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Oy3 g opm_200_ac_operations_v7.0
Oy3 g opm_200_ac_operations_v7.0
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Oy3 g opm_200_ac_operations_v7.0

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  • 1. Oyster 3G AC Operations ManualOY3G_OPM_200 7.0 ip.access Ltd Building 2020 Cambourne Business Park Cambourne Cambridgeshire CB23 6DW United Kingdom www.ipaccess.com
  • 2. Revision HistoryVersion Change Summary Date Author1.0 Released for IPA0.6.0 04 Aug 2009 AM42.0 Released for IPA0.6.1 30 Sep 2009 AM43.0 Re-released for IPA0.6.1 19 Oct 2009 AM44.0 Re-released for IPA0.6.1 30 Nov 2009 AM45.0 Re-released for IPA0.6.1, with minor changes from approval comments 02 Feb 2010 AM45.1 First update for IPA1.0, move config info, including XML file reference, to 04 Mar 2010 AM4 separate configuration manual (OY3G_OPM_220)5.2 Updated with review feedback, added application descriptions and some 25 May 2010 AM4 command reference5.3 Added logging information 14 Jul 2010 AM45.4 Additions to applications details, updated hardware replacement procedures 29 Jul 2010 AM45.5 Updated from review feedback 16 Sep 2010 AM45.6 Updated from comments in approval phase 04 Oct 2010 AM45.7 Information on avoiding hpi commands when applications are running 06 Oct 2010 AM46.0 Released for IPA1.0, revision history consolidated 13 Oct 2010 AM46.1 Updated hc command reference for latest IPA1.0, reference to log getter 11 Nov 2010 AM46.2 Remove most h/w replacement and reference new manuals, warnings about 18 Nov 2010 AM4 app-reset, warnings not to do in-service commissioning, additional supporting info on AC operations6.3 Minor changes from review feedback 10 Jan 2010 AM46.4 Some editorial changes 13 Jan 2011 AM47.0 Re-released for IPA1.0 21 Jan 2011 AM4 The information contained in this document is commercially confidential and must not be disclosed to third parties without prior consent.
  • 3. Table of Contents 1 Introduction............................................................................................ 1 1.1 Related Information............................................................................................ 1 1.1.1 Supporting Manuals ............................................................................................. 1 1.1.2 References ........................................................................................................... 1 1.2 Terminology ....................................................................................................... 1 2 Oyster 3G AC Hardware Overview ....................................................... 2 2.1 Oyster 3G AC Hardware Layout ........................................................................ 2 2.2 12U Oyster 3G AC Chassis ............................................................................... 3 2.2.1 Chassis Front ....................................................................................................... 4 2.2.2 Air Mover Modules (AMMs).................................................................................. 6 2.2.3 Air Filter ................................................................................................................ 7 2.2.4 Chassis Back........................................................................................................ 8 2.2.5 Power Entry Modules (PEMs) .............................................................................. 9 2.3 ATCA-2210 SCM ............................................................................................. 11 2.3.1 ATCA-2210 Front Panel ..................................................................................... 12 2.4 ATCA-5010 SPM (RTM for ATCA-2210 SCM) ................................................ 14 2.4.1 ATCA-5010 Front Panel ..................................................................................... 15 2.5 ATCA-4300 SBC Card ..................................................................................... 17 2.5.1 ATCA-4300 Front Panel ..................................................................................... 18 2.6 73GB Hard Disk AMC-3202............................................................................. 21 2.6.1 Hard Disk Partitioning......................................................................................... 21 2.6.2 AMC-3202 Front Panel....................................................................................... 22 2.7 ATCA-1200 Carrier Card ................................................................................. 23 2.7.1 ATCA-1200 Front Panel ..................................................................................... 24 2.8 iSPAN 3650 AMC for ATM............................................................................... 27 2.8.1 iSPAN 3650 Front Panel .................................................................................... 27 2.8.2 Optical (OC3) SFP ............................................................................................. 28 2.9 Quad Gigabit Ethernet AMC-7211 for Iu+........................................................ 29 2.9.1 AMC-7211 Front Panel....................................................................................... 29 2.9.2 Ethernet SFP...................................................................................................... 30 2.10 Oyster 3G AC Hardware Redundancy Summary ............................................ 31 2.10.1 SBC Redundancy............................................................................................... 31 2.10.2 SCM and SPM Redundancy .............................................................................. 31 2.10.3 Carrier Card Redundancy and Iu and Iu+ Interface Card Redundancy ............. 32 2.10.4 PEM Redundancy .............................................................................................. 33 2.10.5 AMM Redundancy.............................................................................................. 33 3 Oyster 3G AC Operating Basics......................................................... 34 3.1 Oyster 3G AC Startup ...................................................................................... 34 3.1.1 SCMs.................................................................................................................. 34 3.1.2 Management Cards............................................................................................ 34 3.1.3 Stacks Cards and Call Control Cards................................................................. 36Oyster 3G AC Operations Manual ContentsOY3G_OPM_200 v7.0 for IPA1.0 © ip.access Limited 2011 Page i
  • 4. 3.1.4 Carrier Cards and AMCs .................................................................................... 36 3.2 AC Interfaces ................................................................................................... 36 3.3 User Accounts on an AC.................................................................................. 38 3.4 Internal AC IP Addresses................................................................................. 38 3.4.1 Main Card IP Addresses .................................................................................... 38 3.4.2 AMC Bay IP Addresses...................................................................................... 39 3.5 General Tips for Working with ACs.................................................................. 40 3.5.1 Mandated Changes Only.................................................................................... 40 3.5.2 AC Memory Usage - No Swap Space ................................................................ 40 3.5.3 Using the AC CLI (debug.sh) ............................................................................. 40 3.5.4 Communicate when Changing the State of an AC............................................. 40 3.6 AC Stop and Start Procedures......................................................................... 41 3.6.1 Determine the Primary Management Card......................................................... 41 3.6.2 Power Down an Oyster 3G AC........................................................................... 42 3.6.3 Command Line Shut Down ................................................................................ 42 3.6.4 Shut Down with the Hot Swap Latch .................................................................. 43 3.6.5 Power Up an Oyster 3G AC ............................................................................... 44 3.6.6 Soft Restarts....................................................................................................... 44 3.7 AC Message Logging....................................................................................... 46 3.7.1 Log File Retention .............................................................................................. 47 3.7.2 Taking Log Files Offline for Analysis .................................................................. 47 3.7.3 Log File Analysis ................................................................................................ 47 4 Oyster 3G AC Applications................................................................. 49 4.1 AC Application Architecture Basics.................................................................. 49 4.1.1 Linux................................................................................................................... 49 4.1.2 Middleware ......................................................................................................... 49 4.1.3 AC Applications .................................................................................................. 50 4.2 AC Application Distribution .............................................................................. 50 4.3 Management Card Applications....................................................................... 51 4.3.1 MgmtModule....................................................................................................... 51 4.3.2 FaultManager ..................................................................................................... 51 4.3.3 AC_DB ............................................................................................................... 51 4.3.4 MgmtProxyIAP ................................................................................................... 52 4.3.5 PlatformManager................................................................................................ 52 4.3.6 IapController....................................................................................................... 52 4.3.7 APController ....................................................................................................... 52 4.3.8 MeasurementController...................................................................................... 52 4.3.9 MgmtProxyATM.................................................................................................. 52 4.3.10 OmcrClient ......................................................................................................... 52 4.4 Stacks Card Applications ................................................................................. 53 4.4.1 SAAL .................................................................................................................. 53 4.4.2 MgmtProxyStacks .............................................................................................. 53 4.4.3 RANAP ............................................................................................................... 53 4.4.4 ALCAP................................................................................................................ 53 4.4.5 Mtp3B_SCCP ..................................................................................................... 53 4.5 Call Control Card Applications ......................................................................... 53Oyster 3G AC Operations Manual ContentsOY3G_OPM_200 v7.0 for IPA1.0 © ip.access Limited 2011 Page ii
