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Scholarly writing workshop by shawn nordell
Scholarly writing workshop by shawn nordell
Scholarly writing workshop by shawn nordell
Scholarly writing workshop by shawn nordell
Scholarly writing workshop by shawn nordell
Scholarly writing workshop by shawn nordell
Scholarly writing workshop by shawn nordell
Scholarly writing workshop by shawn nordell
Scholarly writing workshop by shawn nordell
Scholarly writing workshop by shawn nordell
Scholarly writing workshop by shawn nordell
Scholarly writing workshop by shawn nordell
Scholarly writing workshop by shawn nordell
Scholarly writing workshop by shawn nordell
Scholarly writing workshop by shawn nordell
Scholarly writing workshop by shawn nordell
Scholarly writing workshop by shawn nordell
Scholarly writing workshop by shawn nordell
Scholarly writing workshop by shawn nordell
Scholarly writing workshop by shawn nordell
Scholarly writing workshop by shawn nordell
Scholarly writing workshop by shawn nordell
Scholarly writing workshop by shawn nordell
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Scholarly writing workshop by shawn nordell

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Workshop on how to conduct scholarly writing using daily short writing sessions.

Workshop on how to conduct scholarly writing using daily short writing sessions.

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  • 1. Scholarly Writing Or How to write your Dissertation/Thesis on 30 minutes a day! Shawn E. Nordell, Ph.D. (shawn.nordell@slu.edu) Department of Biology, Saint Louis University Senior Faculty Fellow, Reinert Teaching Center
  • 2. Learning Objectives/Goals Discuss the obstacles to writing  Present strategies for getting started writing  Present strategies for maintaining a productive writing schedule 
  • 3. Assessment of Writing Problems  What prevents you from writing?  Free write for five minutes on what prevents you from writing.  Write whatever comes to your mind about what prevents you from writing.  Do NOT stop writing during the five minutes.
  • 4. Assessment of Writing Problems  What prevents you from writing?
  • 5. Writing Misconceptions  Writing requires:  HUGE blocks of time  No interruptions  Amazingly clear ideas and thoughts!  Complete paper written in head already!  Each sentence will come out perfectly on the computer screen!  Simply NOT Supported!!!
  • 6. The most successful academic writers write every day for short periods of time.  Individuals who wrote daily (Boice): • Wrote twice as many hours as those who wrote occasionally in big blocks of time • Wrote and revised ten times as many pages • Also produced more consistent creative ideas
  • 7. The most successful academic writers write every day for short periods of time. 25 minutes of writing  5 minute break   You can do almost anything for 25 minutes!  Pomodorotechnique.com
  • 8. The most successful academic writers write every day for short periods of time.  Make writing a daily activity  Regardless of mood  Regardless of readiness to write  Schedule your writing time each day  When you are “fresh”?
  • 9. The most successful academic writers write every day for short periods of time.  Priority principle  Make writing a priority  Delay reward until after writing • E.g. shower, checking email/ internet, chocolate, reading the newspaper/ internet news, watching TV/ internet  Failure to write results in: • Contribution to least favorite organization
  • 10. The most successful academic writers write every day for short periods of time.  Establish one or few writing places  No non-essential reading  No cleaning during writing session  Quiet place  Limit social interruptions • • • • Close door Post writing schedule Unplug or turn off cell phone and internet Create set aside list  Where is this for you?
  • 11. Limiting Distractions  Minimize disruptions  NO email, Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Pinterest, etc.  Apps that control your internet addiction  StayFocused (Chrome) LeechBlock (Firefox) OmmWriter (Mac, PC, Ipad) Freedom (Mac)   
  • 12. The most successful academic writers write every day for short periods of time.    Make a daily writing goal Plan to work on specific finishable units of writing in each session. What is your specific goal for this writing session?    Revise two paragraphs in introduction Write 500 words for argument on ….. Draft two new paragraphs for documentation of evidence for……
  • 13. Successful writers write BEFORE they are ready  Writing without feeling “ready”  Learn to tolerate (and even embrace) imperfect material in early drafts  Anne Lamott:  Bird by Bird, Some Instructions on Writing and Life  Terrible first drafts lead to good second drafts and terrific third drafts   Good way to get started writing Generate creative work
  • 14. Successful writers write BEFORE they are ready     Write to help develop and formulate their thesis Write to better understand their topic Write to learn the best prose to use for their discipline Exercise:  Write for 5 minutes on some aspect of your current writing project  DON’T stop • For anything  Write anything!
  • 15. Successful writers practice Active Waiting  Active waiting:  means pausing reflectively during the day  means thinking about writing  sets the stage for the next days writing  means making notes/ diagrams for the next days writing
  • 16. “Park on the downhill slope”  Leave your writing with an easy re-entry point  Partial sentence  Lead in to next paragraph  To do list
  • 17. Successful writers practice NonAttachment Moderate overattachment and overreaction  Encourage criticism!  You are NOT your writing!  Terrible first drafts are NOT written by terrible people  Use storage files to store unneeded sentences, paragraphs, ideas 
  • 18. Strategies for the long run  Keep a writing journal  Record how many minutes spent writing and reading  Boice experiment (1 year): • Controls - wrote in big block • no change to writing habits • Writing avg = 17 pages • Daily writers with journal • Writing avg = 64 pages • Daily writer with journal and group • Writing avg = 157 pages
  • 19. Strategies for the long run    Find a support group Writing groups – SLU Writing Services Online  Academic Writing Club (Academic Ladder) • www.academicwritingclub.com • fee based ($2-3/ day)  Twitter • #writingsprint • #wordsprint  PhinisheD • http://www.phinished.org/ (free)
  • 20. Assessment of Writing Problems   What prevents you from writing? Anything we have not yet addressed????
  • 21. Review  Write before you are ready  Don’t  wait for deadlines Minimize distractions  Writing     conducive space Don’t stop writing during your writing session End writing session so that it is easy to start again tomorrow Be mindful of your writing and waiting Kick it out the door!
  • 22. References:  Boice, Robert.1990. Professor as writers: A self-help guide to productive writing. New Forums Press, Stillwater, OK  Boice, Robert. 2000. Advice for new faculty members: nihil nimus. Allyn & Bacon. Needham Heights, MA  Belcher, Wendy Laura. 2009. Writing your journal article in 12 weeks. Sage Press. Los Angeles

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