Stay in Step Follow Up Lesson Plan

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Follow up lesson plan for Stay in Step FMS assessment recommendations.

Follow up lesson plan for Stay in Step FMS assessment recommendations.

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  • 1. Learning  Area:  Physical  Education   Year  Level:  Pre-­‐Primary  Topic:  Stay  in  Step  Follow-­‐up  Lesson   Time:  10:00-­‐10:30am  Learning  Objectives:    On  completing  this  lesson  each  student  should  be  able  to:  Verbally  state  the  key  components  of  bouncing  and  catching  a  volleyball.  Practise  the  Bounce  and  Catch  skill  correctly,  paying  attention  to  the  key  components.    How  will  I  know  the  children  have  achieved  the  lesson  objective?  What  will  I  accept  as  evidence  of  learning?  (Assessment)  Observation  of  the  correct  method  during  practise/games,  and  the  correct  answers  to  questions.  Improvement  in  the  number  of  bounces  in  20s.    Student’s  Prior  Knowledge  (what  do  the  children  already  know  about  this  topic/idea/issue):  The  student  was  introduced  to  this  skill  in  the  previous  lesson,  so  should  be  cognitively  aware  of  the  skill  sequence  and  requirements.    Preparation  (teaching  aids,  worksheets,  manipulatives,  books,  paper,  play  dough,  cards,  etc):  Duck  whistle,  stopwatch,  volleyball,  hoop,  plastic  circle  (frying  pan),  alphabet  mats.  Procedure  (the  order  in  which  things  will  be  taught):  Lesson  plan  structure  should  include  an  introduction,  body  and  closing  activity.  Focus  questions  should  also  be  included  in  the  “What  to  teach  and  how  I  will  engage  children  in  the  learning”  section.  Lesson  Plan   What  to  teach  and  how  you  will  engage  children  in  the  learning   Time  Structure   allocation  Introduction     Greet  the  student.   5  mins  (Including  how  you  gain   Tell  them  we’re  going  warm  up  our  bodies  by  singing  “Dingle  Dangle  Scarecrow”.  children’s  attention  at  the  start  of  the  lesson)   Explain  the  warm  up  game:  Mirrors.     Tell  her  she  has  to  mirror  whatever  I  do.   Move  around  an  area  using:  walk,  hops  (both  feet),  skips,  jumps,  crawls  (i.e.  run   through  the  sequence  in  between  balances).   When  the  duck  whistle  blows,  the  child  has  to  copy  a  balance  (run  through  the   sequence  between  FMS  locomotor  skills):  tall  stretch,  sideways  bend,  triangle,  tree,   tree  with  broken  branch,  knotted  tree,  dancer,  airplane.     Emphasise  slightly  bending  the  knee  of  the  supporting  leg,  and  focusing  on  a  fixed  spot   to  assist  the  balances.    If  right  side  balance  is  easy,  ask  her  to  try  closing  her  eyes,  or   going  up  on  her  tiptoes.   In  dancer,  focus  on  placing  the  fingertips  on  the  ground  and  using  them  to  push  the   body  upward,  to  raise  awareness  of  the  fingertips  in  preparation  for  using  the  fingertips   catching  the  ball.     Transition:  Hop  on  your  right  leg  to  go  and  get  a  drink.    Hop  back  on  your  left  leg.  
  • 2. Body  of  the   Tell  the  child  we  are  going  to  work  on  bouncing  and  catching  the  ball.    lesson   High  Ball  Throw   3  mins     1. Demonstrate  throwing  the  ball  high  into  the  air,  watching  it,  letting  it  bounce       and  catching  it.    Mention  key  components  of  catching:       -­‐ Eyes  on  the  ball     -­‐ Hands  reach  out  to  meet  the  ball     -­‐ Close  hands  and  fingers  on  the  ball     -­‐ Bend  elbows  to  absorb  impact     2. Ask  the  child  to  have  a  turn.     3. Observe  and  give  positive/corrective  feedback  where  necessary.     Popcorn  Bounces     1. Demonstrate  throwing  the  popcorn  into  the  pot  (plastic  circle)  with  your  finger     tips,  and  letting  it  bounce  up  from  a  sitting  position  (i.e.  sitting  on  heels).     Remind  the  child  to  watch  the  popcorn  in  case  it  pops  out  of  the  pan.   7  mins   2. Allow  child  to  practice,  giving  appropriate  feedback.     3. Say  you  are  turning  up  the  heat  in  the  pan  and  the  popcorn  is  going  to  jump     higher.    Ask  the  child  to  move  to  a  kneeling  position  and  repeat  the  exercise.       Encourage  them  to  push  harder  if  necessary.     