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Framework for talking about Information Ethics and Social Justice in professional librarianship. Emphasis on making sure patrons at all levels of ICT access and literacy are being served.

Framework for talking about Information Ethics and Social Justice in professional librarianship. Emphasis on making sure patrons at all levels of ICT access and literacy are being served.

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  • Assumption: Free & Rational people in a social contract; principles of Justice chosen behind a veil of ignorance – agree to fairness of initial situation (Justice as Fairness// Poetry as a metaphor) Equality in the assignment or Rights and Duties (non-exhaustible resources) – would agree to social and economic inequalities if to the benefit of all – and regardless of “natural endowments” or social circumstances
  • Assumption: Free & Rational people in a social contract; principles of Justice chosen behind a veil of ignorance – agree to fairness of intial situation (Justice as Fairness// Poetry as a metaphor) Equality in the assignment or Rights and Duties (non-exhaustible resources) – would agree to social and economic inequalities if to the benefit of all – and regardless of “natural endowments” or social circumstances
  • Assumption: Free & Rational people in a social contract; principles of Justice chosen behind a veil of ignorance – agree to fairness of intial situation (Justice as Fairness// Poetry as a metaphor) Equality in the assignment or Rights and Duties (non-exhaustible resources) – would agree to social and economic inequalities if to the benefit of all – and regardless of “natural endowments” or social circumstances
  • Assumption: Free & Rational people in a social contract; principles of Justice chosen behind a veil of ignorance – agree to fairness of intial situation (Justice as Fairness// Poetry as a metaphor) Equality in the assignment or Rights and Duties (non-exhaustible resources) – would agree to social and economic inequalities if to the benefit of all – and regardless of “natural endowments” or social circumstances

Transcript

  • 1. Information Ethics in a Lib 2.0 World Kathryn Shaughnessy St. John’s University May 7, 2010 Westchester Library Association
  • 2. Information Ethics in a Lib 2.0 World This presentation is NOT…. http://sanaei.com/photos/life_getting_complicated.jpg
  • 3. Information Ethics in a Lib 2.0 World Rather, it offers a framework for information ethics in relationship to justice and to librarians -- both as a professional collective and as individual people
  • 4. Information Ethics – Philosophical Foundations
    • Philosophy
      • Philosophical anthropology – Who we are
      • Human Rights / Dignity is the basis of Justice ( UN Declaration )
    • Ethics
      • Reflection on mores: start local / cultural  reason towards universal
      • Practical Reason (Aristotle): Good is to be Done, Evil Avoided
      • Is/Ought (Kant): how things are / how they should be
      • Social Contract (Rawls): veil of ignorance  justice as fairness
    • LIBRARY Professional Guidelines / Policy Development (Prescriptive)
    • Positive Laws / Regulations
      • Attempts to safeguard/defend rights (Prescriptive)
      • Enforceable codification of Justice (Retributive)
      • Objectivity of ethics  force of positive law (Finnis)
  • 5. Information Ethics & Social Justice
    • Rawls’ “Theory of Justice” offers two hierarchical principles
      • Each person is to have a right to the most extensive basic liberty compatible with a similar liberty for others (equal liberties of citizenship)
        • Political liberty (right to vote / right to hold office)
        • Freedom of speech/assembly (right of communication)
        • Liberty of conscience / freedom of thought
        • Freedom of person & right to personal property
        • (freedom from arrest / seizure)
      • Social and economic inequalities are to be arranged so that they are both (a) reasonably expected to be to everyone’s advantage, and (b) attached to positions and offices open to all.