  • 5. 4.5.1 IuController......................................................................................................... 53 4.5.2 AdmissionControl ............................................................................................... 53 4.5.3 MgmtProxyControl.............................................................................................. 53 4.5.4 UECCC............................................................................................................... 54 4.5.5 TRUM ................................................................................................................. 54 4.5.6 UPProxy ............................................................................................................. 54 4.5.7 UMR ................................................................................................................... 54 4.5.8 Paging ................................................................................................................ 55 4.6 Iu+ Interface Card Applications........................................................................ 55 4.6.1 IapUserPlaneAp ................................................................................................. 55 4.6.2 IapMFAp............................................................................................................. 55 4.6.3 IapMMAp ............................................................................................................ 55 4.7 Middleware Components (OpenClovis) ........................................................... 55 4.7.1 cpm..................................................................................................................... 56 4.7.2 gmsServer .......................................................................................................... 56 4.7.3 nameServer........................................................................................................ 56 4.7.4 logServer ............................................................................................................ 56 4.7.5 ckptServer .......................................................................................................... 56 4.7.6 eventServer ........................................................................................................ 56 4.8 Elevated Availability and Automatic Application Restarts ................................ 57 4.9 Manual Startup of AC Applications .................................................................. 58 5 Oyster 3G AC Commands................................................................... 59 5.1 Management Card Commands........................................................................ 59 5.1.1 AC Configurator.................................................................................................. 59 5.1.2 Health Check...................................................................................................... 59 5.1.3 Log Getter .......................................................................................................... 66 5.1.4 AMC Hardware Configuration Commands ......................................................... 66 5.1.5 Configure the AC Host Name............................................................................. 67 5.1.6 Boot Switching.................................................................................................... 69 5.1.7 Field Mode and Lab Mode Selection.................................................................. 69 5.1.8 Power Sequence Configuration.......................................................................... 70 5.2 SCM Commands.............................................................................................. 71 5.2.1 Resource IDs for HPI Commands ...................................................................... 71 5.2.2 Powercycle with HPI........................................................................................... 71 5.2.3 Extract and Insert with HPI................................................................................. 72 6 Oyster 3G AC Management from the OMC-R.................................... 75 6.1 Oyster 3G AC Information in the OMC-R Client .............................................. 75 6.1.1 Check Key AC Attributes.................................................................................... 75 6.1.2 General Information............................................................................................ 75 6.2 AC Alarms........................................................................................................ 76 6.2.1 Finding and Managing Alarms for an AC ........................................................... 76 6.2.2 Alarm Thresholds ............................................................................................... 77 7 Backup and Restore ............................................................................ 79 7.1 AC Backup Overview ....................................................................................... 79 7.1.1 Backup Scenarios .............................................................................................. 79Oyster 3G AC Operations Manual ContentsOY3G_OPM_200 v7.0 for IPA1.0 © ip.access Limited 2011 Page iii
  • 6. 7.2 Automatic Backup ............................................................................................ 80 7.2.1 Enable the Default Automatic Backup................................................................ 80 7.2.2 Modify Automatic Backups ................................................................................. 81 7.2.3 Disable Automatic Backups................................................................................ 82 7.3 Run the Backup Utility...................................................................................... 82 7.4 Backup ............................................................................................................. 83 7.5 Command Line Backup.................................................................................... 84 7.6 Restore ............................................................................................................ 85 7.6.1 Restore From a Backup Archive ........................................................................ 85 7.7 Manage Archives ............................................................................................. 86 7.7.1 Disk Usage by Backup Archives ........................................................................ 86 7.7.2 List Archives ....................................................................................................... 86 7.7.3 Delete a Backup Archive .................................................................................... 87 7.7.4 Copy Archive to a Remote Server...................................................................... 87 7.7.5 Copy Archive From a Remote Server ................................................................ 89 8 General Maintenance........................................................................... 90 8.1 Air Filters.......................................................................................................... 90 8.1.1 Air Filter Cleaning............................................................................................... 90 8.1.2 Replacement Air Filters ..................................................................................... 90 9 Hardware Replacement ....................................................................... 91 9.1 Service Affecting .............................................................................................. 91 9.2 About Hot Swap ............................................................................................... 91 9.2.1 Hot Swap Limitations.......................................................................................... 91 9.3 Platform Manager and Unresponsive Components ......................................... 92 9.4 Safety and Handling Precautions..................................................................... 92 9.4.1 General Precautions........................................................................................... 92 9.4.2 Hardware Module Handling Precautions............................................................ 93 9.4.3 Laser Safety ....................................................................................................... 93 9.5 Detailed Replacement Procedures .................................................................. 93 9.5.1 Manuals with Procedures to Pre-Prepare Replacement Components............... 93 9.5.2 Manuals with Maintenance Window Only Procedures ....................................... 95 9.5.3 Other Replacement Procedures......................................................................... 96 10 Miscellaneous Hardware Replacement Procedures......................... 97 10.1 Component Replacement Requirements......................................................... 97 10.2 Replace the Air Filter ....................................................................................... 97 10.2.1 Remove the Filter ............................................................................................... 97 10.2.2 Install the Replacement Filter............................................................................. 98 10.3 Replace an AMM ............................................................................................. 98 10.3.1 Remotely Hot Swap and Identify the Faulty AMM.............................................. 98 10.3.2 Remove an AMM.............................................................................................. 100 10.3.3 Install a Replacement AMM ............................................................................. 101 10.3.4 Activate the AMM ............................................................................................. 102 10.3.5 Take the AMM Out of Hot Swap....................................................................... 102Oyster 3G AC Operations ManualOY3G_OPM_200 v7.0 for IPA1.0 © ip.access Limited 2011 Page iv
  • 7. 10.3.6 Close the Front Panel....................................................................................... 103 10.4 Replace a PEM .............................................................................................. 103 10.4.1 Hot Swap the PEM ........................................................................................... 104 10.4.2 Remove a PEM ................................................................................................ 105 10.4.3 Install the Replacement PEM ........................................................................... 105 10.4.4 Take the PEM Out of Hot Swap ....................................................................... 106 11 CLI Reference..................................................................................... 108 11.1 Access Controller CLI .................................................................................... 109 11.1.1 Start the CLI ..................................................................................................... 109 11.1.2 Navigate the CLI............................................................................................... 109 11.1.3 Exit the CLI....................................................................................................... 111 11.1.4 Component Command Summary..................................................................... 112 11.1.5 Management Card............................................................................................ 113 11.1.6 Stacks Card...................................................................................................... 116 11.1.7 Call Control Card.............................................................................................. 118 11.1.8 Management Proxy .......................................................................................... 128 11.2 iSPAN 3650 CLI............................................................................................. 129 11.2.1 Start the CLI ..................................................................................................... 129 11.2.2 Using the CLI.................................................................................................... 130 11.2.3 Exit the CLI....................................................................................................... 130 11.2.4 ATM Commands .............................................................................................. 130 11.2.5 Ethernet Commands ........................................................................................ 132Oyster 3G AC Operations ManualOY3G_OPM_200 v7.0 for IPA1.0 © ip.access Limited 2011 Page v
