0
Implications and Perspectives on Cheating<br />0<br />
Troubling Statistics<br />Out of every 1,000 students at your campus, 750 have admitted to cheating, 15have been caught an...
The Stereotypical Cheater Profiles<br />2<br />Social Groups<br />Behaviors<br />
There is a gap between what we know about cheater profiles and what institutions do to reduce the incidence of cheating.<b...
Three types of students <br />4<br />Group 1<br />Always Honest<br />Group 2<br />Habitual Cheaters<br />
Three types of students <br />5<br />Group 3<br />Situational Cheaters<br /><ul><li>Attitude
Perception
Extrinsic Motivators</li></li></ul><li>Virtual Classroom<br />6<br />
The Cheating Virus<br />7<br />
The Cheating Virus<br />8<br />
The Cheating Virus<br />9<br />
The Cheating Virus<br />10<br />
Life-Long Implications of Cheating<br />Students who are dishonest in class are more likely to engage in fraud and theft w...
Life-Long Implications of Cheating<br />Students who cheat cannot perform roles for which they were hired.<br />12<br />
Degree Dilution<br />13<br />Academic dishonesty hurts general employability and the potential for promotions.<br />Bernar...
Cheating Impacts Your Institution<br />Reputation<br />Lower quality faculty and students<br />Donations suffer<br />14<br />
Faculty Beliefs About Cheating<br />15<br />86% believe students cheat at least occasionally!<br />
The enforcement factor (an analogy)<br />16<br /><ul><li>EducationOnly (1984)
Local, county and state campaigns, increase national seat belt usage to 15%</li></li></ul><li>The enforcement factor (an a...
Local, county and state campaigns, increase national seat belt usage to 15%
Education + Mild Enforcement (1990)
“Secondary safety seat belt laws” passes in 38 states. National usage rate climbs to 50%</li></li></ul><li>The enforcement...
Local, county and state campaigns, increase national seat belt usage to 15%
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Implications and perspectives on cheating

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  • Those with higher grade point averages (GPAs) tend to be less likely to cheat. Older, non-traditional students tend to cheat less than their younger counterparts. Those involved in campus organizations like the Greek system and athletic teams are more likely to cheat than their peers  (Carpenter, Harding, Finelli, Montgomery &amp; Passow, 2006).
  • Student with devil on shoulder, student with angel on shoulder, and then a student with both [great visual!]
  • This slide helps Transition from student/self to student/studentShow animation of other red desks lighting up. Then show a pocket of green desks and try to get audience to sympathize with that student (When honest students discover cheaters escaping detection, it can discourage student morale, as they see the rewards for their work cheapened. *) *Lawrence M. Hinman – Virtual Virtues: Reflections on Academic Integrity in the Age of the Internet* Innes, Mitra, Is Dishonesty Contagious?, June 26, 2009**Douglas N. Bunn, Steven B. Caudill, and Daniel M. Gropper, &quot;Crime in the Classroom: An Economic Analysis of Undergraduate Student Cheating Behavior&quot;, The Journal of Economic Education 23, no. 3, (Summer 1992), 204***McCabe, D. L., Treviño, L. K., &amp; Butterfield, K. D. (2001b, January/February). Dishonesty in academic environments. The Journal of Higher Education, 72(1), 29-46.
  • This slide helps Transition from student/self to student/studentShow animation of other red desks lighting up. Then show a pocket of green desks and try to get audience to sympathize with that student (When honest students discover cheaters escaping detection, it can discourage student morale, as they see the rewards for their work cheapened. *) *Lawrence M. Hinman – Virtual Virtues: Reflections on Academic Integrity in the Age of the Internet* Innes, Mitra, Is Dishonesty Contagious?, June 26, 2009**Douglas N. Bunn, Steven B. Caudill, and Daniel M. Gropper, &quot;Crime in the Classroom: An Economic Analysis of Undergraduate Student Cheating Behavior&quot;, The Journal of Economic Education 23, no. 3, (Summer 1992), 204***McCabe, D. L., Treviño, L. K., &amp; Butterfield, K. D. (2001b, January/February). Dishonesty in academic environments. The Journal of Higher Education, 72(1), 29-46.
