SPORTS PSYCHOLOGY IN SPORTS MEDICINE

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  • Ballet teacher example of tracking growth charts
  • Denies self image problems
    Question of Father as coach in HS
    ? Family issues
  • Calcium, vit d and OCP discussed ortho tricyclin
    OCP started
  • 4 concussions with no brain rest, 10 hours/day of video games
    3 serious concussions, never told anyone about ATV accident; symptomatic after all three; current return to play decision; chornic headaches, depression, loss of sleep
    10 year-old cheerleader; precocious; very quick skill advancement; threw a move and “caused” a concussion in a 16 year old teammate
  • SPORTS PSYCHOLOGY IN SPORTS MEDICINE

    1. 1. Sport Psychology in Sports Medicine Continuing Education Workshop AASP 2009 Sharon A. Chirban, Ph.D. Sport Psychologist Division of Sports Medicine Children’s Hospital Boston Harvard Medical School
    2. 2. Sports Medicine
    3. 3. QuickTime™ and a decompressor are needed to see this picture.
    4. 4. QuickTime™ and a decompressor are needed to see this picture.
    5. 5.  Youth Sports – Less Free Play – Greater Intensity – Higher Competitive Levels – Single Sport Focus – Parents, Coaches, Scouts – $ – Goals: Kids vs Adults
    6. 6.  Benefits of Youth Exercise – Medical • Obesity • Diabetes • Cardiovascular risk • Bone Health – Psychosocial • Self-esteem • Teen Pregnancy • Recreational Drug Use
    7. 7.  Pediatric Athlete – “Child is not a little adult.” – “Child athlete is not a little adult athlete.”
    8. 8.  First & Foremost Pediatric Sports Medicine Clinic – 20,000 patient visits per year – 2,500 surgeries per year  Staff – Orthopaedic Surgeons – Primary Care Physicians – Sports Podiatrists • Athletic Trainers • Sports Pyschology • Nutritionists • Exercise Physiology Introduction Division of Sports Medicine
    9. 9.  Research – Clinical Research • ACL Injuries • Osteochondritis Dissecans • Stress Fractures • Spondylolysis • Rugby Injuries – Basic Science • ACL primary healing Introduction Division of Sports Medicine
    10. 10.  Community Outreach – School Coverage • 6 Colleges • 18 High Schools – Boston Public Schools Sports Medicine Initiative – Boston Ballet – Performing Arts – Track & Field – Baystate Games – Sports Camps – US Figure Skating Introduction Division of Sports Medicine
    11. 11. Overview of Workshop  The role of a sports psychologist in treating sports medicine patients  Discuss issues around professional development and integration  Discuss working in a medical milieu and working on a treatment team  An overview of sports medicine clinical topics  Case presentations will be used as a teaching tool for participants.
    12. 12. Role of a sports psychologist in treating sports medicine patients  SP is licensed within Sports Medicine Department  SP works in coordination with primary care sports med physicians, orthopedic surgeons, physical therapists, athletic trainers, nutritionists, fellows and interns in training  Associated University affiliation coverage  Event Coverage
    13. 13. Clinical Issues in Sports Medicine Acute Injuries vs Overuse Injuries
    14. 14. Acute Injury  Fracture  Contusion  Sprain  Strain  Concussion
    15. 15. Overuse Injury  Stress Fracture  Tendinopathy  Chondromalacia  Bursitis  Fascitis
    16. 16. Risk Factors •Host •Environmental
    17. 17. Risk Factors: Sport Injuries HOST  Anatomic Alignment  Muscle Tendon Imbalance  Fitness Level  Growth and Maturation  Nutrition  Gender
    18. 18. Risk Factors: Sport Injuries ENVIRONMENTAL  Training  Conditioning  Surface  Footwear  Equipment  Coaching
    19. 19. Training: Environmental Factor  Sports Training – The young athlete – How much is too much? – How much is enough?
