How to Map Your Instruction in 4 Simple Steps
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By Sharon Bowman. How to Map Your Instruction. A simple 4-step instructional design tool for teachers, trainers, educators, and instructors.

By Sharon Bowman. How to Map Your Instruction. A simple 4-step instructional design tool for teachers, trainers, educators, and instructors.

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How to Map Your Instruction in 4 Simple Steps Presentation Transcript

  • 1. For:instructors, educators, teachers and trainers By: Sharon Bowmanwww.Bowperson.com
  • 2. shows you whereyou are goingand the bestway to get there.
  • 3. The 4Cs MAP isan instructionaldesign tool thatwill show you andthe learners wherethe instruction isgoing and thesteps to get there.
  • 4. Linesand Signs
  • 5. Use lines to divide yourpaper into 4 sections. These are examples of some of the ways you can do it.
  • 6. Label each sectionwith a “sign.” C1 C2 Connections Concepts C3 Concrete C4 Practice Conclusions Now you’re ready to use your 4Cs MAP.
  • 7. Why is it important to use an instructional design tool when teaching or training others? Choose 2 answers, then click to the next slide to see if you are correct.A. To show other people that you are organized.B. To help meet the learning goals and objectives.C. To show you and the learners where theinstruction is going and the steps to get there.D. Because design tools are cool to use.
  • 8. B. To help meet the learning goals and objectives.C. To show you and the learners where theinstruction is going and the steps to get there. Did you choose B & C? The 4Cs MAP will do the above.
  • 9. Use short opening activities that: * connect learners to what they already know (or think they know) about the topic. * connect learners to each other in meaningful ways. * connect learners to what they want to learn (their own learning goals).
  • 10. TABLE TALK: Learners participate in a short table group discussion about what they want to learn from the class.DATA HUNT: Learners gather previously-learned data from other table groupmembers and share this data with theirown table groups.
  • 11. THINK AND WRITE: Learnerswrite their own personallearning goals, then share whatthey wrote with their tablegroup. STANDING SURVEY: Learners ask other table group members what they hope to be able to do with what they learn in the class. They summarize this information when back with their own group.
  • 12. Tools for Your 4Cs Toolbox
  • 13. Put the welcome, introductions, announcements,learning objectives, and anything else AFTER the connection activity..
  • 14. Which statements ARE examples of effective C1 activities (tools) that connect learners to the topic and to each other? Choose your responses, then click to the next slide for the answers.1. In pairs or triads, learners do a one-minute discussion aboutwhat they already know about the topic.2. Each learner stands and introduces himself or herselfto the class.3. In table groups, learners discuss which of the course learningobjectives are most important to them and why.4. The instructor introduces herself to the groupwith a personal story.
  • 15. 1. In pairs or triads, learners do a one-minute discussion aboutwhat they already know about the topic.3. In table groups, learners discuss which of the course learningobjectives are most important to them and why. Yes, #1 and #3 are effective C1 tools..
  • 16. Post your 2 sticky notes on C1 of your map.
  • 17. MIND MAP TopicGoogle “graphicorganizers” for freeexamples andtemplates.
  • 18. STANDING QUIZ: Learnersstand, pair up, and ask each othera content-related question. Ifthey each answer correctly, theysit back down. ONE-SENTENCE SUMMARIES: Learners write and then share one-sentence summaries of the main ideas presented so far.
  • 19. PAIR SHARE: Learners formpairs or triads and share whatthey feel are the mostimportant facts they havelearned so far. PASS THE QUESTION: Each learner writes a content-related question on an index card and then passes the card to another table member who writes the answer for a group discussion later.
  • 20. Tools for Your 4Cs Toolbox
  • 21. Insert 1-minutereview activities BETWEEN each content segment.
  • 22. You decide if the statement below is a myth or a fact. Then click to the next slide to check your answer.1. If you have a lot of information to cover, lecturing for a full fiftyminutes and then taking a ten minute break is an effectivemethod of instruction.
  • 23. 1. If you have a lot of information to cover, lecturing for a full fiftyminutes and then taking a ten minute break is an effectivemethod of instruction.MYTH. You may be able to cover all the material, but this is theleast effective method of instruction as far as learner retention ofcontent is concerned. Learners need time to think about, writeabout, and discuss the information being learned as they learn it.
  • 24. You decide if the statement below is a myth or a fact. Then click to the next slide to check your answer.2. It’s wise to divide your content into smaller segments andengage learners in short, quick review activities betweensegments because they will remember more of the content thisway.