  • 8. 1 Introduction This manual provides operational information on the Oyster 3G AC and associated procedures. There is also information on AC maintenance and hardware replacement. This manual assumes the Oyster 3G AC has already been installed, with all the required hardware components, as described in [INST_200].1.1 Related Information1.1.1 Supporting Manuals Additional topics on managing and/or configuring an AC are covered by other manuals as follows: • General AC configuration - see [OPM_220] • Using AC Configurator to edit the XML configuration files - see [OPM_205] • AC troubleshooting information - see [TRB_200] • Alarm management in the OMC-R Client - see [OPM_410]1.1.2 References The following references appear in this manual: [GST_200] Oyster 3G AC Product Description (OY3G_GST_200) [INST_200] Oyster 3G AC Installation Manual (OY3G_INST_200) [INST_210] Oyster 3G AC Core Network Integration Manual (OY3G_INST_210) [OPM_205] Oyster 3G AC Configurator Manual (OY3G_OPM_205) [OPM_220] Oyster 3G AC Configuration Manual (OY3G_OPM_220) [OPM_410] 3G OMC-R Client Operations Manual (OY3G_OPM_410) [REF_105] Oyster 3G System Glossary (OY3G_REF_105) [REF_130] Oyster 3G MIB Fault Management (FM) Reference Manual (OY3G_REF_120) [TRB_200] Oyster 3G AC Troubleshooting Manual (OY3G_TRB_200) [21.905] Vocabulary for 3GPP Specifications (3GPP 3G TR 21.905)1.2 Terminology For common Oyster 3G System terminology see [REF_105]. For common 3GPP terminology see [21.905].Oyster 3G AC Operations Manual IntroductionOY3G_OPM_200 v7.0 for IPA1.0 © ip.access Limited 2011 Page 1
  • 9. 2 Oyster 3G AC Hardware Overview This section provides information about the Oyster 3G AC hardware, with descriptions of the individual cards. Important details about each hardware component are provided, such as which external ports are used for connections, LED locations and LED states. This section assumes the Oyster 3G AC has already been installed, with all the required hardware components, as described in [INST_200]. Note: The information in this section is provided for information only. Instructions for working with the AC are provided in other sections. Also, for general safety and handling precautions, see section 9.4. For additional safety details and also for regulatory information, see [GST_200].2.1 Oyster 3G AC Hardware Layout The following diagram shows the maximum Oyster 3G AC hardware layout in the IPA1.0 system release: Management Stacks Call Control Carrier Card Card Card SCM Card ATCA-4300 ATCA-4300 ATCA-4300 ATCA-2210 ATCA-1200 4 x iSPAN 3650 AMC (ATM) 2 x AMC-7211 (Ethernet) HDD AMC-3202 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 The main hardware components installed in the AC chassis are: • 2 x Management Card (ATCA-4300 with AMC-3202 Hard Disk) • 2 x Stacks Card (ATCA-4300) • 2 x Call Control Card (ATCA-4300) • 2 x SCM (ATCA-2210) • 2 x SCM RTM (ATCA-5010 SPM - fitted to rear of chassis, not shown above)Oyster 3G AC Operations Manual Oyster 3G AC Hardware OverviewOY3G_OPM_200 v7.0 for IPA1.0 © ip.access Limited 2011 Page 2
  • 10. • 2 x Carrier Card (ATCA-1200) • 2 x Quad Gigabit AMC-7211 (installed in the Carrier Cards) • 4 x iSPAN 3650 ATM AMC (installed in the Carrier Cards) Note: The minimum configuration, for very reduced traffic models, is two Carrier Cards with a single iSPAN 3650 each. Each Carrier Card will still have one AMC-7211 each to provide hardware redundancy.2.2 12U Oyster 3G AC Chassis The 12U ATCA-6000 chassis is supplied with pre-installed hardware to provide power, cooling, air filtration and platform management. Hence, the pre-installed components are as follows: • AMMs (Air Mover Modules, i.e. fans) • Air Filter • PEMs (Power Entry Modules) • 2 x ATCA-2210 SCM cards with ATCA-5010 RTMs (in slots 7 and 8) • Air management panels for empty slotsOyster 3G AC Operations Manual Oyster 3G AC Hardware OverviewOY3G_OPM_200 v7.0 for IPA1.0 © ip.access Limited 2011 Page 3
  • 11. 2.2.1 Chassis Front Hinged Front Panel The front panel is hinged on its lower edge to provide access to the AMMs (fans). The AMMs are described in section 2.2.2. The panel is opened using the latches at each end of the panel: The LCD panel can show status information about the AC chassis. Do not use the messages on this panel to diagnose the health of the AC. Use the OMC-R Client instead.Oyster 3G AC Operations Manual Oyster 3G AC Hardware OverviewOY3G_OPM_200 v7.0 for IPA1.0 © ip.access Limited 2011 Page 4
  • 12. The front panel LEDs have the following functions: Label Function Colour Usage Critical Critical alarm Red On to indicate a critical alarm condition, or off condition if there is no critical alarm condition. Major Major alarm Amber or red On to indicate a major alarm condition, or off if condition there is no major alarm condition. Minor Minor alarm Amber On to indicate a minor alarm condition, or off if condition there is no minor alarm condition. Power Adequate power Green This is on for normal operation, when the AC indication has adequate power. If this is off when the AC is running, this indicates the AC does not have adequate power. When there is a chassis alarm condition, the relevant alarm LED will illuminate and the audible alarm will beep. Press the ALARM ACK button to acknowledge any current alarms and the audible alarm will stop beeping. Note: As a general rule, an AC will be managed remotely. If an alarm is raised directly by the chassis that is service affecting, it is likely that there will be alarm indication in the OMC-R or a change in service status of the AC. ATCA Slots • There are 14 vertical slots for ATCA cards. • A standard AC has cards in the first ten slots. • Slots 7 and 8 in the centre are the two hub slots. The hub slots are reserved for SCMs. • Any empty slots must have non-functional airflow management panels installed. These panels block air flow through empty slots, so that only occupied slots are cooled. They also ensure that dust does not enter the AC. Air Intake The air intake must not be obscured or blocked. The air filter is accessed via the air intake. The air filter is described in section 2.2.3.Oyster 3G AC Operations Manual Oyster 3G AC Hardware OverviewOY3G_OPM_200 v7.0 for IPA1.0 © ip.access Limited 2011 Page 5
  • 13. 2.2.2 Air Mover Modules (AMMs) The AC has four hot swappable AMMs that draw air through the chassis. These fans provide a high rate of air flow, which is variable to ensure the AC maintains a suitable operating temperature. The AMMs are accessed via the hinged front panel on the front of the AC. AMM Front Panel Hot Swap LED OOS LED Handle Attachment Points Finger Holes Hot Swap Toggle Switch Hot Swap Toggle Switch Use the hot swap toggle switch to switch an AMM between the operational and hot swap states. The switch is set to the left, in the closed position, for normal operation. Move the switch to the right, to the open position, to put the AMM into the hot swap state prior to removal from the chassis (the impeller must be allowed to stop before extraction - this can take up to 5 minutes). Unlike the hot swap latches or handles on other hardware components, the state of this switch does not lock or unlock the AMM from the chassis. LEDs The AMM LEDs are used as follows by an Oyster 3G AC: Label Function Colour Usage H/S Hot Swap Blue See section 9.2 for details about hot swap operation. OOS Out of Service Red Not used.Oyster 3G AC Operations Manual Oyster 3G AC Hardware OverviewOY3G_OPM_200 v7.0 for IPA1.0 © ip.access Limited 2011 Page 6
  • 14. Handle Attachment Points The handle attachment points are used to attach the AMM extraction handle, which must be used for the AMMs in the lower AMM slots. Only three of the screw holes are used to attach the handle, as the handle is designed to rotate slightly to allow the handle to lock the AMM into the chassis. This is not needed for the upper AMMs as they are locked in place when the front panel is closed. Finger Holes The finger holes are used for AMM extraction from the upper AMM slots in the chassis.2.2.3 Air Filter AMMs (Fans) Air Out Chassis Chassis Front Back Air In Filter The air filter is behind the air intake at the front of the chassis. The filter consists of a metal frame containing a polyurethane foam filter.Oyster 3G AC Operations Manual Oyster 3G AC Hardware OverviewOY3G_OPM_200 v7.0 for IPA1.0 © ip.access Limited 2011 Page 7
  • 15. 2.2.4 Chassis Back Air Vent The air vent is covered in a wire mesh to prevent contact with the high speed impellers in the AMMs. The AMMs are described in section 2.2.2. RTM Slots • There are 14 vertical slots for RTM (Rear Transmission Module) cards. • A standard AC only has cards in the two hub slots in the centre, slots 7 and 8. These are occupied by the SCM RTMs, which are ATCA-5010 SPM cards. • The empty slots must have non-functional airflow management panels installed. These panels block air flow through empty slots, so that only occupied slots are cooled. They also ensure that dust does not enter the AC. Frame Ground Connection Studs To ensure high reliability, a frame-ground cable must connect the frame ground to an external high-quality ground connection. The three studs permit the use of two-hole lugs (for anti-rotation) grounding connection to the platform frame.Oyster 3G AC Operations Manual Oyster 3G AC Hardware OverviewOY3G_OPM_200 v7.0 for IPA1.0 © ip.access Limited 2011 Page 8
  • 16. 2.2.5 Power Entry Modules (PEMs) Protective Cover Attachment Screws -(POWER) Operating Voltage -40.5VDC to -72VDC Maximum Current 90A Torque nuts to 7.12Nm (63 lbf.in) Max. +(RETURN) OFF ON Closed Open Reverse Present Power Power OOS H/S Handle Power Switch Power Connectors LEDs Hot Swap (Circuit Breaker) Switch There are two field-replaceable PEMs installed in the AC chassis, which condition the electrical power supplied to the AC. Each PEM is capable of supplying full power to the chassis. Hence, having two PEMs provides hardware redundancy for the power input. The PEMs have inrush current control, so that inrush current is limited to a safe level to help with uninterrupted AC operation. This also extends to PEM hot swap, so that a PEM can be replaced without causing power fluctuations. The PEMs have input voltage protection, which protects the AC from voltages outside the range of -75V to -36V. The PEM will not operate with out of range voltages, to prevent damage to the AC hardware. Protective Cover Attachment Screws To prevent contact with the power connectors, the PEM is supplied with a protective plastic cover. This must not be removed while live power is supplied to the power connectors. Power Switch/Circuit Breaker This is a 90A circuit breaker that stops the PEM supplying power to the chassis, and will trip to prevent electrical damage to the AC hardware. This will also trip if, for example, the power leads are reversed. Power Connectors These are dual M6 insulated studs. The PEM is designed to operate from –36 V to –75 V and can withstand 100-V transients for at least 100ms, 200-V transients for at least 5µs, and 1500-V fast transients.Oyster 3G AC Operations Manual Oyster 3G AC Hardware OverviewOY3G_OPM_200 v7.0 for IPA1.0 © ip.access Limited 2011 Page 9
  • 17. LEDs The PEM LEDs are used as follows by an Oyster 3G AC: Label Function Colour Usage H/S Hot Swap Blue See section 9.2 for details about hot swap operation. OOS Out of Service Red Not used. Power Power Green On for normal operation. Off for no power or Present input voltage is out of range. Reverse Reverse Power Red Power Hot Swap Switch The hot swap switch toggles the PEM in and out of the hot swap state.Oyster 3G AC Operations Manual Oyster 3G AC Hardware OverviewOY3G_OPM_200 v7.0 for IPA1.0 © ip.access Limited 2011 Page 10
  • 18. 2.3 ATCA-2210 SCM Two SCM (Switch and Control Module) cards are pre-installed in slots 7 and 8 of the AC chassis. These each have an ATCA-5010 RTM (Rear Transmission Module), fitted to the corresponding slots in the rear of the chassis. Note: The SCMs are the only cards in the Oyster 3G AC that also have RTMs. The main functions provided by the SCMs are: • Backplane network switching • IPMIOyster 3G AC Operations Manual Oyster 3G AC Hardware OverviewOY3G_OPM_200 v7.0 for IPA1.0 © ip.access Limited 2011 Page 11
  • 19. 2.3.1 ATCA-2210 Front Panel Thumbscrew ATCA - 2210 COM-E USB COM Express USB Port Ejector Latch COM-E COM Express Serial Port SER LMP Serial Port SER LMP Out Of Service LED OOS COM-E Power LED ETH COM Express Ethernet Port PWR Active LED LMP Ethernet Port LMP ETH ACT LINK XFP 1/1 PORT LINK XFP 1/2 PORT LINK Fabric Ports XFP 1/3 PORT LINK XFP 1/4 PORT FABRIC BASE LINK XFP 1/5 PORT Base Ports LINK PORT SFP 1/6 LINK SFP 1/7 Hot Swap LED PORT H/S LINK PORT SFP 1/8 LINK SFP 1/9 PORT Hot Swap Ejector Latch Reset Button RESET Thumbscrew Thumbscrews The thumbscrews secure the ATCA-2210 card in the chassis. They must be finger tight to ensure an ATCA-2210 cannot be ejected by accident, such as when it becomes necessary to put a card in the hot swap state with the hot swap ejector latch. The thumbscrews must not be over tightened. Ports The LMP Serial Port provides console access to an ATCA-2210. This is used during AC installation for initial commissioning of each SCM. Once installation is complete, permanent terminals connected to the serial port for each SCM are recommended for support purposes. Typically this is achieved with a terminal server. The LMP Ethernet port is also used at installation time, for copying configuration files onto the SCM. This may also be used occasionally in some troubleshooting scenarios, but it is not permanently connected to anything.Oyster 3G AC Operations Manual Oyster 3G AC Hardware OverviewOY3G_OPM_200 v7.0 for IPA1.0 © ip.access Limited 2011 Page 12