    20. 20. Overtraining  Performance  Fatigue  Growth  Endocrine  Injury
    21. 21. Overuse Syndrome  Types of Training  Amount of Training  Rate of Training
    22. 22. Case Report  15 year-old “Clara”  Boston Ballet  Chronic back pain  RSD/Perfectionistic Personality  Two years of counseling  Back to ballet
    23. 23. Female Athlete Triad  Amennorhea  Osteopenia  Disordered Eating Overuse Injury: Stress Fracture
    24. 24. Cases  Eating Disordered Athletes – Karyn  Athletes with Eating Disorders – Boston College Runner
    25. 25. Preadmission Information Summer 2003 17 year old Cross country scholarship athlete was preparing to matriculate September 2003 Coaches intercepted series of photos on the internet
    26. 26. Female Athlete Triad Pierre d’Hemecourt, MD
    27. 27. Preadmission Information Summer 2003 17 year old Cross country scholarship athlete was preparing to matriculate September 2003 Coaches intercepted Series of photos on the internet
    28. 28. September 2002 (Senior High School Year)
    29. 29. November 2002 (Senior High School Year)
    30. 30. January 2003 (Senior High School Year)
    31. 31. June 2003 (Senior High School Year)
    32. 32. Preparticipation Evaluation PMD office notes 2/03 wt = 110 PMD office notes 7/14 wt = 90 Initial evaluation 8/25/03 No hx of eating disorder or depression HX of elevated cholesterol Hx lactose intolerance Menarche at age 15 but no menses since August 2002 Denies purge
    33. 33. Initial Lab EKG normal with QT interval 0.4 HCT/ Hgb = 39.1/14.1 BUN/Cr =15/.8 Chol=249, Tg = 149 LFT’s normal Estradiol<32 LH<.7 TSH = 3.5 Free thyroxin =.7 Prolactin: 6.06 ng/mL PTH = 37 25- OHD=28 Ca 9.9 MG 2.2
    34. 34. Decision Home vs. intense care on campus Contract signed that stipulated: Weekly Health Service visits Weekly gain of 1-2 lb (wts in shorts and tank top) Weekly Counseling Counseling Nutrition Medical Monitoring ATC
    35. 35. Freshman Year 1st SemesterDate Weight Urine SG Comments 9/5 86 1.003 9/12 87 1.005 9/16 90.5 1.004 Roommate trouble 9/30 95.25 1.008 Roommate trouble 10/7 96.25 1.006 Start Wt training Light run 10/17 98 1.004 10/25 98 1.001 Run 5 mi
    36. 36. Freshman 2nd Semester Date Weight Urine SG Comments 1/16 103.5 BMI= 19.6 1.020 Cleared for Track Limit 40 mi/wk 2/16 106.5 1.023 3/05 104 1.019 3/16 102 1.020 Warned 3/23 103 1.017 Mild T-L pain→PT 4/20 104 1.117 Pain Cleared 5/5/04 104 1.023 Thoracic and
    37. 37. Bone Scan Sacral Stress fracture Mild compressions at T7 and T8
    38. 38. Summer 04 (Freshman-Sophomore) No running for 2 months July started running 10 mi/ wk Saw orthopedist for recurrent pain in early August and MRI showed new right sacral stress fracture Started her on Actonel 35 mg per week Instructed to not run for 3 months:
    39. 39. Sophomore Year 1st SemesterDate Weight Urine SG Comments 9/08/04 104.5 10/07 104 1.017 Noted to cry a lot 11/9 99.75 1.019 Run 15 min QOD 11/16 100 1.022 ETOH/? Purge 11/23 100 BMI= 18.9 1.025 12/17 101 Run 35 min 3x/wk
    40. 40. Sophomore Year 2nd SemesterDate Weight Urine SG Comments 1/21/05 110 1.015 Great Affect Mild sacral pain MRI (-) 2/2 108 No Pain 2/18 108 Runs 37 mi/ wk Mild intermittent non impact pain through the semester but tolerated increased running to 40 mi wk. Some alcohol abuse was reported. That summer developed a tibial plateaux non displaced stress fracture
    41. 41. Summer Sophomore- Junior Year That summer developed a tibial plateau non displaced stress fracture fracture and cross trained all summer
    42. 42. Junior Year 1st Semester No pain on return, normal exam including jump test Uneventful semester maintaining wt at 110 with minimal pain Ran modified with team, about 4 times per week to a max of 25 miles per wk
    43. 43. Junior Year 2nd Semester DEXA repeated and showed increased density Hip ↑ 4.4% to Z score of -1.2 Lumbar ↑ 2.2% (not clinically significant) to Z -2.1 Stable weight about 115 Some hip and tibia pain with a normal bone scan in February Progressed to 50 miles per wk.
    44. 44. Senior Year 2006-2007 Maintained her wt well Running about 40 mi/wk November developed a left tibial stress fracture Now with right
    45. 45. Female Athlete Triad Studies have found that 15 to 62% of female college athletes have disordered eating. 3.4 to 66% of female athletes are amenorrheic. At least 90% of peak bone mass is
    46. 46. Female Athlete Triad OLD THEORY Disordered eating and/or excessive exercise → Low body weight and low body fat → Amenorrhea → Low estrogen → Decreased calcium absorption and utilization → Low bone density
    47. 47. Negative Energy Balance → Disruption of HPO axis Leptin polypeptide secreted by adipocytes, with receptors on hypothalamus and bone!1 Helps regulate food intake, energy expenditure, growth, sexual maturation, and likely GnRH/LH pulsitility.2 Evidence of absence of diurnal leptin levels in amenorrheic, high level athletes.3 Possible negative central effects and positive peripheral effects.4 1 Bradley SJ, Taylor MJ, Rovet JF, et al. Assessment of brain function in adolescent anorexia nervosa before and after weight gain. J Clin Exper Neuropsych 19(1): 20-33, 1997. 2 Cheung CC, Thornton JE, Kuijper JL, et al. Leptin is a metabolic gate for the onset of puberty in the female rat. Endocrinology 138(2):855-8, 1997. 3 Laughlin GA, Yen SCC. Hypoleptinemia in women athletes: absence of diurnal rhythm with amenorrhea. J Clin Endocrinol Metab 82(1):318-21, 1997. 4 Burguera B, Hofbauer LC, Thomas T, et al. Leptin reduces ovariectomy-induced bone loss in rats. Endocrinology 142(8):3546-53, 2001.
