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New Roles, New Courses: Language Programs and Campus internationalization

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Presentation given at ACTFL 2011 by Sharon Scinicariello, Mary Beth Barth, and Cynthia Evans with contributions from Jan Marston.

Presentation given at ACTFL 2011 by Sharon Scinicariello, Mary Beth Barth, and Cynthia Evans with contributions from Jan Marston.

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  • Founded in 1973--so Hamilton College was one of the early adopters. Created a model based on directed self-instruction which provided colleges and universities with a viable way to complement and expand their language offerings and give students the opportunity to study additional languages--in particular the lctls Adhere very closely to the NASILP model --for good reason--it is very effective--with some modification and variation --one can tailor to one ’s own campus, culture, needs.....for example the name of the program, whether or not they are credit-bearing, fulfill a language requirement. Hamilton Colleges-CLP, students receive regular course credit, satisfies language requirements for majors (we do not have a college wide language requirement) Many schools simply call their programs SILP--Davidson and Vassar Colleges. Grinnell College--ALSO Alternative Language Study Option, Yale-DILS Directed Independent Language Study. Alex Dunkel- Professor of Russian As a member school you have access to assistance from the NASILP office and resources posted on the website. In addition there is a Conference day and a half---always a nuts and bolts session,very productive NASILP provides an excellent Model which has certainly served Hamilton very well for over thirty years and many other colleges and universities have depended on it to complement their traditional language depts and enrich their language curriculum. Stood the test of time and in fact was ahead of its time. Nasilp was very forward thinking thirty years ago concerning so many aspects, not only in regard to language learning but learning in general -supporting the lctls -recognizing students ’ ability to be self-directed, successful language learners and the importance of creating a learner-centered environment that fosters the development of life-long learning skills -understood the importance of technology and making it an integral, not peripheral part of the learning process -focusing on verbal acquisition and making that the priority (responded to what many students really want in terms of desired outcomes when they enroll in a language course) -NASILP way ahead of the curve --mainstream education was barely discussing, let alone implementing any of this thirty years ago-- Nasilp really took the lead in so many areas. -INNOVnnovative and effective then and is more timely than ever now--in step with current thinking and directions in language study
  • mid 70s, 80s enriches and strenghtens language study at Hamilton--heightens visibility of language study on campus
  • -the same original 4 plus C & J -CLP has added Hebrew and Hindi -Chinese and Japanese enrollments outgrew CLP So the CLP continues to enrich and strengthen our language offerings at Hamilton and compliment the traditional language depts. Turkish, Korean---------Indonesian,Portuguese Spoken Greek,Swedish, Polish
  • Director--the person responsible for overseeing all aspects of the program-- Examiner--a professor of the language at an accredited college or university--administers the exams and at Hamilton determines the final course grade Tutor--at Hamilton generally an international student Student --at Hamilton students do not need to have taken a prior college level language course, have a certain gpa, need a recommendation from a language professor etc Materials--textbook --a strong technology component
  • -This IS a Self Instructional Program--but it is highly structured and supervised -While the TERM self-instruction may sound like a lonely endeavor --quite the opposite. I work very closely with the tutors and the students -It is a collaborative approach--actually very very personalized -Much monitoring and mentoring interwoven throughout the semester (Students--discuss study strategies,importance of practice...Tutors-lesson plans, Class visits) Class visits--the dreaded, then when are stopping by---a collaborative effort--classes are dress rehearsals for the final play and we ’re all working together to impress the examiner ------ -Expectations and goals are clearly outlined ------- 3x/weekly regularly scheduled classes Class size-an EXXXcellent feature of the Program--Maximizes participation and engages all students --no back row ----- -native speaker-- Tutors function is to provide a model, correction and feedback -AND a context for task-based, communicative activities based on the material assigned. ----- --Application not Analysis We ’re speaking the language, not talking about it. Understanding something and being able to do it are two very different things. --Classes are an opportunity for students to practice in a live context what they have practiced with technology -- Serve to measure progress and give feedback and correction -- Highly interactive -------- -Priority is on verbal communication. The goal is to learn to speak the language (writing as a study stategy) -------- -A Performance-based exam. -Students need to demonstrate evidence of mastery of the material-competency -Students know the outcomes they are responsible for and that the midterm and final exam will measure these.