  • 20. The remaining ports are not used. That is, the COM Express USB, SER and ETH, Fabric and Base XFPs and Base SFPs. LEDs The SCM LEDs are used as follows by an Oyster 3G AC: Label Function Colour Usage OOS Out of Service Amber or red Not used. PWR Power Green Steady green for normal operation ACT Active Amber Steady amber for the Active SCM, flashing occasionally for the Standby SCM H/S Hot Swap Blue See section 9.2 for details about hot swap operation. Reset Button Using the reset button is service affecting and using it is unsupported in an Oyster 3G AC. Therefore, do not press the reset button. SCM Ejector Latches Hot Swap Ejector Latch Inner Latch - push in fully to unlock Each ATCA-2210 has two ejector latches. Both latches have a push-lock mechanism, using an inner latch that must be pushed in all the way to release the lock. In particular, this prevents accidental hot swap with the lower latch. Only use the upper latch when inserting the card in a slot or removing it from its slot. Do not use the upper latch when the thumbscrews have been tightened. The lower latch can be opened slightly even when the thumbscrews are tightened. Opening the lower latch even slightly will activate hot swap. To open a lower latch, push in the inner latch to release the lock and then open the latch slightly. If the card is not already in the hot swap state, the hot swap LED will start flashing and a shut down command will be sent to the operating system. The LED will turn steady blue once the card has shut down. To close the lower latch, simply push the latch home. The latch will lock in place and, assuming power is applied to chassis, the card will start up. See section 9.2 for details about hot swap operation.Oyster 3G AC Operations Manual Oyster 3G AC Hardware OverviewOY3G_OPM_200 v7.0 for IPA1.0 © ip.access Limited 2011 Page 13
  • 21. 2.4 ATCA-5010 SPM (RTM for ATCA-2210 SCM) Two SPM (Shelf Peripheral Module) cards are pre-installed in the AC chassis. These are the RTMs (Rear Transmission Module) fitted to slots 7 and 8 in the rear of the chassis. Some of the additional features provided by the SPMs are: • IPMB bus interfaces, providing communication with the modules in the chassis • Detection of proper air filter installation • Communication with air inlet and PEM temperature sensors • Control of the intelligent AMMsOyster 3G AC Operations Manual Oyster 3G AC Hardware OverviewOY3G_OPM_200 v7.0 for IPA1.0 © ip.access Limited 2011 Page 14
  • 22. 2.4.1 ATCA-5010 Front Panel Thumbscrew ATCA - 5010 T1/E1 Ejector Latch BITS 1 SSU/ BITS 2 SSU/ SSU/BITS Ports OOS BITS 3 SSU/ Out Of Service LED PWR Power LED BITS 4 SSU/ ACT Application LED LINK SFP 3/1 PORT LINK SFP 3/2 PORT Fabric I/O Ports LINK SFP 3/3 PORT LINK SFP 3/4 PORT FABRIC LINK SFP 3/5 PORT LINK SFP 3/6 PORT Base I/O Ports LINK SFP 3/7 PORT LINK SFP 3/8 PORT TELCO ALARM Telco Alarm Port Hot Swap LED H/S Hot Swap Ejector Latch Thumbscrew Thumbscrews The thumbscrews secure the ATCA-5010 card in the chassis. They must be finger tight to ensure an ATCA-5010 cannot be ejected by accident, such as when it becomes necessary to put a card in the hot swap state with the hot swap ejector latch. The thumbscrews must not be over tightened. Ports The ATCA-5010 ports are not used.Oyster 3G AC Operations Manual Oyster 3G AC Hardware OverviewOY3G_OPM_200 v7.0 for IPA1.0 © ip.access Limited 2011 Page 15
  • 23. LEDs The SCM LEDs are used as follows by an Oyster 3G AC: Label Function Colour Usage OOS Out of Service Amber or red Not used. PWR Power Green Steady green for normal operation ACT Active/Application Amber Steady amber for the Active SPM, flashing occasionally for the Standby SPM H/S Hot Swap Blue See section 9.2 for details about hot swap operation. ATCA-5010 Ejector Latches Ejector Latch Hot Swap LED Hot Swap Ejector Latch Each ATCA-5010 has two ejector latches. The upper latch is only used when inserting the card in a slot or removing it from its slot. The upper latch cannot be used when the thumbscrews have been tightened. The lower latch has a sliding lock mechanism, to prevent accidental hot swap. This is because the lower latch can be opened slightly even when the thumbscrews are tightened. Opening the latch even slightly will activate hot swap. To open the lower latch, move the sliding lock upwards then open the latch. If the card is not already in the hot swap state, the hot swap LED will start flashing and a shut down command will be sent to the operating system. The LED will turn steady blue once the card has shut down. To close the lower latch, simply push the latch home. The latch will lock in place and, assuming power is applied to chassis, the card will start up. See section 9.2 for details about hot swap operation.Oyster 3G AC Operations Manual Oyster 3G AC Hardware OverviewOY3G_OPM_200 v7.0 for IPA1.0 © ip.access Limited 2011 Page 16
  • 24. 2.5 ATCA-4300 SBC Card This is a single blade computer. Six of these provide the core management and application functionality of the Oyster 3G AC. These are designated as: • Management Card 0 • Management Card 1 • Stacks Card 0 • Stacks Card 1 • Call Control Card 0 • Call Control Card 1 Each ATCA-4300 card requires a 4GB Memory Kit (may be pre-fitted).Oyster 3G AC Operations Manual Oyster 3G AC Hardware OverviewOY3G_OPM_200 v7.0 for IPA1.0 © ip.access Limited 2011 Page 17
  • 25. 2.5.1 ATCA-4300 Front Panel Thumbscrew RadiSys ATCA-4300 Ejector Latch SER Serial Port Out Of Service LED USB Ports OOS USB 1 USB 0 Power LED PWR Application LED APP Reset Button RESET ETH A Ethernet Ports ETH B AMC Bay 1 Hot Swap LED H/S AMC Bay 2 Hot Swap Ejector Latch Thumbscrew Thumbscrews The thumbscrews secure the ATCA-4300 card in the chassis. They must be finger tight to ensure an ATCA-4300 cannot be ejected by accident, such as when it becomes necessary to put a card in the hot swap state with the hot swap ejector latch. The thumbscrews must not be over tightened. Ports The Serial Port provides console access to an ATCA-4300. This is used during AC installation for BIOS configuration. Once installation is complete, permanent terminals must be connected to the serial port for each Management Card for support purposes. Typically this is achieved with a terminal server. Permanent terminals on the Stacks Cards and Call Control Cards are optional. The USB ports are not generally used. However, they do support many USB storage devices, and this may be convenient in some cases for obtaining diagnostic files and/or backup archives.Oyster 3G AC Operations Manual Oyster 3G AC Hardware OverviewOY3G_OPM_200 v7.0 for IPA1.0 © ip.access Limited 2011 Page 18
  • 26. The first Ethernet port, labelled ETH A, is only used on the Management Cards for connection to the management network. This is mandatory on both Management Cards, so that the AC can connect to its managing OMC-R and other services on the management network. The ETH-A port is not used on the Stacks Cards and Call Control Cards. The ETH-B port on each ATCA-4300 card is reserved for debug/troubleshooting use. That is, it will only be used occasionally, usually by making a temporary connection to a local "maintenance network", which will often simply be a direct cable connection to a laptop. The Ethernet port labels on the front panel are not related to the port designation in the AC operating system. Within the operating system, eth0 corresponds to ETH A, and eth1 corresponds to ETH B. LEDs The ATCA-4300 LEDs are used as follows by an Oyster 3G AC: Label Function Colour Usage OOS Out of Service Amber or red Not used. PWR Power Green Steady green for normal operation APP Application specific Amber Not used H/S Hot Swap Blue See section 9.2 for details about hot swap operation. Reset Button Using the reset button is service affecting and using it is unsupported in an Oyster 3G AC. Therefore, do not press the reset button. AMC Bays Each ATCA-4300 card has two bays for Advanced Mezzanine Cards (AMCs). On each Management Card, AMC Bay 2 is used for the hard disk (AMC-3202). See section 2.6 for details about the hard disk. The AMC bays on the Stacks Cards and Call Control Cards are not used for any additional hardware. Unused AMC bays are occupied by non-functional filler modules.Oyster 3G AC Operations Manual Oyster 3G AC Hardware OverviewOY3G_OPM_200 v7.0 for IPA1.0 © ip.access Limited 2011 Page 19
  • 27. ATCA-4300 Ejector Latches Ejector Latch Hot Swap LED Hot Swap Ejector Latch Each ATCA-4300 has two ejector latches. The upper latch is only used when inserting the card in a slot or removing it from its slot. The upper latch cannot be used when the thumbscrews have been tightened. The lower latch has a sliding lock mechanism, to prevent accidental hot swap. This is because the lower latch can be opened slightly even when the thumbscrews are tightened. Opening the latch even slightly will activate hot swap. To open the lower latch, move the sliding lock upwards then open the latch. If the card is not already in the hot swap state, the hot swap LED will start flashing and a shut down command will be sent to the operating system. The LED will turn steady blue once the card has shut down. To close the lower latch, simply push the latch home. The latch will lock in place and, assuming power is applied to chassis, the card will start up. See section 9.2 for details about hot swap operation.Oyster 3G AC Operations Manual Oyster 3G AC Hardware OverviewOY3G_OPM_200 v7.0 for IPA1.0 © ip.access Limited 2011 Page 20
  • 28. 2.6 73GB Hard Disk AMC-3202 A 73GB or 147GB SAS enterprise hard drive storage module. This is an AMC that is mounted in the first two ATCA-4300 cards (the Management Cards) to provide the operating system and applications across the Oyster 3G AC. Note: The same size hard disks must be used in the Management Cards in an individual AC. This will ensure the partitions are identical on each hard disk, which is important for data synchronisation between the Management Cards.2.6.1 Hard Disk Partitioning The hard disk is partitioned according to the following scheme, which allows the AC to have two independent installations of the AC software: Hard Disk Partition Scheme Partition Notes Boot (/dev/sda1) GRUB boot partition, with default boot priority set to the current installation Root1 (/dev/sda2) Set A of partitions, with one installation of AC software Var1 (/dev/sda5) Home1 (/dev/sda6) Data 1 (/dev/sda9) Root2 (/dev/sda3) Set B of the partitions, can have a different version of AC software installed Var2 (/dev/sda7) Home2 (/dev/sda8) Data 2 (/dev/sda10) The Boot partition contains the boot loader configuration for selecting whether to boot from Root1 or Root2. Root (1 and 2) contains the root file system and /usr, and the AC application code for all of the cards. Var (1 and 2) contains most of the standard Linux /var directory including /var/run, /var/state and /var/lib. Home (1 and 2) contains log files, temporary files, home directories and downloaded files. Data (1 and 2) contains the AC database. Changes to this partition on the active Management Card are replicated in real time to the same partition on the standby Management Card.Oyster 3G AC Operations Manual Oyster 3G AC Hardware OverviewOY3G_OPM_200 v7.0 for IPA1.0 © ip.access Limited 2011 Page 21
  • 29. This partitioning scheme has the following benefits: • The boot partition can be configured to boot the AC from either Root1 or Root2 • There are two groups of partitions, Set A and Set B, which will have one installation of the current AC software, and one installation of the previous software release (in a newly installed AC Set B only contains a copy of the file system installed on Set A, but with minor configuration changes to reflect the use of different device names for each partition) • When upgrading an AC, new software can be installed and configured on the inactive set of partitions in advance of the maintenance window - switching to the new software is then a simple matter of updating the boot partition with the select_boot.sh utility • In the event of difficulty when upgrading the AC software, it is easy to rollback to the previous software release, by simply resetting the boot configuration to start from the relevant Root partition2.6.2 AMC-3202 Front Panel OOS Out Of Service LED Power LED PWR ACT Activity LED RadiSys AMC-3202 H/S Hot Swap LED Module Handle LEDs The AMC-3202 LEDs are used as follows by an Oyster 3G AC: Label Function Colour Usage OOS Out of Service Amber or red Not used. PWR Power Green Steady green for normal operation ACT Activity Amber Indicates HDD activity, read or write H/S Hot Swap Blue See section 9.2 for details about hot swap operation. AMC-3202 Module Handle Locked First Position Full Extension (3mm extension (for AMC removal for hot swap) or insertion) Use the module handle to lock an AMC into its Bay, put an AMC into the hot swap state and, when fully extended, remove an AMC from its Bay. See section 9.2 for details about hot swap operation.Oyster 3G AC Operations Manual Oyster 3G AC Hardware OverviewOY3G_OPM_200 v7.0 for IPA1.0 © ip.access Limited 2011 Page 22