  • This slide helps Transition from student/self to student/studentShow animation of other red desks lighting up. Then show a pocket of green desks and try to get audience to sympathize with that student (When honest students discover cheaters escaping detection, it can discourage student morale, as they see the rewards for their work cheapened. *) *Lawrence M. Hinman – Virtual Virtues: Reflections on Academic Integrity in the Age of the Internet* Innes, Mitra, Is Dishonesty Contagious?, June 26, 2009**Douglas N. Bunn, Steven B. Caudill, and Daniel M. Gropper, &quot;Crime in the Classroom: An Economic Analysis of Undergraduate Student Cheating Behavior&quot;, The Journal of Economic Education 23, no. 3, (Summer 1992), 204***McCabe, D. L., Treviño, L. K., &amp; Butterfield, K. D. (2001b, January/February). Dishonesty in academic environments. The Journal of Higher Education, 72(1), 29-46.
  • This slide helps Transition from student/self to student/studentShow animation of other red desks lighting up. Then show a pocket of green desks and try to get audience to sympathize with that student (When honest students discover cheaters escaping detection, it can discourage student morale, as they see the rewards for their work cheapened. *) *Lawrence M. Hinman – Virtual Virtues: Reflections on Academic Integrity in the Age of the Internet* Innes, Mitra, Is Dishonesty Contagious?, June 26, 2009**Douglas N. Bunn, Steven B. Caudill, and Daniel M. Gropper, &quot;Crime in the Classroom: An Economic Analysis of Undergraduate Student Cheating Behavior&quot;, The Journal of Economic Education 23, no. 3, (Summer 1992), 204***McCabe, D. L., Treviño, L. K., &amp; Butterfield, K. D. (2001b, January/February). Dishonesty in academic environments. The Journal of Higher Education, 72(1), 29-46.
  • This slide helps Transition from student/self to student/studentShow animation of other red desks lighting up. Then show a pocket of green desks and try to get audience to sympathize with that student (When honest students discover cheaters escaping detection, it can discourage student morale, as they see the rewards for their work cheapened. *) *Lawrence M. Hinman – Virtual Virtues: Reflections on Academic Integrity in the Age of the Internet* Innes, Mitra, Is Dishonesty Contagious?, June 26, 2009**Douglas N. Bunn, Steven B. Caudill, and Daniel M. Gropper, &quot;Crime in the Classroom: An Economic Analysis of Undergraduate Student Cheating Behavior&quot;, The Journal of Economic Education 23, no. 3, (Summer 1992), 204***McCabe, D. L., Treviño, L. K., &amp; Butterfield, K. D. (2001b, January/February). Dishonesty in academic environments. The Journal of Higher Education, 72(1), 29-46.
  • Bernard, E. W. (2002). Academic Dishonesty: An Educators Guide. Mahwah: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, Inc Publishers 5-8.
  • 86% of faculty believe that students cheat in online courses at least occasionally0% believed that students never cheated“Notions of independent thinking, intellectual property, the struggle of original thought, and academic freedom are all at risk should dishonesty prevail over integrity,” Ultimately, all of academia suffers.
  • We believe that even one member of the campus community can make a difference,and that change need not take years to show its effects.The nature and feel of the campus community environment—the campus ethos—isa powerful influence on individual student’s attitudes toward cheating. If studentsperceive their campus as merely providing a means to an end—and as unjust, disjointed,laissez faire, impersonal, and without a core identity—deterrents to cheatingmay be very weak.