  • Impact has been significant!!!! And more so now than ever!! Students- --Opportunity to study new languages--greatly enriched the language offerings. --Students love this --feel they are really learning a new language--attain a higher level of verbal proficiency (challenging and hard work--but worthwhile---In conversations w/students, the response is very favorable. ) Spoken proficiency--conversations with students and anecdotes bear this out--students returning... --Students learn a lot about themselves as learners--often surprise themselves---quite transformative --more confident in their own learning abilities --have experienced new type of engagement/awaremenss of what they bring to the learning process--a sense of ownership --working with a peer --someone they may otherwise not have had the opportunity to with much -Students need to be engaged--this generation of students in particular learn by doing . Course is a dynamic learning environment--seems pertinent, relevant real, fresh to them. Student ’s perspective is important!!! -Time well spent. Curricular-- -Enriched and strengthened language study at Hamilton, provided a avenue for low-enrollment languages -Can evolve as needs change --can be shaped by the real world and reflect current needs and students interests -The CLP at Hamilton definitely contributes to cultivating and fostering interest in studying world languages and creating a culture on campus that supports language study . Enhances visibility of language study and interest in study abroad, highlights what an invaluable addition linguistically and culturally our international students are --Demonstrates to the campus that languages are engaged in innovative thinking and undertakings--it is a unique program on campus and students and tutors are well respected.
  • Impact has been significant!!!! And more so now than ever!! Students- --Opportunity to study new languages--greatly enriched the language offerings. --Students love this --feel they are really learning a new language--attain a higher level of verbal proficiency (challenging and hard work--but worthwhile---In conversations w/students, the response is very favorable. ) Spoken proficiency--conversations with students and anecdotes bear this out--students returning... --Students learn a lot about themselves as learners--often surprise themselves---quite transformative --more confident in their own learning abilities --have experienced new type of engagement/awaremenss of what they bring to the learning process--a sense of ownership --working with a peer --someone they may otherwise not have had the opportunity to with much -Students need to be engaged--this generation of students in particular learn by doing . Course is a dynamic learning environment--seems pertinent, relevant real, fresh to them. Student ’s perspective is important!!! -Time well spent. Curricular-- -Enriched and strengthened language study at Hamilton, provided a avenue for low-enrollment languages -Can evolve as needs change --can be shaped by the real world and reflect current needs and students interests -The CLP at Hamilton definitely contributes to cultivating and fostering interest in studying world languages and creating a culture on campus that supports language study . Enhances visibility of language study and interest in study abroad, highlights what an invaluable addition linguistically and culturally our international students are --Demonstrates to the campus that languages are engaged in innovative thinking and undertakings--it is a unique program on campus and students and tutors are well respected.
  • Many components of self-instruction dovetail w current thinking on campuses: -more schools interested in adding languages, in particular the CLPS-- and exploring non-traditional ways of doing it— -more emphasis on exploring effective methods to attain higher proficiency in languages -increased awareness of global issues, need for our students to become global citizens through multicultural and international programs and perspectives and study abroad -So a stronger commitment to world languages and cultural awareness anad to improving not only our language abilitities, but our intercultural proficiency
  • Transcript

    • 1. New Roles, New Courses : Language Programs and Campus Internationalization ACTFL 2011 Denver, Colorado
    • 2. Campus Internationalization
      • The process of further integrating an international and intercultural dimension into the teaching, research, and service functions of the institution.
      • Goal:  create 'globally proficient students'
    • 3. Internationalization Strategies
      • Clemson University Task Force (very typical)
        • Marketing and promotion
        • Programming for the international community
        • Academic internationalization
          • Languages never mentioned
        • Study abroad
        • Attaining a higher rank in global rankings of universities
      • Languages are never mentioned, but successful international exchanges, study abroad, and cross-cultural service learning projects require communicative competencies and cultural knowledge often best acquired through language learning.