  • 30. 2.7 ATCA-1200 Carrier Card A Carrier Card has four bays for Advanced Mezzanine Cards (AMCs). Unused AMC bays are occupied by non-functional filler modules. Different AMCs installed in the Carrier Cards provide the AC with ATM connectivity to the core network and Ethernet connectivity for termination of the Iu+ connections with the Oyster 3G APs. In the standard configuration, an AC has two Carrier Cards.Oyster 3G AC Operations Manual Oyster 3G AC Hardware OverviewOY3G_OPM_200 v7.0 for IPA1.0 © ip.access Limited 2011 Page 23
  • 31. 2.7.1 ATCA-1200 Front Panel Thumbscrew Ejector Latch AMC Bay 1 OOS Out Of Service LED PWR Power LED APP Application LED AMC Bay 2 AMC Bay 3 Reset Reset Button H/S Hot Swap LED AMC Bay 4 Hot Swap Ejector Latch Thumbscrew Thumbscrews The thumbscrews secure the ATCA-1200 card in the chassis. They must be finger tight to ensure an ATCA-1200 cannot be ejected by accident, such as when it becomes necessary to put a card in the hot swap state with the hot swap ejector latch. The thumbscrews must not be over tightened. LEDs The ATCA-1200 LEDs are used as follows by an Oyster 3G AC: Label Function Colour Usage OOS Out of Service Amber or red Not used. PWR Power Green Steady green for normal operation APP Application specific Amber Not used H/S Hot Swap Blue See section 9.2 for details about hot swap operation.Oyster 3G AC Operations Manual Oyster 3G AC Hardware OverviewOY3G_OPM_200 v7.0 for IPA1.0 © ip.access Limited 2011 Page 24
  • 32. Reset Button Using the reset button is service affecting and using it is unsupported in an Oyster 3G AC. Therefore, do not press the reset button. AMC Bays Each ATCA-1200 card has four bays for Advanced Mezzanine Cards (AMCs). The AMC Bays are occupied as follows: Slot Slot 9 10 iSPAN 3650 OOS OOS (Bay 1) PWR PWR APP APP iSPAN 3650 (Bay 2) AMC Bay 3 - empty (i.e. filler module only) Reset Reset H/S H/S Quad Gigabit Ethernet AMC-7211 (Bay 4) See section 2.8 for details about the iSPAN 3650. See section 2.9 for details about the AMC-7211.Oyster 3G AC Operations Manual Oyster 3G AC Hardware OverviewOY3G_OPM_200 v7.0 for IPA1.0 © ip.access Limited 2011 Page 25
  • 33. ATCA-1200 Ejector Latches Ejector Latch Hot Swap LED Hot Swap Ejector Latch Each ATCA-1200 has two ejector latches. The upper latch is only used when inserting the card in a slot or removing it from its slot. The upper latch cannot be used when the thumbscrews have been tightened. The lower latch has a sliding lock mechanism, to prevent accidental hot swap. This is because the lower latch can be opened slightly even when the thumbscrews are tightened. Opening the latch even slightly will activate hot swap. To open the lower latch, move the sliding lock upwards then open the latch. If the card is not already in the hot swap state, the hot swap LED will start flashing and a shut down command will be sent to the operating system. The LED will turn steady blue once the card has shut down. To close the lower latch, simply push the latch home. The latch will lock in place and, assuming power is applied to chassis, the card will start up. See section 9.2 for details about hot swap operation.Oyster 3G AC Operations Manual Oyster 3G AC Hardware OverviewOY3G_OPM_200 v7.0 for IPA1.0 © ip.access Limited 2011 Page 26
  • 34. 2.8 iSPAN 3650 AMC for ATM An iSPAN 3650 AMC provides ATM links to the core network. Each iSPAN 3650 is mounted in an ATCA-1200 Carrier Card.2.8.1 iSPAN 3650 Front Panel Out Of Service LED Power LED 0 CPU CPU LED 1 Optical SFP Sockets 2 Line LED 3 Hot Swap LED Module Handle Optical SFP Sockets Four sockets for optical SFPs, typically OC3 SFPs. Any pair of sockets can be used for APS 1+1 link protection. LEDs The iSPAN 3650 LEDs are used as follows by an Oyster 3G AC: Label Function Colour Usage OOS Out of Service Red Not used. PWR Power Green or red Steady green for normal operation 0 to 3 Line Green or red Green when a link is established, red when link is down or not used CPU CPU Amber or green Green for normal operation H/S Hot Swap Blue See section 9.2 for details about hot swap operation.Oyster 3G AC Operations Manual Oyster 3G AC Hardware OverviewOY3G_OPM_200 v7.0 for IPA1.0 © ip.access Limited 2011 Page 27
  • 35. Reset Button Using the reset button is service affecting and using it is unsupported in an Oyster 3G AC. Therefore, do not press the reset button. iSPAN 3650 Module Handle Locked First Position Full Extension (3mm extension (for AMC removal for hot swap) or insertion) Use the module handle to lock an AMC into its Bay, put an AMC into the hot swap state and, when fully extended, remove an AMC from its Bay. See section 9.2 for details about hot swap operation.2.8.2 Optical (OC3) SFP Fit this to the iSPAN 3650 to provide the connection point for optical (OC3 or OC12) cabling. Note: Item may differ from illustration.Oyster 3G AC Operations Manual Oyster 3G AC Hardware OverviewOY3G_OPM_200 v7.0 for IPA1.0 © ip.access Limited 2011 Page 28
  • 36. 2.9 Quad Gigabit Ethernet AMC-7211 for Iu+ An AMC-7211 provides high-speed Ethernet connectivity to the wide area network (Internet), for termination of the Iu+ interface to Oyster 3G APs. Each AMC-7211 is mounted in an ATCA-1200 Carrier Card. The AMC-7211 can have up to four Ethernet SFPs installed, each of which provides a 1Gb network connection.2.9.1 AMC-7211 Front Panel Out Of Service LED OOS RadiSys PWR Power LED LS Link Status LED SFP1 PS Port Status LED LS Ethernet SFP Sockets SFP2 PS RST Reset Button LS SFP3 PS LS SFP4 PS AMC-7211 Hot Swap LED Module Handle H/S Ethernet SFP Sockets While the AMC-7211 has four sockets for SFPs, typically only one Ethernet SFP will be needed for most traffic models.Oyster 3G AC Operations Manual Oyster 3G AC Hardware OverviewOY3G_OPM_200 v7.0 for IPA1.0 © ip.access Limited 2011 Page 29
  • 37. LEDs The AMC-7211 LEDs are used as follows by an Oyster 3G AC: Label Function Colour Usage OOS Out of Service Amber or red Not used. PWR Power Green Steady green for normal operation. LS Link Status (one for Amber or green Green for a 1Gbps link, and flashing shows each SFP socket) activity. Off when there is no link or no SFP is installed. PS Port Status (one for Amber or green Steady green for normal operation. Off when each SFP socket there is no link or no SFP is installed. H/S Hot Swap Blue See section 9.2 for details about hot swap operation. Reset Button Using the reset button is service affecting and using it is unsupported in an Oyster 3G AC. Therefore, do not press the reset button. AMC-7211 Module Handle Locked First Position Full Extension (3mm extension (for AMC removal for hot swap) or insertion) Use the module handle to lock an AMC into its Bay, put an AMC into the hot swap state and, when fully extended, remove an AMC from its Bay. See section 9.2 for details about hot swap operation.2.9.2 Ethernet SFP Fit this to the AMC-7211 to provide the connection point for Ethernet cabling. Note: Item may differ from illustration.Oyster 3G AC Operations Manual Oyster 3G AC Hardware OverviewOY3G_OPM_200 v7.0 for IPA1.0 © ip.access Limited 2011 Page 30
  • 38. 2.10 Oyster 3G AC Hardware Redundancy Summary Much of the hardware in an AC is duplicated to provided hardware redundancy. Under System Release IPA1.0, the software implementation that utilitises the redundant hardware is termed Elevated Availability. See section 4 for more information about application behaviour. See section 9 for information about replacing failed hardware.2.10.1 SBC Redundancy The cards in the first six slots of the AC chassis are the Single Blade Computer (SBC) cards that provide call processing and management for the AC.The cards are designated to different roles in pairs, with instance 0 and 1 of each card type: • Management Card 0 (Slot 1) • Management Card 1 (Slot 2) • Stacks Card 0 (Slot 3) • Stacks Card 1 (Slot 4) • Call Control Card 0 (Slot 5) • Call Control Card 1 (Slot 6) When the AC applications start up, one card from each pair is designated as hosting the Active applications and one card is designated as hosting the Standy applications. In a normal start up scenario, the instance 0 cards will be Active and the instance 1 cards will be Standby. That is, the slot 1, 3, and 5 cards are Active, and 2, 4, and 6 are Standby. The applications on the Active cards provide service. In the event of a failure on the Active card, the applications on the Standby card will take over. See section 3.1.2 and 3.1.2 for more details about SBC startup. The Management Cards also have hard disks. A key item stored on the hard disk is a database system that contains information about the AC and connected APs. This is replicated in real time from the Active Managemen Card to the hard disk in the Standby Management Card. See section 3.1.2 for more details about data replication. A failed SBC card can only be replaced without affecting service if it is properly prepared and configured in a spare chassis before it is installed in the target AC.2.10.2 SCM and SPM Redundancy The SCMs and their SPMs operate as a redundant pair. That is, one SCM along with its SPM is active and the other is on standby. The redundant functionality of the SCM is built-in, which also extends to the SPM for each SCM. If an SCM or its SPM fails, the standby SCM and its SPM will become active. The SPM for an SCM is its RTM (rear transmission module) installed in the corresponding slot in the back of the chassis, as described in section 2.4. None of the other cards have RTMs. An RTM cannot operate independently of the main card installed in the front slot. Also, each SCM is dependent on its SPM for some of the functionality it provides in the AC chassis. This is why a failure in either component triggers a fail over to the standby SCM and its SPM.Oyster 3G AC Operations Manual Oyster 3G AC Hardware OverviewOY3G_OPM_200 v7.0 for IPA1.0 © ip.access Limited 2011 Page 31
  • 39. The most important functionality provided by an SCM is network switching. If an SCM fails, the change of switching to the other SCM triggers an AC application restart. See section 3.1.1 for more details about SCM start up. A failed SCM or SPM can only be replaced without affecting service if it is properly prepared and configured in a spare chassis before it is installed in the target AC.2.10.3 Carrier Card Redundancy and Iu and Iu+ Interface Card Redundancy Although there are two Carrier Cards, four Iu/ATM interface cards and two Iu+ interface cards, redundancy behaviour is entirely dependent on implementation and integration. At the Carrier Card level, hardware redundancy is only possible if all the interfaces are configured to use one Carrier Card, with standby interfaces ready to take over if that Carrier Card fails. As this requires configuration support from outside the AC on two different interfaces, it may not be practical to implement this type of redundancy. Alternatively, configure redundancy at the level of the Iu and Iu+ interface cards or at the level of the interfaces. In most cases, it is unlikely that it will be possible to replace a failed Carrier Card without affecting service. However, service impact can be minimised if it the replacement Carrier Card properly prepared and configured in a spare chassis before it is installed in the target AC. Iu Card and Interface Redundancy A full discussion of Iu configuration is outside the scope of this manual. However, some points to note are: • Iu-CS and Iu-PS should be implemented on both Carrier Cards, so that if one Carrier Card fails, both domains are still available. • It is possible to put Iu-CS and Iu-PS interfaces on all four Iu interface cards, so that by load sharing across all four cards, failure of a single card has the minimum service impact. • Optical port redundancy can be implemented using APS 1+1. A failed Iu interface card can only be replaced without affecting service if it is properly prepared and configured in a spare chassis before it is installed in the target AC. Iu+ Card and Interface Redundancy A full discussion of Iu+ configuration is outside the scope of this manual. However, some points to note are: • Each Iu+ interface card has full traffic capacity for the AC. • Using an external router, AP connections can be shared between the two Iu+ interface cards, which reduces service impact of a card failure. The AP population on the failed card will reconnect to the remaining working card. A failed Iu+ interface card can only be replaced without affecting service if it is properly prepared and configured in a spare chassis before it is installed in the target AC.Oyster 3G AC Operations Manual Oyster 3G AC Hardware OverviewOY3G_OPM_200 v7.0 for IPA1.0 © ip.access Limited 2011 Page 32
