English result motivation talk
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English result motivation talk

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These are the slides from the ER talk so you can do one or two of the activities if you wish

These are the slides from the ER talk so you can do one or two of the activities if you wish

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  • 2. Ask about the pictures: Have you ever felt like this in a lesson? Have you had students look like this? 3. Put the students in pairs to discuss the questions.
  • The lesson is 'dry' - too abstract or theoretical. The teacher is doing all the work (TTT). The teacher isn't doing enough work (excessive amounts of student-centred work). The lesson is too easy or too difficult. The lesson has no clear aim. The lesson feels slow. The lesson focuses too much on one skill or language area. The students have been sitting still for too long. So we need to make sure they are motivated. Let’s consider motivation…
  • The lesson is 'dry' - too abstract or theoretical. The teacher is doing all the work (TTT). The teacher isn't doing enough work (excessive amounts of student-centred work). The lesson is too easy or too difficult. The lesson has no clear aim. The lesson feels slow. The lesson focuses too much on one skill or language area. The students have been sitting still for too long. So we need to make sure they are motivated. Let’s consider motivation…
  • Explain distinctions: Extrinsic = associated with achieving goals and objectives. In the language classroom that may mean being m otivated by wanting to pass an exam or get a better job for example. The reason has nothing to do with the actual content of what you're learning. You try to do something for an external reward, but its very difficult to keep your attention on the long and difficult task of language learning if you have no intrinsic interest in it. Intrinsic = associated with satisfaction and enjoyment. Motivated by the satisfaction and enjoyment of learning - by the language and your progress in learning it, by the classroom activities, by the content of the texts. It's the kind of motivation that makes you pay attention to something for its own sake, even if there's no reward.
  • Satisfaction = You set out to achieve something, you achieve it effectively. You see your competence build over time and you know that it's YOU who's achieved it through your own efforts. Enjoyment = The classroom material and activities attract your attention like a magnet. Both kinds of intrinsic motivation are important, but this talk will focus on enjoyment.
  • What kinds of qualities do materials and activities need to have to be enjoyable? Here are some…We will go on to look at each of these in turn… Note: From here on, the talk is flexi-length depending on time available. If time is short, some of the examples given can be skipped over quickly or missed out altogether. But try to keep at least two for each of the 4 categories in slide 4 above. The examples in the curiosity section are a little less 'participatory' since there's more focus on the text than on the task that goes with it. The main section-head slides are indicated by bigger font size. The final, open bullet allows the presenter to acknowledge audience contributions which don't appear on the list. Depending on presenter's style and preferences, could include an elicit-from-the-audience stage before each of the bullet-point section slides.
  • What kind of things can you discover about a person and their recent activities by looking in their handbag? That's what students are doing with this picture, they're playing Sherlock Holmes and deducing Ana's recent activities - which is always an intriguing activity
  • We try to arouse curiosity to encourage people to read on… Click to reveal 1 st photo – who’s this? See if anyone recognises Javier Bardem. Click to reveal 2 nd picture. Has anyone seen this film? How old do you think the actor is? What things do you think were changed to make him look old? Get ppts to talk to their partner and then reveal the answers. How many did you get? Now elicit what grammatical point they should encourage ss to notice in this text.
  • Just show the title. If you look at the 'most read' list of on-line newspapers, you will often find this kind of human interest story, in this case a bungled crime. Clearly, such stories capture most people's attention. Organise the ppts into 2 teams, or get two teams to come to the front. They have to take it in turns to guess the next word. Scoring: 3 points for the exact word 2 points for a similar word 1 point for the correct word type and possible answer. Click to reveal the first part of the story. Elicit 1 agreed answer from the first team. Perhaps nominate 1 person to keep score.
  • Read out the next part and then elicit 1 agreed word from the other team. Score keeper keeps score.
  • The story ends with Ms Robinson asking the customer to wait while she called ‘the manager’ and then the police arrived. This activity is fun for the ss and keeps their interest. It also makes them think about the grammar of words and collocations. You need to think carefully about which word to stop before, so that it is possible to guess.
  • Ok, can you do this? Show or tell the person sitting next to you… (Show the pictures one by one. For the second one, ask 'Can you write with both hands - your right and your left?. For some of the pictures, the appropriate question is 'Can you read this?) People like to talk about what they can do, and it's a perfect vehicle for getting across the concept of can and can't. And the task involves a little movement, which is good for a kinaesthetic learning style. (elem p70 Can you do this? Not the whole page, but just the following pictures one by one, without the numbers:a. 1b. 2c. 3d. 4e. 6f. 9g. 11h. 12)
  • Ok, can you do this? Show or tell the person sitting next to you… (Show the pictures one by one. For the second one, ask 'Can you write with both hands - your right and your left?. For some of the pictures, the appropriate question is 'Can you read this?) People like to talk about what they can do, and it's a perfect vehicle for getting across the concept of can and can't. And the task involves a little movement, which is good for a kinaesthetic learning style. (elem p70 Can you do this? Not the whole page, but just the following pictures one by one, without the numbers:a. 1b. 2c. 3d. 4e. 6f. 9g. 11h. 12)
  • And finally – challenge. We need to ensure that the ss are mentally challenged. Although their English may be of a low level, we need to provide opportunities for them to share what they know about other subjects and to be challenged in other ways – not just linguistically.
  • Show this slide for ppts to compare with who they had thought of. Play the audio: (Elem SB 10D4) – ppts listen and guess who it is. There are 4. Depending on time, you can play as many or as few as you wish. Answers: 1. Martin Luther King 2. Marie Curie 3. Mother Teresa 4. Aung San Suu Kyi
  • Remind participants what the talk has been about. For successful learning to take place learners need to be motivated. Extrinsic motivation in the form of success orientation and assessment is important...
  • C ombining this with curiosity, entertainment, personalisation and challenge to foster the learners' intrinsic motivation will bring even greater results.