    48. 48. IMPROVING DETECTION OF Awareness in PPEs: Menstrual History History of Stress Fractures Calcium Intake and Vitamin D intake Frequent Follow-up: Labs and radiologic testing More extensive H & P: Mood, Stressors, Diet, Cardiac exam, Tanner stage, Hair growth
    49. 49. IMPROVING TREATMENT OF Medical/Nutritional/Psychiatric Teamwork Coach/Trainer/Athletic Department/Family support and awareness
    50. 50. IMPROVING TREATMENT OF Hormonal Therapy- Currently NO pharmacologic tx approved by FDA for premenopausal women that improve bone formation. Future Options?: Bisphosphonates (ex: Fosamax, Actonel, Boniva) Selective Estrogen Receptor Modulators (SERMs- ex. Raloxifene and Tamoxifene) Parathyroid analogs (ex: Forteo) Black Cohosh- animal studies and human osteoblasts (osteoprotegrin) Leptin
    51. 51. Thank You
    52. 52. Fitness: Environmental Risk Factor  Cardiovascular/Metabolic  Musculoskeletal – Strength – Flexibility – Endurance  Body Composition  Psychological
    53. 53. Head Injuries Post Concussive Syndrome Delayed response Distracted Disoriented Coordination issues Emotional lability Memory deficit Amnesia
    54. 54. Second Impact Syndrome SIS Occurs mostly in the adolescent 14-16 A second head injury(often minor) is sustained while still symptomatic from the first injury Altered cerebral autoregulation ⇒malignant brain edema Stable for 15 seconds to minutes ⇒precipitous collapse, comatose, respiratory failure Rapid intubation and osmotic diuresis(mannitol)
    55. 55. Cantu 1986American Academy of Neurology Grade I -No LOC, amnesia < 30 minutes Grade II - LOC < 5min or amnesia > 30 min but < 24 hrs Grade III -LOC > 5 min or amnesia > 24 hrs Grade I- No LOC, transient confusion less than 15 minutes Grade II- No LOC, transient confusion more than 15 min Grade III- LOC
    56. 56. AAN Return to Play Guidelines Grade I: May return to play if symptoms clear within 15 minutes Grade II: Terminate contest. May return to play if no symptoms on exertion for one week Grade III: Terminate contest. May return to play after one week without symptoms if LOC < 1 min or 2 weeks if LOC > 1min (consider hospital evaluation)
    57. 57. Return to Play with a Second Concussion Grade I: Terminate contest and return after one week without symptoms at rest and exertion Grade II: Terminate contest and return after 2 weeks without symptoms at rest and exertion Grade III: Return after one month without symptoms at rest and exertion
    58. 58. Return To Play Recommend injury grading in retrospect Symptom scores Question the significance of loss of consciousness Significance of amnesia Pediatric considerations
    59. 59. Symptom Scores Headache Neck pain Balance or dizziness Nausea Visual difficulty Hearing abnormally Dazed Confused Feeling confused Feeling in a fog Drowsiness Fatigue Emotional lability Difficulty concentration Difficulty remembering Trouble sleeping
    60. 60. Concussion Cases Nick soccer player Hannah hockey Player Gigi cheerleader
    61. 61. Upper Extremity Overuse Shoulder Syndromes Labal tears: popping Instability: subluxation or dead arm feeling Impingement: painful arch Biceps tendonitis: anterior pain AC joint: impingement
    62. 62. Upper Extremity Overuse Swimmers Shoulder Constellation of instability and impingement Training may require 10 to 15 thousand yards per day. 75% of this may be freestyle McMaster and Troup found shoulder pain in: 10% of age 13- 14 13% of age 15- 16 26% of elite college swimmers
    63. 63. Upper Extremity Overuse Swimmers Shoulder Inflammation in the supraspinatus and/or biceps tendons usually caused by glenohumeral instability Supraspinatus ischemia at the end of the pull phase
    64. 64. Upper Extremity Overuse Swimmers Shoulder Diagnosis History of pain at which part of the stroke Signs of impingement and instability Signs of rotator cuff weakness and inflexibility
    65. 65. Upper Extremity Overuse Swimmers Shoulder Treatment Relative rest but not deconditioned Some pool work Address rotator cuff stabilization
    66. 66. Upper Extremity Overuse Swimmers Shoulder Treatment Technique: 1)Finish of the stroke so that the arm exits the water at the iliac crest 2)Roll 70- 90 degrees 3) Entry just outside the line of the shoulder
    67. 67. Upper Extremity Overuse Swimmers Shoulder Prevention 10% rule for increase in volume of time and intensity Weight train with attention to the rotator cuff Cross training
    68. 68. Make it or Break it

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