  • 40. 2.10.4 PEM Redundancy Each PEM is capable of supplying full power to the chassis. Hence, having two PEMs provides hardware redundancy for the power input. If one PEM fails, or if the power supply to one PEM fails, the platform continues to operate using the power supplied by the other PEM. A failed PEM can be replaced without affecting operation of the AC.2.10.5 AMM Redundancy Four air mover modules (AMMs) cool the AC. If one AMM fails, the AC continues to be cooled by the three other AMMs. A failed AMM can be replaced without affecting operation of the AC.Oyster 3G AC Operations Manual Oyster 3G AC Hardware OverviewOY3G_OPM_200 v7.0 for IPA1.0 © ip.access Limited 2011 Page 33
  • 41. 3 Oyster 3G AC Operating Basics This section provides basic information, including some examples, about the operation of the Oyster 3G AC.3.1 Oyster 3G AC Startup This section describes how each type of card starts up from powering on the AC. When the chassis is switched on from a power off state, a correctly configured AC will start up and attempt to start providing service.3.1.1 SCMs The SCMs will usually only need to start up when the chassis as a whole is powered up. The SCMs boot from the built in Linux operating system. Once the SCMs have started up, one of them becomes the active SCM and the other is the standby that will take over in the event of a failure in the active SCM. The operation of the Switch and Control Modules (SCMs) is not dependent on any of the other cards in the AC. Generally, while the chassis has power the SCMs will remain operational regardless of the state of the other cards. This is necessary because the other cards are dependent on the SCMs to provide internal network capability within the AC (backplane network). Hence, the SCMs will operate continuously unless: • The chassis is powered down • One or both SCMs develop a fault • One or both SCMs is deliberately restarted by a user As the SCM performs internal network switching, the rest of the cards cannot communicate across the backplane networks if both of the SCMs are non-functional.3.1.2 Management Cards When power is applied to the AC, the Management Card in slot 1 will usually be the primary Management Card for database replication, and will host the active applications. Each Management Cards starts up from its hard disk. The hard disk contains two sets of partitions (set A and B, as described in 2.6.1 Hard Disk Partitioning), plus a very small boot partition. Each partition set can contain a different version of AC software. A configuration file in the boot partition directs the boot process to start the operating system installed on partition set A or B. To determine which hard disk partition set the Management Card is using, inspect the /proc/cmdline file: # cat /proc/cmdline This will return a single line, indicating the root device. For example: root=/dev/sda2 ro selinux=0 console=ttyS0,115200n8 panic=10 • If the root device is /dev/sda2, as in the example, the Management Card is running from partition set A. • If the root device is /dev/sda3, the Management Card is running from partition set B.Oyster 3G AC Operations Manual Oyster 3G AC Operating BasicsOY3G_OPM_200 v7.0 for IPA1.0 © ip.access Limited 2011 Page 34
  • 42. Both Management Cards must start the same version of AC software. As a general rule, the sets of partitions should be kept in sync with software versions, and should therefore boot from the same partition set. To see the current AC software version, inspect the /etc/mks-version file: # cat /etc/mks-version The first line of output shows the AC software version, as per the ip.access internal build reference. For example: MKS Label: SR1.1.0-84.0 If the AC, has had patches applied, this should have been updated to show the most recent patch. For example: MKS Label: SR1.1.0-84.0 Patch_12.6 The hard disk partition scheme includes a special data replication partition. This partition provides real time data synchronisation between the two Management Cards using the DRBD service. During startup, one of the Management Cards will become the Primary for data replication. This is arbitrated automatically between the Management Cards, but is usually the Management Card in slot 1. The following diagram summarises this: Management Card in Slot 1 Management Card in Slot 2 operating as DRBD Primary operating as DRBD Secondary boot directive to boot directive to live partition set alternative live partition set alternative boot partition set for boot partition set for rollback/upgrade rollback/upgrade root root root root A var var B A var var B home home home home data data data data real time data synchronisation The initial selection of the synchronisation primary takes place before the AC middleware and applications start. The data partition is mainly used to store the database used by the AC applications. Therefore, once the AC applications are running, the DRBD Primary can be switched between the Management Cards according to which Management Card is running the active database service used by the AC applications. Once the operating system is running on the Management Cards, the other cards that need to start from software stored on the Management Cards can also complete their start up procedures. The AC application software will attempt to become operational, and is expected to do so if there are no fault conditions.Oyster 3G AC Operations Manual Oyster 3G AC Operating BasicsOY3G_OPM_200 v7.0 for IPA1.0 © ip.access Limited 2011 Page 35
  • 43. 3.1.3 Stacks Cards and Call Control Cards The Stacks Cards and Call Control Cards use built-in DHCP and TFTP clients to obtain the operating system boot image from whichever of the Management Cards responds first. As the operating system boots up, it determines the location of the card on which it is running. Based on this, the card requests and loads the appropriate application image from either of the Management Cards, so that two cards start up as Stacks Cards (in Slots 3 and 4) and the other two cards start up as the Call Control Cards (in Slots 5 and 6).3.1.4 Carrier Cards and AMCs Each Carrier Card has a built-in operating system and can start up regardless of the state of other cards in the AC. However, startup of the Advanced Mezzanine Cards (AMCs) installed in the Carrier Card bays depends on the type of card: • ATM Interface Card (iSPAN 3650) - this card starts up from an internal operating system and waits until it is configured by AC application startup • Iu+ Interface Card (AMC-7211) - this card uses built-in DHCP and TFTP clients which obtain boot images and application software from one of the Management Cards, such as the de-multiplexer application for incoming traffic from APs, then the card waits until it is configured by AC application startup3.2 AC Interfaces The three main external interfaces for an AC are: • Iu+ links with the APs, carried over Ethernet • Iu links with the core network, carried over ATM • Management link with the OMC-R, carried over Ethernet The following diagram summarises the physical connections for these interfaces: OMC-R Server Iu-CS links ATM Iu towards Management CN Network (Gb Ethernet) Management Iu-PS links Link 4 x iSPAN 3650 AMC 2 x AMC-7211 IP towards OMC-R Clients HDD APs Iu+ links and/or AMC-3202 Networked Configuration Terminals 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 Management Stacks Call Control SCM Carrier Card Card Card ATCA-2210 Card ATCA-4300 ATCA-4300 ATCA-4300 ATCA-1200Oyster 3G AC Operations Manual Oyster 3G AC Operating BasicsOY3G_OPM_200 v7.0 for IPA1.0 © ip.access Limited 2011 Page 36
  • 44. The following diagram loosely approximates how these interfaces are related internally: Management link to OMC-R Server Access Controller Management Card front panel Eth port Processing Cards (Management, Stacks, Call Control) Management Signalling and Plane Control Plane Processing Processing AP Related Management Signalling and Plane Traffic Control Control CS links to RTP to APs Plane Traffic MSC and MGWs Iu+ Iu over ATM Interface Interface Iu+ Cards Cards Iu over ATM (AMC-7211) (iSPAN 3650) RTP from APs, User Plane Traffic PS links Optionally Multiplexed to SGSN(s) Points to note in respect of these diagrams include: • User plane traffic is touched as lightly as possible by the AC. • As a minimum, the AC assesses all received signalling and control plane traffic. In some cases, this is intercepted and handled by the AC. For example, for RANAP location reporting, the AC responds to the location request on behalf of the UE, according to the stored location of the AP that the UE is attached to. • The AC also assesses all received management plane traffic. This is to determine the destination and, for information received from the APs, whethor or not to forward information to the OMC-R. • Iu+ uses RTP to carry all traffic between the AC and each connected AP. This is optionally multiplexed on the uplink to reduce bandwith requirements, which counteracts reduced uplink bandwidth availability on broadband connections. The multiplexed stream is demultiplexed in the Iu+ interface card, before the traffic is forwarded to the next destination. • There will only be one active management link between the AC and the OMC-R, as initiated by the active Management Card. Note: Serial port access is not included in these diagrams, as serial ports are not used for any user, control, signalling or management traffic. The serial ports are needed for maintenance access to the AC, as needed in various circumstances.Oyster 3G AC Operations Manual Oyster 3G AC Operating BasicsOY3G_OPM_200 v7.0 for IPA1.0 © ip.access Limited 2011 Page 37
  • 45. 3.3 User Accounts on an AC All the main cards in the AC have a root user account. As the Management Cards are the points of contact with the Management Network, additional user accounts are provided for different purposes. The following user accounts are provided on the Management Cards only: • ac_installer • admin • apdiag The other cards in an AC use the root login account only. This is because they are only accessible via the backplane network or, in the case of the SCMs, via serial ports. The SCM serial ports should be protected by either a terminal server or by being directly connected to a terminal which can only be accessed on site. The following points of connection should be available for logging into an AC: • Management Cards • Ethernet connection to the management network • Serial port connection for console access • SCMs • Serial port connection for console access3.4 Internal AC IP Addresses The AC has an internal network, sometimes referred to as the backplane network. This section explains how the IP addresses on the backplane network are assigned to the main cards and AMCs in the AC chassis. The switching for the backplane network is provided by the SCMs. The IP addresses on this network are fixed, and they are assigned according to the hardware location within the chassis. The backplane network uses the following private address range: 192.168.16.<1..255>3.4.1 Main Card IP Addresses The main cards in the slots at the front of the chassis have the following IP addresses: 192.168.16.<slot> Where <slot> is the physical slot number from 1 to 14. However, as only slots 1 to 10 are used in a standard AC build, <slot> will be from 1 to 10 in practice. Hence the backplane addresses of the main cards are: Card Slot IP Address Management Card (instance 0) 1 192.168.16.1 Management Card (instance 1) 2 192.168.16.2 Stacks Card (instance 0) 3 192.168.16.3 Stacks Card (instance 1) 4 192.168.16.4 Call Control Card (instance 0) 5 192.168.16.5Oyster 3G AC Operations Manual Oyster 3G AC Operating BasicsOY3G_OPM_200 v7.0 for IPA1.0 © ip.access Limited 2011 Page 38