  • 25. 2. It’s wise to divide your content into smaller segments andengage learners in short, quick review activities betweensegments because they will remember more of the content thisway.FACT. Research from cognitive neuroscience proves that thehuman brain learns better and can retain information longerwhen learning is interspersed with short periods of active review.
  • 26. You decide if the statement below is a myth or a fact. Then click to the next slide to check your answer.3. When learners take notes while listening to a lecture, they willremember more of the material, especially if the instructorpauses to allow time for learner reflection and writing.
  • 27. 3. When learners take notes while listening to a lecture, they willremember more of the material, especially if the instructorpauses to allow time for learner reflection and writing.FACT. More of the brain is engaged when learners have time tothink about and write about what they have heard.
  • 28. Post your 2 sticky notes on C2 of your map.
  • 29. Use concrete practice activities that:* actively involve and engage ALL learners, not just a few.* are high-energy, interesting, and meaningful to learners.* reinforce the skills being learned or the information that has been taught.
  • 30. TABLE GROUP PRACTICE:Learners work together topractice a skill or play a reviewgame. They teach each other andgive each other feedback.
  • 31. TABLE GROUP PRACTICE: Learners work collaboratively to build a 3-dimensional representation of major concepts. They fill in a review worksheet andFor 3-D activities, have craft materials available discuss how to apply the content tosuch as pipe cleaners, clay, markers, popsicle their jobs.sticks, scissors, colored paper, stickers, etc.
  • 32. Tools for Your 4Cs Toolbox
  • 33. ALL learners PARTICIPATEin an active reviewof major concepts.
  • 34. What word or phrase completes each sentence? Click back to slide #41 if you’re not sure, or click to the next slide for the answers.1. The C3 activities should involve and engage _____ ___________________, not just a few.2. C3 activities are always interesting and ______________ to learners.3. Concrete practice activities __________________ the skills being learned or the information that has been taught.
  • 35. ALL1. The C3 activities should involve and engage ________ LEARNERS ___________________, not just a few. MEANINGFUL2. C3 activities are always interesting and ______________ to learners. REINFORCE3. Concrete practice activities __________________ the skills being learned or the information that has been taught.
  • 36. Post your 2 sticky notes on C3 of your map.
  • 37. Include conclusion activities in which:* learners create verbal or written summaries of what they have learned.* learners discuss or write how they plan to use what they have learned.* learners do verbal or written evaluations of what they have learned.* learners celebrate the class completion and the collaboration with other learners.
  • 38. THE WALKABOUT: In pairs or triads, learners walk around the perimeter of the room discussing the most important concepts they learned and what they plan to do with this knowledge back on the job.RAPS AND RHYMES: Table groups createshort raps, poems, or songs with motionsfor content summaries. They lead thewhole group in the recitation, singing andmoving.
  • 39. CELEBRATION TIME: Learnersstand and give specific classmembers verbal compliments fortheir contributions to thelearning. They applaud eachother and do fast and quickhandshakes or high-fives witheveryone in the room.
  • 40. Tools for Your 4Cs Toolbox
  • 41. Put the celebration activity LAST so everyone leaves feeling positive about thelearning experience.
  • 42. C4 Conclusions should include which four pieces? Choose one of the three lists, then click to the next slide.1. Introductions, learning goals, agenda, housekeeping2. Summaries, evaluations, action plans, celebration3. One-minute reviews, graphic organizers, skills practice, review games
  • 43. 2. Summaries, evaluations, action plans, celebration Yes, #2 is the correct list for C4 Conclusions.
  • 44. Post your 2 sticky notes on C4 of your map.
  • 45. YOU will need to figure outhow much time to allow foreach step of your 4Cs MAP.The steps can be as long oras short as necessary.
  • 46. 4Cs MAPExamples
  • 47. C1 C2C3 C4
  • 48. 1. Create a 4Cs MAP for your next class or training. 2. Use one or more of the activities (tools) in each of the 4 steps of the map.3. Explore the resources at the end of thismicro-course to gather more tools foryour 4Cs toolbox.
  • 49. Other slide presentations by Sharon:Teaching Adults ANYTHING in 4 Easy Steps” “How to Design Great Training: Begin with the End in Mind”
  • 50. The content for this micro-course is from: www.amazon.com for book purchaseswww.Bowperson.com for free book excerpts
  • 51. www.amazon.com for book purchaseswww.Bowperson.com for free book excerpts
  • 52. SharonBowmanwww.Bowperson.com