  • Transcript of "Implications and perspectives on cheating"

    1. 1. Implications and Perspectives on Cheating<br />0<br />
    2. 2. Troubling Statistics<br />Out of every 1,000 students at your campus, 750 have admitted to cheating, 15have been caught and only 7 have received any kind of academic penalty.*<br />An unwinnable battle?<br /> *According to studies done by Josephson Institute of Ethics<br />1<br />
    3. 3. The Stereotypical Cheater Profiles<br />2<br />Social Groups<br />Behaviors<br />
    4. 4. There is a gap between what we know about cheater profiles and what institutions do to reduce the incidence of cheating.<br />3<br />
    5. 5. Three types of students <br />4<br />Group 1<br />Always Honest<br />Group 2<br />Habitual Cheaters<br />
    6. 6. Three types of students <br />5<br />Group 3<br />Situational Cheaters<br /><ul><li>Attitude
    7. 7. Perception
    8. 8. Extrinsic Motivators</li></li></ul><li>Virtual Classroom<br />6<br />
    9. 9. The Cheating Virus<br />7<br />
    10. 10. The Cheating Virus<br />8<br />
    11. 11. The Cheating Virus<br />9<br />
    12. 12. The Cheating Virus<br />10<br />
    13. 13. Life-Long Implications of Cheating<br />Students who are dishonest in class are more likely to engage in fraud and theft when they enter the workplace.<br />11<br />SarathNonis and Cathy Owens Swift, "An Examination of the Relationship between Academic Dishonesty and Workplace Dishonesty”, Journal of Business Education 77, no. 2, (November-December 2001), 69-77.<br />Sims, R.L. (1993). The relationship between academic dishonesty and unethical business practices. Journal of Education for Business, 68(4), 207-211<br />
    14. 14. Life-Long Implications of Cheating<br />Students who cheat cannot perform roles for which they were hired.<br />12<br />
    15. 15. Degree Dilution<br />13<br />Academic dishonesty hurts general employability and the potential for promotions.<br />Bernard, E. W. (2002). Academic Dishonesty: An Educators Guide. Mahwah: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, Inc Publishers 5-8.<br />
    16. 16. Cheating Impacts Your Institution<br />Reputation<br />Lower quality faculty and students<br />Donations suffer<br />14<br />
    17. 17. Faculty Beliefs About Cheating<br />15<br />86% believe students cheat at least occasionally!<br />
    18. 18. The enforcement factor (an analogy)<br />16<br /><ul><li>EducationOnly (1984)
    19. 19. Local, county and state campaigns, increase national seat belt usage to 15%</li></li></ul><li>The enforcement factor (an analogy)<br />17<br /><ul><li>EducationOnly (1984)
    20. 20. Local, county and state campaigns, increase national seat belt usage to 15%
    21. 21. Education + Mild Enforcement (1990)
    22. 22. “Secondary safety seat belt laws” passes in 38 states. National usage rate climbs to 50%</li></li></ul><li>The enforcement factor (an analogy)<br />18<br /><ul><li>EducationOnly (1984)
    23. 23. Local, county and state campaigns, increase national seat belt usage to 15%
    24. 24. Education + Mild Enforcement (1990)
    25. 25. “Secondary safety seat belt laws” passes in 38 states. National usage rate climbs to 50%
    26. 26. Education + “Click It or Ticket” (2004)
    27. 27. Today, all States participate in Click It or Ticket each year. National usage rates hits 79%</li></li></ul><li>Our belief<br />19<br />We believe in an academic environment that not only removes opportunities to cheat but focuses on developing a personal value system that demands ethical behavior in the student.<br />Every level of the institution is invested in creating this intrinsic change.<br />
    28. 28. How we help institutions<br />20<br />Cheating Analytics<br /><ul><li>Which students are cheating?
    29. 29. Which courses?
    30. 30. Which assignments?</li></ul>We are not a webcam company!<br />
    31. 31. <ul><li>Student Identity Verification
    32. 32. Plagiarism 2.0
    33. 33. Collusion</li></ul>How we help institutions<br />Cheating Analytics<br />21<br />We are not a webcam company!<br />
    34. 34. Shaun Sims<br />shaunsims@digitalproctor.com<br />(512) 921-6138<br />22<br />
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