  • 46. Card Slot IP Address Call Control Card (instance 1) 6 192.168.16.6 SCM 7 192.168.16.7 SCM 8 192.168.16.8 Carrier Card 9 192.168.16.9 Carrier Card 10 192.168.16.10 The chassis can also have RTMs in the slots at the back of the chassis. In an AC, only the SCMs have any RTMs. As the RTMs are add-ons to the cards in the front slots, they do not have their own IP addresses, and hence they are not accessed separately on the backplane network.3.4.2 AMC Bay IP Addresses The AMCs bays also have IP addresses on the same private network, as follows: 192.168.16.<slot x 16 + logical bay number x 4> Where: • slot is the physical slot number of the card hosting the AMC. • logical bay number is from 0 to 3, which is the physical bay number of the AMC bay minus 1 In practice, only the Carrier Cards in slots 9 and 10 have AMCs fitted that are capable of using the backplane network. The hard disks in the Management Cards do not use the backplane network. As an example, consider the iSPAN 3650 in Bay 1 of the Slot 9 Carrier Card. The last part of the IP address is: slot x 16 + logical bay number x 4 which is 9 x 16 + 0x4 which is 144 + 0 Giving a final IP address of: 192.168.16.144 Hence the backplane addresses of the AMCs that use the backplane are: AMC Slot Bay Calculation IP Address ATM Interface Card: iSPAN 3650 9 1 9 x 16 + (1 -1) x 4 192.168.16.144 ATM Interface Card: iSPAN 3650 9 2 9 x 16 + (2 -1) x 4 192.168.16.148 Iu+ Interface Card: AMC-7211 9 4 9 x 16 + (4 -1) x 4 192.168.16.156 ATM Interface Card: iSPAN 3650 10 1 10 x 16 + (1 -1) x 4 192.168.16.160 ATM Interface Card: iSPAN 3650 10 2 10 x 16 + (2 -1) x 4 192.168.16.164 Iu+ Interface Card: AMC-7211 10 4 10 x 16 + (4 -1) x 4 192.168.16.172Oyster 3G AC Operations Manual Oyster 3G AC Operating BasicsOY3G_OPM_200 v7.0 for IPA1.0 © ip.access Limited 2011 Page 39
  • 47. Notice that the IP addresses are in steps of 4 from one AMC bay to the next. This is because the IP address calculated here is the first address in a block of 4 addresses that an AMC can use. However, the three additional addresses are not used by the AMCs in an AC.3.5 General Tips for Working with ACs3.5.1 Mandated Changes Only Do not change anything on a live operational AC unless it is mandated in an approved procedure, typically during a maintenance window. ACs are usual installed in a controlled systems environment and it is not acceptable to take unauthorised actions on ACs in this environment. This could interrupt service from an AC or cause alarms. In particular, do not use experimental settings on an AC that is operational on a 3G network. Instead, use an AC in the lab to experiment on first. Even the most seasoned operators can hit problems.3.5.2 AC Memory Usage - No Swap Space The ACs are real time systems so they are configured without any swap space. This means consideration must be given to the memory impact of using commands when logged into an AC. If the memory on an AC component (such as the Management Card, Stacks Card and so on) is exhausted, the AC can kill off processes indiscriminately, thereby disrupting service. Also bear in mind that applications can sometimes leak memory, so always check the memory space first. Do not use vi or vim to view large files. Instead, use the less command. The less command does not load the entire file into memory. If it is necessary to edit files, consider using WinSCP to view and edit files. However, remember WinScp will not preserve the execute flag.3.5.3 Using the AC CLI (debug.sh) The utility debug.sh is useful for checking the status of AC applications in detail. For basic health checks, it is recommended to use the health check utility, as described in section 5.1.2. The CLI is not designed for multi-user access. Therefore, always quit the utility immediately after any status checks are complete. Section 11.1 describes how to use the AC CLI.3.5.4 Communicate when Changing the State of an AC There may be other users logged into an AC. Therefore, before making alterations or changing the state of the AC, use the who command to see if other users are logged in. For example: # who ac_installer pts/0 Jul 10 09:17 (172.28.5.210) admin pts/2 Jul 10 09:29 (172.28.1.218)Oyster 3G AC Operations Manual Oyster 3G AC Operating BasicsOY3G_OPM_200 v7.0 for IPA1.0 © ip.access Limited 2011 Page 40
  • 48. This shows that two users are logged in, one as admin and one as ac_installer, so there is another user logged into this AC. Use the wall command to send messages. For example: # wall "Fred: Hi. I need to do something. Who else is logged in?" Use your name in the wall messages. When logged in as root, other users will not know who you are.3.6 AC Stop and Start Procedures This section describes procedures for stopping and starting the AC.3.6.1 Determine the Primary Management Card The AC has two Management Cards. One of the cards will be the Primary for synchronising the data partition. The data partition is a special hard disk partition managed by a dedicated service called DRBD. The DRBD service handles the real time replication of the data partition. Any operation that changes the data partition is not treated as complete until the change is acknowledged on both the Primary and Secondary. As the data partition contains the database used by the AC applications, this means that the AC database is replicated in real time from the Primary to the Secondary. Management Card in Slot 1 Management Card in Slot 2 operating as DRBD Primary operating as DRBD Secondary boot directive to boot directive to live partition set alternative live partition set alternative boot partition set for boot partition set for rollback/upgrade rollback/upgrade root root root root A var var B A var var B home home home home data data data data real time data synchronisation The card operating as Primary will host the active AC applications. The other Management Card, operating as the Secondary, hosts the standby AC applications and waits to take over in the event of a failure. Many operations that have operational implications need to take place on the Primary Management Card. In some cases, operations must be completed on both Management Cards. Whenever it is necessary to determine the Primary Management Card, use the following procedure: 1) Login to the Management Card in slot 1 as the admin user. The admin user’s Main Menu will appear: Main Menu 1) Linux ShellOyster 3G AC Operations Manual Oyster 3G AC Operating BasicsOY3G_OPM_200 v7.0 for IPA1.0 © ip.access Limited 2011 Page 41
  • 49. 2) ASP Debug Console 3) Quit Option: 2) At the Option prompt, type 1 and press <Enter>. The Linux shell prompt ($) will appear. 3) Run the command: $ cat /proc/drbd The output will contain a line similar to the following: 1: cs:Connected ro:Primary/Secondary ds:UpToDate/UpToDate C r---- 4) The part of the line of interest is where it shows Primary/Secondary. In this case, as Primary is first, this means the Management Card in slot 1 is the current Primary. If this shows Secondary/Primary, then the card in slot 2 is the current Primary. 5) If no other actions are required, use exit to finish the shell session, then option 3 to Quit the admin user session.3.6.2 Power Down an Oyster 3G AC To completely power down an AC, first shut down both Management Cards using one of the procedures in the following sections, and then power off the AC. Any further actions until the AC restarts, including restarting the AC, will require local access. This will be service affecting. To power down an AC, physical access to the AC is required. 1) First shut down both Management Cards. Determine the primary Management Card, as in section 3.6.1, then shut down the secondary Management Card first. Use whichever method is most convenient or possible for each Management Card. 2) Switch off the AC using the power switches on the PEMs (power entry modules) at the rear of the AC. 3) If preferred, also switch off the power supply that feeds the PEMS, either using a suitable circuit breaker or at the mains.3.6.3 Command Line Shut Down Use the following procedure to shut down a Management Card from the command line. This can be done remotely over a network connection, but may require local support to start up the AC when any other work is complete. When both Management Cards are shut down, this effectively shuts down the AC as the AC can no longer provide service. If this is required, first shut down the secondary Management Card, then the primary Management Card.Oyster 3G AC Operations Manual Oyster 3G AC Operating BasicsOY3G_OPM_200 v7.0 for IPA1.0 © ip.access Limited 2011 Page 42
  • 50. To shut down a Management Card: 1) Login to the Management Card as root. 2) Shut down the Management Card with the following command: # shutdown -h now 3) If using an ssh session, it will be terminated. The hot swap LED will flash until the Management Card has completely shut down. The hot swap LED on the Management Card will turn steady blue when the shut down is complete.3.6.4 Shut Down with the Hot Swap Latch Use this procedure to shut down a Management Cards with its hot swap latch. This is useful if it is not possible to log in to the Management Card. 1) Before proceeding, ensure the thumbscrews that secure each Management Card in the chassis are tightened up. This will ensure the Hot Swap Ejector Latch will only disengage slightly, which is sufficient to initiate the hot swap command without allowing the card to eject from the slot. 2) Disengage the Hot Swap Ejector Latch. When using this method to shut down both cards, do this on both Management Cards at the same time. The Management Card will receive a shut down command and the blue hot swap LED will start flashing. Ejector Latch Hot Swap LED Hot Swap Ejector Latch Note: The illustration shows a hot swap ejector latch with a sliding lock mechanism. This may be implemented differently on some hot swap ejector latches. The hot swap ejector latch is at the lower end of the card, as illustrated. 3) The hot swap LED will flash until the Management Card has completely shut down. This will take a few minutes. Wait until the hot swap LED stops flashing and turns steady blue. The Management Card has now shut down. If both Management Cards are in the hot swap state, the AC has effectively shut down and, if required, can be powered down. Note: If a hot swap ejector latch is re-engaged, the card will restart.Oyster 3G AC Operations Manual Oyster 3G AC Operating BasicsOY3G_OPM_200 v7.0 for IPA1.0 © ip.access Limited 2011 Page 43
  • 51. 3.6.5 Power Up an Oyster 3G AC This procedure assumes that the AC is currently powered down. 1) If any hot swap ejector latches are open, particularly on the Management Cards, first ensure that they are locked. Note: If there is any hardware that should not start up, the ejector latches on those cards can be left unlocked. 2) Ensure external power is supplied to the power entry modules (PEMs). 3) Switch on the AC using the power switches on the PEMs at the rear of the AC. 4) The AC will start up.3.6.6 Soft Restarts Command line options can be used to: • Restart the AC application processes • Reboot the Stacks Card, Call Control Card and Carrier Card • Reboot the AC from the Management Card Warning About app-reset The AC applications can be manually stopped and started using the app-reset utility, by using the stop, start and restart command line parameters. DO NOT, under any circumstances, run app-reset unless it is actually necessary to manually stop, start or restart the AC applications. Any usage of app-reset is service affecting, even if it is executed with no command line parameters. Also, DO NOT use any other command line parameters with app-reset. In all cases, this will cause a restart of the AC applications. For example, DO NOT attempt to check the status of the AC applications by using a "status" command line parameter with app-reset. Restart the AC Application Processes If it is necessary to stop, start or reset the AC application processes, use the following instructions: 1) Login to either Management Card as root. 2) To stop the AC applications, execute the following command: # /etc/init.d/app-reset stop 3) To start the AC applications, execute the following command: # /etc/init.d/app-reset start Whichever Management Card was used to execute this command will now be the Management Card that hosts the active AC applications, and the other Management Card will be on standby.Oyster 3G AC Operations Manual Oyster 3G AC Operating BasicsOY3G_OPM_200 v7.0 for IPA1.0 © ip.access Limited 2011 Page 44
