Management? But I'm an Historian

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  • 15 minutes
  • 5 minutesDrafting of job descriptions: what is the existing job and what would they like to be doing?How does this relate to the need at hand?
  • 5 minutesEnvironment is really important: creating a welcoming space for innovation
  • 5 minutes;
  • 10 minutes; 30 minutes drafting
  • 30 minutesRead the Guidelines!!! Necessary fictions because of the timing and the way that the work unfolds, but do your best to make it honestBudget worksheet – imagine the work and the people doing it (time and money)NEH Preservation and AccessNHPRCIMLS NLG
  • 30 minutes; 15 drafting
  • 30 minutes; 30 minutes draftingTwo sample workplansBasecamp, Trello, Kona, Podio,
  • 45 minutesCommunication: Availability, cc/bcc/subject line alerts, project management software messagingMeetings: Standing meetings (work for the day, blockers, questions) (10 minutes) Paired programming/ working groups; Larger meetings must have a pre-circulated agenda and notes and next stepsProblems and issues?
  • 30 minutes; 15 minutes closingWork plan should help with deliverablesBudget tracking is important (even if you have an office of sponsored programs, you are the responsible party)
  • Management? But I'm an Historian

    1. 1. Management? But I’m an Historian Sharon M. Leon Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media sharonmleon@gmail.com @sleonchnm January 2, 2014
    2. 2. Overview • Outline: – Why Project Management – Resource Assessment – Project Proposals (Necessary Fictions) – Launching a Project – Personnel – Functional Work Plans – Reporting and Wrapping up a project
    3. 3. Introductions: Everyday vs. Special Projects • Existing management responsibilities? • Existing project ideas? – Rescuing or Hatching? • Failed Projects: Why?
    4. 4. Project Manager as Leader • Project Manager offers – Clear Communication – Motivation – Oversight – Accountability – Clean-up All of this requires trust and cooperation.
    5. 5. Resource Assessment: Staff • Are we getting the most out of the people we work with? – Existing skills – Hard won experience – Emerging interests – Capacity to learn and lead – Collaboration
    6. 6. Resource Assessment: Infrastructure • Physical Space – Individual workspaces – Collaborative areas – Whiteboards • Hardware access (computers, servers) – IT staff and support
    7. 7. Resource Assessment: Partners • Collaborators – Full partners who contribute to through the lifecycle of the project – Continuous consultation and ongoing work • Advisors – Trusted and experienced members of the field • Subcontractors (work for hire) • Community resources (outreach & support)
    8. 8. Resource Assessment: Time • Pilot projects and Estimating – Survey of the full scope of the work – Selection of a portion for processing – Roughing out a workflow/design/architecture – Extrapolating to the whole • Accounting for increasing efficiency overtime • Anticipating particularly difficult areas – Padding for safety
    9. 9. Project Proposals (Necessary Fictions) • Needs, Outcomes, Deliverables – Standards in the field/Requirements • • • • • • Schedule Staffing Budget Advisory Boards, Consultation Evaluation Outreach and Publicity
    10. 10. Launching a Project • Project Charters – Needs, deliverables, outcomes – Staff: key roles and responsibilities – Schedule (functional work plan) (Sounds like a grant proposal, doesn’t it?)
    11. 11. Functional Work Plans • Anticipating roadblocks (and removing them) • Using Project Management Software – Overview of the work – Public accountability – Collaborative space • Deliverables -> Milestones • Milestones -> ToDos • Messages, Documents, Files
    12. 12. Personnel • Shared Communication Norms – Email, IM, etc. – Overlap Hours • Meeting Procedures – Size and frequency – Agendas – Notes and follow-up • Personalities – Time management – Coworker relations • Evaluation – Honesty is essential – Formal and informal
    13. 13. Reporting • External Stakeholders – Deliver on time and on budget – Use is one of the best metrics of success • Internal Stakeholders – What lessons does the project team take forward? – How has the staff grown? • What if the project didn’t go well?

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