    • Social Justice: Evaluate, Judge, Act
      • Evaluate the situation, applies the ethic, enacts justice
      • (evaluates success/failures, catalyst of change)
  • 6. Society (Common Good) Individual (rights/responsibilities) Individual Commutative (Contractual) Contributive Distributive Justice Social Information Ethics & Social Justice Adapted from the PPT Developed by the Office for Social Justice, ASPM http://www.osjspm.org
  • 7. Society (Common Good) Individual ( rights /responsibilities) Contributive Information Ethics & Social Justice Duty to contribute to the Common Good Political: voting Economic: paying taxes Environmental: Recycling Speech: Participation
  • 8. Distributive Information Ethics & Social Justice Equitable distribution of benefits & burdens Political: Voter registration drives / access to offices Economic: Social Security; graduated tax burdens Environment: placement of recycling stations Speech: permits for public speech Increasingly, these distributed benefits are only available through Information & Communications Technologies Individual (rights /responsibilities ) Society (Common Good)
  • 9. Information Ethics & Social Justice A B C D E F G Food / clean water Clothing Shelter “ minimum” “ extra” Distributive Justice: “Equitable” distribution of benefits & burdens
  • 10. Information Ethics & Social Justice Distributive Justice: “Equitable” distribution of benefits & burdens A B C D E F G Food / clean water Clothing Shelter ICT access Education / literacy Health Elasticity of needs/minimum
  • 11. Information Ethics & Social Justice A B C D E F G Food / clean water Clothing Shelter New minimum  less unequal distributions ICT access Education / literacy Health Distributive Justice: Access to information & ICTs
  • 12. Information Ethics & Social Justice: Lib 1.0 Contributive Justice: How Librarians and Information professionals promote Social Justice
    • Meeting ECONOMIC need: necessary, but insufficient
    • Promotion of Basic literacies and life-long education
    • Facilitating access to ICTs
    • ICT Training: “information-poor” & “privacy-impaired”
    • Facilitating local participation in public discourse
    • Promoting study of local/cultural expertise
    • Promotion of cross-disciplinary research and communication with economists, anthropologists, educators, IT, Healthcare workers, engineers
  • 13. Information Ethics & Social Justice: Lib 2.0
    • Hallmarks of the “Social Web” include :
      • Ease of web-based content creation
      • Ease of web-based distribution: RSS / subscription
      • Comments & feedback
      • Sharing, bookmarking, podcasting
      • Tagging, SlideShare
      • Ease of communication among self-selected members
        • Facebook -- LinkedIn -- Twitter
      • For all Libraries: Development in the way information is created, distributed, cited, stored, archived, repurposed; has impact on privacy, legal and educational issues in libraries
      • Research Libraries: Specific development in the process of Scholarly Communication and Open Access movements
    Contributive Justice: How to promote Social Justice in a Social Web World
  • 14. Information Ethics & Social Justice: Lib 2.0
    • Why is Lib 2.0 important to Information Ethics?
    • Professional growth: knowing the “ Information Cycle”
    • Personal & Patron ICT Literacy:
      • Requires even more critical thinking / evaluation skills of users
      • Be familiar with new types of information management and research tasks necessary for current success
      • Future: increasingly changing Information & Communication Technologies
      • RSS marks the major difference between old “static” web content and dynamic web resources
      • Intellectual Property and privacy issues
      • Life-long learning!
    • Getting the word out: Low-cost distribution mechanism of information about library resources (ex; News, calendar, new books list, wiki updates, database/catalog searches, Journal TOCs)
    • Always fresh: Facilitating up-to-date information/ research
    • and interactive participation
  • 15. Information Ethics & Social Justice: Lib 2.0 -- LOC
    • Movement towards Social Web and Lib2.0
    • 1997-1999: scriptingNews format, designed by Dave Winer
    • 2000 : RSS 1.0 format is developed by Rael Dornfest at O’Reilly independently
    • January 2001 : Wikipedia launches (now 3, 282, 000 articles in English)
    • March 2002: “MetaWeblog powerful blogging API. “
    • September 2002: Winer Develops RSS 2.0 , MetaWeblog updates
    • May 2003 : LinkedIn launches (33Million members as of 4/2008; 65Million as of 4/2010)
    • July 2003 : RSS 2.0 spec, Winer “released CC license “ thru Harvard
    • February 2004: Flickr launches, Facebook debuts (Undergrads only)
    • August 2004: “iPodders” RSS (Winer& Curry) – podcasting begins
    • July 2005: iTunes supports podcasts , get 1 million subscribers in first 2 days; 8,000 podcasts & 6 million listeners in one month
    • March - August 2006: Initial - Public Launch of Twitter
    • June 9, 2007: LOC joins YouTube
    • January 16, 2008: Library of Congress uploads collections to Flickr
    • January 27, 2009: Library of Congress launches Twitter Account
    • April 2009: LOC launches YouTube Channel
    • June 30, 2009: LOC launches iTunesU channel
    • July 9, 2009: LOC launched Facebook page
    • April 14 2010: Library of Congress Acquires Entire Twitter Archive
    • Hobson and Holtz Report, 8/4/2005 http://forimmediaterelease.biz/index.php/weblog/2005/08/05/ )
    • RSS 2.0 at Harvard Law website, http://cyber.law.harvard.edu/rss/rssVersionHistory.html
  • 16.