    • 4. Internationalization Indicators
      • from a draft document by C. Eugene Allen at the University of Minnesota, University International Center
      • Emphasis on international and cross-cultural exchanges and activities
      • Emphasis on international research, workshops, and study
      • Numerous majors have foreign language and/or cross-cultural communications as a degree requirement
      • Foreign languages are mentioned but not seen as essential.
    • 5. Challenges
        • Provide instruction in LCTLs
          • Students preparing for or returning from study abroad and for students in area studies
        • Provide discipline-based language learning
          • Students who want ‘real-world’ links
          • Faculty who participate in international projects
        • Provide non-traditional instruction
          • Faculty and staff participating in internationalization efforts need to revive language skills or acquire new languages
    • 6.  
    • 7. Panelists
        • Mary Beth Barth Hamilton College [email_address] NASILP
        • Cindy Evans Skidmore College [email_address] CLAC Consortium
        • Sharon Scinicariello University of Richmond [email_address] Breaking Down Barriers
        • with contributions from Jan Marston (Drake University) [email_address] Virtual Language Studies
    • 8. Virtual Handout
      • https://sites.google.com/site/workshopsandpresentations/home/actfl-2011
    • 9. Expanding Language Offerings Using the NASILP Model Mary Beth Barth Hamilton College
    • 10. National Association of Self-Instructional Language Programs (NASILP)
        • A professional organization founded in 1973 to foster self-instructional academic programs in the less-commonly taught languages (LCTLs)
        • Over 120 member institutions
        • Administered by an Executive Director with the Association's day-to-day business conducted through the Secretariat at The University of Arizona
        • Member resources include a Secretariat, a website, and an annual conference late October in Washington D.C.
        • Provides an excellent, academically rigorous model
    • 11.
      • CLP Courses:
        • Chinese
        • Japanese
        • Italian
        • Swahili
        • Arabic
      • Traditional Courses:
        • French
        • Spanish
        • German
        • Russian
      Hamilton College ’s Languages in CLP ’s Early Years
    • 12.
      • CLP Courses:
        • Arabic
        • Italian
        • Hebrew
        • Swahili
        • Hindi
      Hamilton College ’s Current Languages
      • Traditional Courses:
        • French
        • Spanish
        • German
        • Russian
        • Chinese
        • Japanese
    • 13. Key Components of a NASILP Model
        • Director/Program Coordinator
        • Examiner
        • Tutor/Conversation Partner/Language Partner
        • Student
        • Course Materials (Texts and Technology)
    • 14. NASILP Pedagogical Overview
        • Supervised self-instructional format (Not self-paced)
        • Emphasis on student as a responsible, self-aware learner
        • Small classes (5-7 max) scheduled three times weekly with a native speaker
        • Native speaker ’s role as a model for creative practice and correction
        • Classes are conducted in the target language (Focus on language use, not analysis)
        • Emphasis on functional spoken, reading, and listening competencies (Less priority on writing)
        • Final course grade determined by the midterm and final exams administered by a qualified outside examiner
    • 15. CLP ’s Impact on Hamilton’s Students
        • Additional language course offerings
        • Priority on spoken proficiency
        • Discovery of learning potential
        • Development of lifelong learning skills
        • Interaction with international students
        • Appeals to students ’ interests, learning styles and goals
    • 16. CLP ’s Impact on Hamilton’s Curriculum
        • Expansion and enrichment of the language curriculum
        • Ability to respond as curricular and student needs change
        • Heightens awareness and visibility of other languages and cultures
        • Implementation of innovative pedagogy and technology
    • 17. NASILP: Thirty Years Ahead of Its Time
        • Recognition of importance of the LCTLs
        • Emphasis on Verbal Proficiency
        • Integration of Technology
        • Student Centered
    • 18. The Time is Right: SILP Model in Sync with Contemporary Students and Directions
        • World languages, particularly the LCTLs
        • Focus on verbal proficiency and communicative ability
        • Life-long learning skills
        • Area studies, internationalizing the curriculum 
        • Study abroad
    • 19.  
