brand While a graphic identity system is an important part of a brand, it is only the visible component, not the brand itself. The logo is a sign for the brand. A logo redesign is not a rebranding, although is one of the easiest components of brand to successfully change.
  7. 7. Identity ≠ Brand While a graphic identity system is an important part of a brand, it is only the visible component, not the brand itself. The logo is a sign for the brand. A logo redesign is not a rebranding, although is one of the easiest components of brand to successfully change.
  8. 8. Identity ≠ Brand While a graphic identity system is an important part of a brand, it is only the visible component, not the brand itself. The logo is a sign for the brand. A logo redesign is not a rebranding, although is one of the easiest components of brand to successfully change.
  9. 9. Identity ≠ Brand While a graphic identity system is an important part of a brand, it is only the visible component, not the brand itself. The logo is a sign for the brand. A logo redesign is not a rebranding, although is one of the easiest components of brand to successfully change.
  10. 10. BRAND
  11. 11. A brand is a persons gut feeling about a product, service, or company. It’s a gut feeling because we are all emotional, intuitive beings, despite our best efforts to be rational. What is your gut feeling about the companies above? How did you arrive at those feelings?
  12. 12. A brand is a persons gut feeling about a product, service, or company. It’s a gut feeling because we are all emotional, intuitive beings, despite our best efforts to be rational. What is your gut feeling about the companies above? How did you arrive at those feelings?
  13. 13. A brand is a persons gut feeling about a product, service, or company. It’s a gut feeling because we are all emotional, intuitive beings, despite our best efforts to be rational. What is your gut feeling about the companies above? How did you arrive at those feelings?
  14. 14. A brand is a persons gut feeling about a product, service, or company. It’s a gut feeling because we are all emotional, intuitive beings, despite our best efforts to be rational. What is your gut feeling about the companies above? How did you arrive at those feelings?
  15. 15. A brand is a person’s gut feeling, because in the end the brand is defined by individuals, not by companies, markets, or the so-called general public. Each person creates his or her own version of it.
  16. 16. While companies can’t control this process, they can influence it by communicating the qualities that make this product different than that product.
  17. 17. When enough individuals arrive at the same gut feeling, a company can be said to have a brand. =
  18. 18. In other words, a brand is not what you say it is. It’s what they say it is.
  19. 19. In other words, a brand is not what you say it is. It’s what they say it is.
  20. 20. In other words, a brand is not what you say it is. It’s what they say it is.
  21. 21. In other words, a brand is not what you say it is. It’s what they say it is.
  22. 22. In other words, a brand is not what you say it is. It’s what they say it is.
  23. 23. In other words, a brand is not what you say it is. It’s what they say it is.
  24. 24. In other words, a brand is not what you say it is. It’s what they say it is.
  25. 25. The Brand Gap by Marty Neumeier
  26. 26. Guidelines/Standards—The first goal of implementing an approved identity program is to establish consistent usage across a company. Dow Corporate Identity Standards Use of the DOW Diamond September 2002 Standards Corporate BBCi brand guidelines identity DRAFT version 2.2 guidelines Version 2.2 July 2003 April 21st 2005 Visual Identity Opt 48398 0703 Guidelines 1 Consistency is established by publishing a Identity Standards manual that will guide practitioners through any usage they might encounter.
  27. 27. What a logo is and does, by Paul Rand
  28. 28. A logo is a flag, a signature, an escutcheon. Escutcheon is the term used in heraldry for the shield displayed in a coat of arms.
  29. 29. A logo doesn't sell (directly), it identifies.
  30. 30. A logo is rarely a description of a business.
  31. 31. A logo derives its meaning from the quality of the thing it symbolizes, not the other way around.
  32. 32. A logo derives its meaning from the quality of the thing it symbolizes, not the other way around.
  33. 33. A logo derives its meaning from the quality of the thing it symbolizes, not the other way around.
  34. 34. A logo is less important than the product it signifies; what it means is more important that what it looks like.
  35. 35. I D E N T I T Y: S TAT I O N E R Y
  36. 36. Your stationery should: Embody how your company wants to be seen by others Demonstrate a logical extension of your logo and overall business identity Clearly present necessary information with a clear and engaging design Establish a consistent style of usage that can be extended to other uses
  37. 37. Questions What is the most important part of the logo? How can I create a hierarchy of information? What kind of business card would this type of company have? Colorful/fun/boutique, or monotone/sterile/definitive/ corporate?
  38. 38. Strategies: 1. Size 2. Space 3. Color & Contrast
  39. 39. 1. Size Create a hierarchy of information by varying type size, weight, and width. Use a type family with a good range of fonts.
  40. 40. 1. Size
  41. 41. 1. Size
  42. 42. 1. Size
  43. 43. 2. Space Create hierarchy through space only Working with the grid: symmetrical/asymmetrical Law of Thirds & the Golden Section (see handouts) Positive/negative Correspondence: creating alignments and intersections
  44. 44. 2. Space The typographic grid is a proportional regulator for composition, tables, pictures, etc...The difficulty is: to find the balance, the maximum of conformity to a rule with the maximum of freedom. Or: the maximum constraints with the greatest possible variability. —Karl Gerstner, 1961
  45. 45. 2. Space
  46. 46. 2. Space
  47. 47. 2. Space
  48. 48. 2. Space
  49. 49. 2. Space
  50. 50. 2. Space
  51. 51. 2. Space
  52. 52. 2. Space
  53. 53. 2. Space
  54. 54. 2. Space
  55. 55. 2. Space
  56. 56. 2. Space
  57. 57. 3. Color & Contrast
  58. 58. 3. Color & Contrast
  59. 59. 3. Color & Contrast
  60. 60. 3. Color & Contrast
  61. 61. 3. Color & Contrast

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