4. Say  you  are  turning  up  the  heat  again,  and  ask  the  child  to  stand,  letting  the   popcorn  pop  up  to  their  belly  button.    Remind  them  of  main  parts  of  bounce:     -­‐ bend  knees     -­‐ lean  forward  slightly     -­‐ spread  fingertips  to  control  ball     5. Say  you  are  turning  up  the  heat  even  more,  and  that  it  makes  the  popcorn  pop     even  faster.    Ask  the  child  to  see  how  fast  they  can  pop  their  popcorn  without     letting  it  get  out  of  the  pan.     6. Congratulate  the  child  on  her  efforts  and  any  progress  made.     Transition:  Repeat  hop  to  water  bottle  station,  returning  on  opposite  foot.     Bounce,  Catch,  Through  the  Hoop.     1. Stand  about  2m  apart  facing  each  other,  with  the  hoop  in  between  you  and  the   5  mins   child.    Vary  the  distance  according  to  the  child’s  throwing  ability.     2. Throw  the  volleyball  into  the  centre  of  the  hoop,  let  it  bounce  and  ask  the  child     to  catch  it.     3. When  10  throws/catches  (i.e.  5  catches  each)  have  been  completed,  the  person     who  is  not  holding  the  ball  holds  the  hoop  up  to  the  side,  and  the  other  person     gets  a  chance  to  throw  the  ball  through  the  hoop.    A  point  is  scored  if  the  ball     goes  through  the  hoop,  the  ball  is  swapped  to  the  other  person  and  the   bounce/catch  continues  until  another  chance  to  shoot  is  earned.         4. The  first  person  to  reach  5  points  wins  the  game.        
  • 3.     Alphabet  Bounces     1. Set  the  alphabet  mats  out  in  a  rectangle  (3x5)  using  the  letters  A,  C,  E,  F,  H,  I,  J,   5  mins   N,  M,  O,  P,  R,  S,  T,  U.   2. Tell  the  child  you  are  going  to  call  out  a  letter,  and  they  need  to  find  the  letter   and  bounce  the  ball  on  each  tile  till  they  get  to  it.   3. Ask  them  to  sound  the  letters  out  to  see  what  they  say.  e.g.“I  can..  (hop),   (jump),  (skip)!”,  “I  am  a  star!”,  “I  am  fit!”  other  simple  words  like  ‘fun’,  their   name  etc.   4. Variation:  The  child  could  practise  hopping  from  one  letter  to  the  next.     Encourage  them  to  skip  letters  so  that  their  hopping  distance  is  gradually   increased.      Closing  Activity  (How  do  you  let  children   Ask  the  child  to  tell  you  the  important  things  to  remember  when  bouncing  and  catching   5  mins  know  the  lesson  has  finished?)   the  ball.     Ask  the  child  to  guess  how  many  popcorns  they  can  pop  in  20s,  and  count  the  bounces   out  loud.   If  it  is  better  than  last  week,  tell  them,  saying  that  they  improved  because  they  did  such   good  practise.    Tell  them  they  can  keep  practicing  whenever  they  want  and  they  will   keep  getting  better  at  it.   Ask  the  child  which  part  of  the  lesson  they  liked  the  best,  and  thank  them  for   participating.    
  • 4. Reflection  on  Action  The  warm-­‐up  was  very  effective  in  focusing  Cate  and  she  enjoyed  the  variety  of  movements.  The  main  focus  of  the  follow  up  lesson  was  the  Volleyball  Bounce  and  Catch  skill.    The  initial  activity  of  a  high  ball  throw  and  catch  (after  the  bounce)  proved  to  be  too  difficult,  and  I  substituted  a  ball  rolling  activity  to  assist  Cate  in  visually  tracking  the  ball,  and  improve  her  hand-­‐eye  co-­‐ordination.    This  was  effective  and  enabled  her  to  move  on  to  the  popcorn  bounces  with  a  reasonable  degree  of  success.  During  the  popcorn  bounces  I  constantly  reminded  her  of  the  key  criteria  and  provided  specific  feedback,  and  also  encouraged  her  to  monitor  her  own  actions  by  asking  questions.    This  was  also  effective  in  making  her  realise  how  important  the  key  criteria  were.  She  enjoyed  the  practise,  and  wanted  to  continue  trying  to  see  how  many  bounces  she  could  do.    She  had  several  attempts,  achieving  scores  of  9,  11,  12,  15  and  11.    These  were  all  improvements  on  the  score  of  8  in  the  previous  lesson,  and  there  was  a  marked  improvement  in  her  technique.  If  I  had  the  chance  to  do  the  lesson  again  I  would  begin  with  a  less  difficult,  closed  skill,  and  gradually  increase  the  level  of  difficulty.