    • 20. Cindy Evans, Ph.D. Skidmore College The Challenge of Internationalizing the Disciplines
    • 21. CLAC Rationale
        • Interdisciplinarity
        • Globalization of the curricula
        • Experiencing the discipline through a different cultural & linguistic perspective.
        • Promoting language proficiency through a disciplinary focus.
    • 22. LAC Program models
      • Variables:  
        • faculty-directed / learner-centered
        • language / discipline focus
      • Examples
        • Non-language faculty integrate material in class (Earlham)
        • Faculty teams develop LAC section for target course (St. Olaf)
        • TA ’s develop LAC sections (SUNY-Binghamton / UNC-Chapel Hill)
        • Fully integrated L2 + target area (University of Rhode Island)
        • L2-based learner-centered model (Skidmore)
      •  
    • 23. What is LAC?
      •  
      Offered by FL faculty Course offered by non-FL departments Curriculum focused on L2 Curriculum focused on content LAC sometimes   X X CBI X X X LSP X X
    • 24. CLAC resources
        • CLAC Consortium website
        • CLAC Consortium blog & listserv
        • 
 Online discussions “CLAC in the Cloud”
        • Annual Conferences (U. of Minnesota, March 9-10, 2012)
    • 25. LAC at Skidmore
      •  
    • 26.  
    • 27.  
    • 28.  
    • 29.  
    • 30.  
    • 31.  
    • 32. Breaking Down Barriers Sharon Scinicariello University of Richmond
    • 33. Virtual Language Studies: Interactive Mandarin Chinese & Russian Classes Online leveraging twenty-first century technologies for learners of LCTLs Jan Marston
    • 34. Technical Structure  for Virtual Language Studies
    • 35. WordPress
    • 36. Beginning Russian in Moodle
    • 37. Adobe Connect Classroom: Interactive Video
    • 38. The Good, The Bad, and The Ugly
      • • Where you are located doesn't matter
      • • Small groups encourage talking & active participation
      • • Published blogs/ePortfolios build confidence & competence
      • • Building long-term relationships across the world is facilitated
      • • Quality of videoconference dependent on quality of Internet connection
      • • All participants - faculty, native speaker-mentors, and students - must take responsibility for their own connection
      • • Faculty must work collaboratively
      • • Tech support a must
    • 39. Barriers to Break Down
        • Time and space
          • Use technology to take advantage of remote resources, including human ones
          • Network with colleagues in other locations
        • Academic ‘silos’
          • Language-literature
          • Departments
          • Graduate and professional schools
          • Support units (IS/IT, Library, HR)
        • Misperception
          • Outdated, ‘ivory tower’ curriculum
          • No data about results
    • 40. Offer Services to Address Needs
        • Study Abroad
          • Resources and/or courses for language preparation, maintenance, improvement
          • Workshops on using resources
        • CLAC and Other International Courses
          • Targeted e-mail to faculty teaching CLAC sections
          • Collaboration with CLAC administration
          • Short workshops and one-on-one consultations on using resources
        • Computing Infrastructure (LRCs)
          • Advocate multilingual infrastructure solutions
          • Volunteer to test proposed systems
          • Become the 'help desk' for multilingual computing
    • 41. Become Essential
        • Change the perception of our role on campus
          • We are not the 'drill and practice' language learning of old
          • We serve everyone on campus--not just those enrolled in language programs
          • We get results and can prove it through assessment
        • Marketing and promotion
          • Student newspaper
          • Faculty and staff newsletters
          • New student orientation
          • New faculty orientation
    • 42. The Goal
      • Be the first place members of the campus community turn when they need help with language issues.
      • It's a slow process but worth the effort.
    • 43. Thank you!
    • 44. Virtual Handout
      • https://sites.google.com/site/workshopsandpresentations/home/actfl-2011

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