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The Future of Teaching the Past Digital Technologies and History Education  in the 21st Century National Council for Histo...
http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/cwphtml/cwphome.html
"Democratized access is the real payoff in electronic records and materials. It may be harder to preserve and organiz...
http://www.hewlett.org/Programs/Education/OER/
"OER are teaching, learning, and research resources that reside in the  public domain or have been released under an ...
http://teachinghistory.org
http://teachinghistory.org/history-content
The most successful educational uses of digital technology fall into three broad categories: - Inquiry-based learning util...
http://www.academiccommons.org/issue/january-2009
http://teachinghistory.org/issues-and-research/research-briefs
 
 
http://historicalthinkingmatters.org
 
 
 
 
 
http://zotero.org
 
 
http://www.flickr.com/commons
 
 
http://docs.google.com/
http://www.wordle.net/
 
http://matrix.msu.edu/~mmatrix/
http://objectofhistory.org/
 
 
 
 
http://digitalstoryteller.org
http://www.lmic.state.mn.us/ghol/
 
http://omeka.org
The Future of Teaching the Past Digital Technologies and History Education  in the 21st Century National Council for Histo...
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The Future of Teaching the Past: Digital Technologies and History Education in the 21st Century

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Slides from a keynote address at the National Council for History Education annual meeting in Boston (March 13, 2009).

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  • Transcript of "The Future of Teaching the Past: Digital Technologies and History Education in the 21st Century"

    1. 1. The Future of Teaching the Past Digital Technologies and History Education in the 21st Century National Council for History Education March 13, 2009 Sharon M. Leon [email_address]
    2. 2. http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/cwphtml/cwphome.html
    3. 3. "Democratized access is the real payoff in electronic records and materials. It may be harder to preserve and organize digital materials than it is paper records, but, once that is accomplished, they can be made accessible to vastly greater numbers of people. To open up the archives and libraries in this way democratizes historical work. Already, people who had never had direct access to archives and libraries can now enter. High school students are suddenly doing primary source research; genealogy has exploded in popularity because you no longer have to travel to distant archives." Roy Rosenzweig, “Scarcity or Abundance? Preserving the Past in a Digital Era,” The American Historical Review 108, no. 3 (June 2003). Paragraphs 56. http://www.historycooperative.org/journals/ahr/108.3/rosenzweig.html
    4. 4. http://www.hewlett.org/Programs/Education/OER/
    5. 5. "OER are teaching, learning, and research resources that reside in the public domain or have been released under an intellectual property license that permits their free use or re-purposing by others.3 Open educational resources include full courses, course materials, modules, textbooks, streaming videos, tests, software, and any other tools, materials, or techniques used to support access to knowledge." Dan Atkins, John Seely Brown, and Allen Hammond, A Review of the Open Educational Resources (OER) Movement (Hewlett Foundation: February 2007) p. 4.
    6. 6. http://teachinghistory.org
    7. 7. http://teachinghistory.org/history-content
    8. 8. The most successful educational uses of digital technology fall into three broad categories: - Inquiry-based learning utilizing primary sources available on CD-ROMS and the World Wide Web, and including the exploration of multimedia environments with potentially fluid combinations of text, image, sound, moving images in presentational and inquiry activities, involving different senses and forms of expression and addressing different learning styles; - Bridging reading and writing through on-line interaction, extending the time and space for dialogue and learning, and joining literacy with disciplinary and interdisciplinary inquiry; - Making student work public in new media formats, encouraging constructivist pedagogies through the creation and exchange of knowledge-representations, and creating opportunities for review by broader professional and public audiences. Randy Bass and Roy Rosenzweig, "Rewiring the History and Social Studies Classroom: Needs, Frameworks, Dangers, and Proposals," White Paper for Department of Education, Forum on Technology in K-12 Education: Envisioning a New Future, December 1, 1999. [http://chnm.gmu.edu/resources/essays/d/26]
    9. 9. http://www.academiccommons.org/issue/january-2009
    10. 10. http://teachinghistory.org/issues-and-research/research-briefs
    11. 13. http://historicalthinkingmatters.org
    12. 19. http://zotero.org
    13. 22. http://www.flickr.com/commons
    14. 25. http://docs.google.com/
    15. 26. http://www.wordle.net/
    16. 28. http://matrix.msu.edu/~mmatrix/
    17. 29. http://objectofhistory.org/
    18. 34. http://digitalstoryteller.org
    19. 35. http://www.lmic.state.mn.us/ghol/
    20. 37. http://omeka.org
    21. 38. The Future of Teaching the Past Digital Technologies and History Education in the 21st Century National Council for History Education March 13, 2009 Sharon M. Leon [email_address]
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