English result motivation talk English result motivation talk Presentation Transcript

  • Motivating Learners to get the right result Shaun Wilden
      • What do you do when
      • you're bored?
      • Talk with a partner.
      • Think about the last time you were bored (e.g. on a train, on a day off, in your schooldays, at work). What did you do to pass the time?
  • How do you meet and greet?
  • Can you really do that? Write notes for each thing. Then ask and answer questions with a partner to find out what’s true and false. Remember at least Two thing MUST be a bluff
    • Student A:
    • Something you can do very well
    • A time when you weren’t able to speak
    • Something you’ve never been able to do
    • Something you could do when you were a child that you can’t do now
    • A difficult test you managed to pass
    • Student B:
    • A time you couldn’t stay awake
    • Something you’ve always been able to do
    • Something you’ll be able to do next year
    • Something you can’t do very well
    • Something you’d love to be able to do
    Adapted from English Result Intermediate Photocopiable activity book
  • Why do students get bored? Taken from Classroom Dynamic by Hadfield
  • Why do students get bored?
    • The lesson is 'dry‘.
    • The teacher is doing all the work (TTT).
    • The teacher isn't doing enough work (too SC).
    • The lesson is too easy or too difficult.
    • The lesson has no clear aim.
    • The lesson feels slow.
    • The lesson focuses too much on one skill or
    • language area.
    • The students have been sitting still for too long.
  •  
  •  
  •  
  • MOTIVATION EXTRINSIC achieving goals INTRINSIC satisfaction & enjoyment
  • INTRINSIC MOTIVATION SATISFACTION ENJOYMENT
    • curiosity
    • entertainment
    • personalization
    • challenge
  • Curiosity
  • Curiosity
    • Gennifer Robinson, 20, is a cashier at the Sav-a-Center grocery store. One day in April, she drove to her friend’s
    Curiosity True Crimes
    • Gennifer Robinson, 20, is a cashier at the Sav-a-Center grocery store. One day in April, she drove to her friend’s house in Matairie, Louisiana, and parked the
    True Crimes
    • Gennifer Robinson, 20, is a cashier at the Sav-a-Center grocery store. One day in April, she drove to her friend’s house in Matairie, Louisiana, and parked the car. When she was in the house, somebody broke in and stole her
    True Crimes
    • Gennifer Robinson, 20, is a cashier at the Sav-a-Center grocery store. One day in April, she drove to her friend’s house in Matairie, Louisiana, and parked the car. When she was in the house, somebody broke in and stole her purse, cheque book and driving licence.
    True Crimes
    • Five days later, she was at work. She came back after the coffee
    • Five days later, she was at work. She came back after the coffee break and her first customer wrote a cheque for $259.17. Ms Robinson asked to see some
    • Five days later, she was at work. She came back after the coffee break and her first customer wrote a cheque for $259.17. Ms Robinson asked to see some ID, and the customer gave her a
    • Five days later, she was at work. She came back after the coffee break and her first customer wrote a cheque for $259.17. Ms Robinson asked to see some ID, and the customer gave her a driving licence. Ms Robinson saw
    • Five days later, she was at work. She came back after the coffee break and her first customer wrote a cheque for $259.17. Ms Robinson asked to see some ID, and the customer gave her a driving licence. Ms Robinson saw her own name and photo on the licence!
  • Challenge
  • Challenge
  • Challenge
    • Draw on the students' existing knowledge of the world
    • Task:
    • How many Nobel prize-winners can you name?
  •  
  • Personalisation
    • 1 You hear the alarm clock. What do you do?
    • a. I get up.
    • b. I wake up before the alarm clock.
    • c. I press ‘snooze’ five times.
    • 2 You get up. What do you do first?
    • a. I sit on the bed and think.
    • b. I have a shower and then get dressed.
    • c. I get dressed and then have a shower.
    Personality Test: Are you a morning flower or a morning monster? 3 You go to the bathroom. Somebody is there before you. What do you do? a. I go back to bed. b. I say ‘Good morning!’ and go to the kitchen for an orange juice. c. I walk into the door.
  • MOTIVATION extrinsic intrinsic
  • MOTIVATION SATISFACTION ENJOYMENT
  • Thank you for listening and participating [email_address] shaunwilden.com @shaunwilden