    • Problems inherent in New Media – Global – UN COI (2010):
    • “ Language parity” & “digital divide” 
    • “ New Media” channels can reinforce, rather than ameliorate,
    • some sources of information poverty locally & in developing world.
    • wealthiest citizens, organizations & nations can take advantage of New Media to create and disseminate abundant information very quickly, and drown out already marginal voices .
    • Many calls for the “developed” areas to assist the underdeveloped with access to Information and Communications Technologies (ICT) and for infrastructure support and training
    Information Ethics & Social Justice: Lib 2.0 Literacies
  • 17. Information Ethics & Social Justice: Lib 2.0 Literacies NOTE: Johannes Britz: Research indicating phones will not bridge the digital divide
  • 18.
    • Rawls’ Liberties and New Media Political liberty (right to vote/hold office)
    Information Ethics & Social Justice: Lib 2.0 Literacies Mar 30, 2010, Hilton Collins Public CIO May 23, 2010 Doug Coleman "ReadWriteWeb
  • 19.
    • Rawls’ Liberties and New Media Political liberty – access to govt.
    Information Ethics & Social Justice: Lib 2.0 Literacies Informing Communities: Sustaining Democracy in the Digital Age KnightComm ission Apr 07, 2010
  • 20.
    • Rawls’ Liberties and New Media Freedom of speech/assembly
    Protest against dams (panama) and against G20 (PA) Information Ethics & Social Justice: Lib 2.0 Literacies
  • 21.
    • Rawls’ Liberties and New Media Liberty of conscience / freedom of thought/ Freedom of person & right to personal property
        • (freedom from arrest / seizure)
    Information Ethics & Social Justice: Lib 2.0 Literacies
  • 22.
    • Rawls’ Liberties and New Media Privacy
    • John Timmer | Last updated February 24, 2010 Ars Technica
    Information Ethics & Social Justice: Lib 2.0 Literacies
  • 23.
    • Rawls’ Liberties and New Media Tours using GeoPositioning
    Information Ethics & Social Justice: Lib 2.0 Literacies ICT privacy: FourSquare “Mayors”
  • 24.
    • Information Literacy and New Media: Attribution & Authority
    • Tweets and “RT” strings
    • Code “Lifting”
    • YouTube:
    • Music/Video mash-ups
    • GoogleImages
    • TinyURL
    • Misinformation
    • & Rumor
    • GoogleSquared
    Information Ethics & Social Justice: Lib 2.0 Literacies March 4, 2010. David Lat. Above The Law blog
  • 25.
    • Human dignity: as the basis
    • Community: Justice claims/codes, Common Good
    • Rights/duties: reciprocal, co-extensive,
      • but distribution of benefits/burdens not necessarily equal
    • Social Justice/ Information Ethics calls for:
      • Individual Responsibility
      • is not Charity
      • Is not merely “Optional” Volunteerism
      • Professional Responsibility
      • Continuing Education
      • Pro-Bono work?
      • Co-operation for common Good
      • ICT tutorials prior to Lib2.0 implementation
      • Learning and upholding Digital standards
    Information Ethics in a Lib 2.0 World
  • 26.
    • Some ideas for Professional Opportunities:
    • “ Language parity” work with Foreign Language Depts and agencies
    • Digital Divide & ICT – local, regional, state, national & Int’l Grants
    • Work with marginal voices to create and disseminate information
    • Research assistance regarding access to Information and Communications Technologies (ICT) and for infrastructure support.
    • Partnering with other libraries for literacy and ICT programs
    • ANTS tutorial repository
    • Championing Open Scholarship
    Information Ethics in a Lib 2.0 World
  • 27.
    • Some questions regarding current or future efforts:
    • What local projects are you currently working on?
    • (ex: Baltimore Library assists patrons with online order for groceries, and acts as a pick-up spot)
    • What projects do you need help with? What projects require research help across multiple disciplines?
    • (ex: FirstFindInfo – WLS compiles sites for adults with low literacy levels)
    • Do we need a clearing house for ideas/helpers?
    • (ex: Better World Books: acts as clearinghouse for withdrawn books, re-distributes print materials to libraries that lack ICT infrastructure, sell other books to fund literacy programs.
    Information Ethics in a Lib 2.0 World
  • 28. Information Ethics in a Lib 2.0 World Thank you for your time Kathryn Shaughnessy Instructional Services Librarian [email_address] LibGuide on Social Web & ICT literacy http://libguides.stjohns.edu/Social_web Links to sites in this presentation: http://delicious.com/kgshaughnessy/WLA_presentation