How to land you first job in journalism

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A presentation by Sharon Chan (Seattle Times) for a University of Washington journalism class on May 10, 2016.

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How to land you first job in journalism

  1. 1. LAND YOUR FIRST JOURNALISM JOB UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON SHARON PIAN CHAN 2016.05.10 a
  2. 2. 1. Big Hairy Audacious Goal
  3. 3. Picture yourself at 50  What do you want to be doing? Where do you want to be living? What kind of life do you want to be living?  You have to see it within yourself before others can see it.  This is your true North. (And true Norths can move.)
  4. 4. 2. ALL IT TAKES IS ONE
  5. 5. How I got my first job Pre-med in college Magazine summer internship 2 freelance jobs Magazine managing editor
  6. 6. Here is The One You are always interviewing for a future job Don’t burn your bridges Buy his books
  7. 7. 3. DEGREE ≠ JOB
  8. 8. Why Not having a degree guarantees you will not have a job. Hiring managers care little about you did at your college radio station/ newspaper/TV station. It’s your initiative and relationships that will get you your first job.
  9. 9. My next job Ready for a new job CCNMA job fair
  10. 10. My first day at The Seattle Times
  11. 11. Still here… 3-YEAR REPORTING RESIDENT TECH REPORTER HIGHER ED REPORTER CITY HALL REPORTER MICROSOFT REPORTER SENIOR DIGITAL NEWS PRODUCER ASSOCIATE OPINIONS EDITOR DIRECTOR OF JOURNALISM INITIATIVES DEPUTY MANAGING EDITOR
  12. 12. 4. FIND YOUR FLOCK
  13. 13. 5. BUILD A STRONG RESUME
  14. 14. The resume is a story about you
  15. 15. Your SAG (Specific Achievable Goal)
  16. 16. Do  Tell a story that builds up your skills and experience  Have a sense of direction (BHAG) and why this job is the next logical step  Be specific about your accomplishments. Remember PAR. Problem, Action and Results  Copy edit for AP style  Mention your flock!  Include a line about personal interests  PDF
  17. 17. Pet Peeves  Not targeted to the role  Listing of duties instead of accomplishments  Bad, crazy and boring designs  Not copy-edited  Overselling your experience  Fancy terms that don’t mean anything “successfully executed the desired outcome”
  18. 18. Bad  Too much design  Resume tells me nothing about her experience  Lacks a flow and narrative
  19. 19. Bad  Inconsistent layout  Too much color  Different type fonts and sizes
  20. 20. Boring  No design  Looks like the 500 other resumes I received today
  21. 21. Good  Has a visual hierarchy  Sub headlines allow for scanning  Mix of list and sentences  Contact info easy to fine
  22. 22. Good  Layout allow for easy scanning of info  Efficient use of space to pack in tons of info
  23. 23. Should you write a cover letter? YES!
  24. 24. 6. GET ONLINE
  25. 25. Build your digital presence  Website (LinkedIn works):  A description of you  Resume  Samples of your work  Social media links  Contact info  Public social media presence  Good photo  LinkedIn profile  Consistent voice
  26. 26. Example: Personal website
  27. 27. 7. MAKE SOME FRIENDS
  28. 28. Friending (aka networking)  Make some Super Friends (aka mentors) who have the job that you want
  29. 29. Super Friends can:  Give you career advice  Introduce you to other people  Give you feedback on your resume  Help you prepare for an interview/negotiate job offer  Help you figure out your next step  Provide inspiration!
  30. 30. 8. SHOW UP
  31. 31. 80% of success is showing up  Volunteer for journalism nonprofits: AAJA Seattle, Seattle Globalist  Help plan the AAJA Chef Showcase (email venicebuhain@gmail.com 1st meeting 5/14  Volunteer for The Globies on 10/14  Local (join the Facebook groups)  NW Journalists of Color Scholarship reception 6/2  National conventions  AAJA, NABJ, NAHJ, NAJA, ONA, SPJ, RTDNA. Volunteer or apply for scholarships to get in free, crash with a friend.
  32. 32. 9. FOLLOW UP
  33. 33. Send a card. A real one.
  34. 34. Social media: Follow, tweet, mention
  35. 35. Quarterly email check-in  Include what you’re up to, and what you’re looking for  Look for excuses to email: congratulations on an award, a job change, a story
  36. 36. 10. PAY IT FORWARD
  37. 37. Journalism is a small world  Help each other edit your resumes, websites, cover letters  Be each other’s sidekicks at networking events  When you land a job, mentor journalism students, speak to classes, help them find jobs
  38. 38. 10 tips 1. BHAG 2. All it takes is one 3. Degree ≠ Job 4. Find your flock 5. Build a strong resume 6. Get online 7. Make some friends 8. Show up 9. Follow up 10.Pay it forward
  39. 39. MORE READING Interviewing tips: http://bit.ly/1SZTtSe “Presence,” a book by Amy Cuddy. Her TED talk: http://bit.ly/amytedtalk “Show your work,” a book by Austin Kleon
  40. 40. THANK YOU! QUESTIONS? @sharonpianchan schan@seattletimes.com (206) 464-2958 Replay this presentation at: http://bit.ly/uwjournojobs

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