  • 52. Note: The XML configuration files are copied to the Stacks Cards and Call Control Cards by this command. This will happen every time the AC applications are started. Any changes made directly to XML files on the Stacks Cards or Call Control Cards will be lost as soon as the applications are started or restarted. Therefore, only make changes to the XML files on the Management Cards. 4) To restart the AC applications, execute the following command: # /etc/init.d/app-reset restart Whichever Management Card was used to execute this command will now be the Management Card that hosts the active AC applications, and the other Management Card will be on standby. Note: The XML configuration files are copied to the Stacks Cards and Call Control Cards by this command. This will happen every time the AC applications are started. Any changes made directly to XML files on the Stacks Cards or Call Control Cards will be lost as soon as the applications are started or restarted. Therefore, only make changes to the XML files on the Management Cards. Reboot the Diskless Cards Use this procedure to reboot the Stacks Cards, Call Control Cards and Carrier Cards. Only use this procedure if it is necessary to restart any of these cards while the AC applications are stopped. 1) Login to either Management Card as root via an ssh session. 2) If the applications are running, stop them: # /etc/init.d/app-reset stop 3) Reboot the Stacks Cards, Call Control Cards and Carrier Cards: # /etc/init.d/dc-reset powercycle The Stacks Cards and Call Control Cards will reboot from the shared boot image on either Management Card and then load the relevant application images. 4) Allow 5 minutes for the cards to restart. 5) Use the ping option of the health check command as a quick check that all the cards are starting up: # hc --ping Ping test on all active slots/cards Checking Card type Management Card - Slot 2 [192.168.16.2] : reachable Checking Card type Stacks Card - Slot 3 [192.168.16.3] : reachable Checking Card type Stacks Card - Slot 3 [192.168.16.4] : reachable Checking Card type Call Control Card - Slot 3 [192.168.16.5] : reachable Checking Card type Call Control Card - Slot 3 [192.168.16.6] : reachable Checking Card type SCM - Slot 7 [192.168.16.7] : reachable Checking Card type SCM - Slot 8 [192.168.16.8] : reachable Checking Card type Carrier Card - Slot 9 [192.168.16.9] : reachable Checking Card type Carrier Card - Slot 10 [192.168.16.10] : reachable Checking Card type iSPAN Slot 9 / Bay 1 [192.168.16.144] : reachableOyster 3G AC Operations Manual Oyster 3G AC Operating BasicsOY3G_OPM_200 v7.0 for IPA1.0 © ip.access Limited 2011 Page 45
  • 53. Checking Card type iSPAN Slot 9 / Bay 2 [192.168.16.148] : reachable Checking Card type iSPAN Slot 10 / Bay 1 [192.168.16.160] : reachable Checking Card type iSPAN Slot 10 / Bay 2 [192.168.16.164] : reachable Checking Card type Cavium Slot 9 [192.168.16.156] : reachable Checking Card type Cavium Slot 10 [192.168.16.172] : reachable Note: The last two cards may not respond until the AC applications have started. 6) Repeat the command as needed. Once all the cards respond, wait another 5 minutes to ensure the cards have completely started up. 7) Start the AC applications: # /etc/init.d/app-reset start Note: Ignore any errors that may appear when the script attempts to stop any existing processes. Also ignore messages relating to low values for IP addresses. 8) Wait for about 5 minutes, then confirm that the AC applications are running correctly. Reboot a Management Card 1) Login to the Management Card as root. 2) Reboot the Management Card with the following command: # shutdown -r now 3) The Management Card will reboot. 4) If this is the only functioning Management Card, it will attempt to start the AC applications. If the other Management Card is already operational, and the AC is providing service, the restarted Management Card will go into a standby state.3.7 AC Message Logging The logging mechanism puts log messages from the AC applications into log files stored under /var/log. To prevent the log files becoming very large due to large volumes of log messages in short time spans, the log files are rotated every minute. To accommodate this, the log files are stored under /var/log with the following naming convention: <day>/<hour>/messages.<minute> For example, for the 9th minute after 8pm on the 14th day of the month: 14/20/messages.09 Any messages.<minute> file older than 5 minutes is compressed, to give the file name: messages.<minute>.gzOyster 3G AC Operations Manual Oyster 3G AC Operating BasicsOY3G_OPM_200 v7.0 for IPA1.0 © ip.access Limited 2011 Page 46
  • 54. 3.7.1 Log File Retention The default log file retention time is 12 hours. This can be changed with the KEEP_HOURS variable at the beginning of the file: /etc/cron.minutely/archive.sh Only enter whole numbers for the KEEP_HOURS variable. The minimum value is 1. When increasing the value above 12, first allow the AC to run at typical capacity to observe the amount of logging data collected per hour before increasing the value. Select a value to ensure that the amount of log files collected will not fill up the /home partition. Note: The /home partition has a capacity of approximately 19GByte. The worst case expectation for a very heavily loaded AC is a maximum of 1Gb logging per hour. That is, 1Gb of compressed files. However, an AC is unlikely to approach this level of usage in practice and is even less likely to sustain this level of usage for extended periods.3.7.2 Taking Log Files Offline for Analysis It is recommended to analyse the log files offline. For more information about log file analysis, see [TRB_200]. Collect All Logs for Offline Analysis To take all currently available log files, take a log file backup with the backup utility, as described in section 7. Before doing this, first ensure the /home partition has sufficient free space to accommodate the backup. Typically, if a lot of space is used on /home, this will be usually used by the log files. As the backup makes a compressed tar file, this requires a lot of free working space. Use the df -h command to check free space. If the Use% column for the device mounted on /home is greater than 33%, it may not be practical to use the backup utility to collect the log files. Once the backup is complete, copy the backup archive to a remote computer. Once the archive has been safely copied, immediately delete the archive from the AC as the log file backup can be very large. Collect Some Logs for Offline Analysis To collect fewer files, create a tar file containing the required time span. For example, if it is between 3 and 4 in the afternoon, and the last hour or so of logs is required: # cd /var/log/<day> Where <day> is the current day of the month. # tar cvf last_hour_log.tar 14 15 Note: Do not use the z option to compress the tar file, as the log files are already compressed and this option will add to the CPU overhead for creating the file.3.7.3 Log File Analysis After unpacking the backup or manually created tar file on a remote computer, it is now possible to analyse the log files. Note: These instructions assume a Linux computer will be used, which has the necessary built-in commands.Oyster 3G AC Operations Manual Oyster 3G AC Operating BasicsOY3G_OPM_200 v7.0 for IPA1.0 © ip.access Limited 2011 Page 47
  • 55. To look for a given error message in a given hour’s worth of log files, do this: # cd <path_to_logs>/<day>/<hour> # zgrep ERROR_MESSAGE messages.* As each log file contains only one minute of logs, it may help to combine the log files for the required time span into a single file to make analysis easier. For example, to help trace a call that took place at about 11:30 on the 30th day of the month: # cd <path_to_logs>/30/11 # zcat messages.2* messages.3* > my_trace.log If a trace file spans over two hours, for example a call was made at 10:59 that lasted to 11:05, combine files like this: # cd <path_to_logs>/30/11 # zcat ../10/messages.5* messages.0* > my_trace.logOyster 3G AC Operations Manual Oyster 3G AC Operating BasicsOY3G_OPM_200 v7.0 for IPA1.0 © ip.access Limited 2011 Page 48
  • 56. 4 Oyster 3G AC Applications This section provides information about the Oyster 3G AC applications, including how the applications function within the elevated availability feature.4.1 AC Application Architecture Basics The cards in the first six slots of the AC chassis are single blade computers that run the core set of AC applications. In simplified terms, the application archtecture on each of the single blade computers can be summarised as follows: AC Applications Middleware Linux AC Hardware (ATCA-4300)4.1.1 Linux Linux is the operating system that provides the basic hardware management and services such as file system management and networking. Linux includes built-in commands that can be utilised when working with an AC, and these commands are used as needed. The AC uses a custom installation Wind River Linux, which is suited to real time applications.4.1.2 Middleware The middleware provides the AC with high availability functionality. This includes features such as distributed application management, inter-application communication, monitoring and mapping dependencies between software components. The middleware provides the clustering functionality that brings the six cards together as a high availability cluster, and determines which card from each redundant pair initially hosts the active applications and which hosts the standby applications. The AC middleware also provides the logging functionality that feeds into the log files in /var/log. The AC uses OpenClovis middleware. See section 4.7 for information about the middleware components used by an AC.Oyster 3G AC Operations Manual Oyster 3G AC ApplicationsOY3G_OPM_200 v7.0 for IPA1.0 © ip.access Limited 2011 Page 49
  • 57. 4.1.3 AC Applications The AC applications running on the Management, Stacks and Call Control Cards provide the 3G call processing and management capabilities. There are two cards of each type for redundancy, hence a total of six cards. The type of card is determined by its physical location in the AC chassis, and this in turn determines which applications run on the card, as in section 4.2. A handful of AC applications run outside the Management, Stacks and Call Control Card cluster. These are the applications running on the Iu+ interface cards. However, they are managed and monitored via a proxy on the Management Card. The AC applications do not process any user plane traffic. User plane traffic is routed directly between the AP (Iu+) and core network (Iu) interfaces.4.2 AC Application Distribution This section describes how the ip.access applications providing the core AC functionality are distributed across the AC cards. This reflects how the applications are listed in the main AC CLI (debug.sh). For information on the main AC CLI, see section 11.1. The AC applications running on each ATCA-4300 card are: Applications on the AC Card and Slot Applications Management Card MgmtModuleI0 Slot 1 (or 2) FaultManagerI0 AC_DBI0 MgmtProxyIAPI0 PlatformManagerI0 IapControllerI0 APControllerI0 MeasurementControllerI0 MgmtProxyATMI0 OmcrClientI0 Stacks Card SAALI0 Slot 3 (or 4) MgmtProxyStacksI0 RANAPI0 ALCAPI0 Mtp3B_SCCPI0 Call Control Card IuControllerI0 Slot 5 (or 6) TRUMI0 UPProxyI0 UMRI0 PagingI0 AdmissionControlI0 MgmtProxyControlI0 UECCCI0Oyster 3G AC Operations Manual Oyster 3G AC ApplicationsOY3G_OPM_200 v7.0 for IPA1.0 © ip.access Limited 2011 Page 50
  • 58. Notice that the application names all end with I0 for Instance 0 (zero). These are the applications on the first instance of each card. That is the cards in slots 1, 3 and 5. For the second instance of each card, the application names end with I1 for Instance 1. In addition, there is an additional layer of control for some applications via management proxies. In these cases, the application can run somewhere else, and the proxy provides an indirect point of contact with the application. The management proxies are summarised in the following table: Applications under Management Proxies on the AC Card and Slot Management Proxy Application Application Runs On Management Card MgmtProxyIAPI0 IapControllerAp Management Card Slot 1 (or 2) (or, for slot 2 MgmtProxyIAPI1) IapUserPlaneAp All run on Iu+ Interface Card (AMC-7211) IapMFAp IapMMAp MgmtProxyATMI0 iuCtlAp Call Control Card (or, for slot 2 MgmtProxyATMI1) saalAp Stacks Card Stacks Card MgmtProxyStacksI0 alcapAp All run on Stacks Card Slot 3 (or 4) (or, for slot 4 Mtp3bAp MgmtProxyStacksI1) RanapAp Call Control Card MgmtProxyControlI0 uecccAp All run on Call Control Slot 5 (or 6) (or, for slot 6 pgAp Card MgmtProxyControlI1) trumAp umrAp uppAp4.3 Management Card Applications4.3.1 MgmtModule The AC Management Module is the main controller module for OAM. It receives and decodes requests from the OMC-R Server via the OmcrClient, and returns responses. Requests are forwarded as appropriate either to the AP controller or to an AC component via internal services.4.3.2 FaultManager The Fault Manager provides a single point of contact for receiving alarms from other components. The Fault Manager converts alarms into the format used by the OmcrClient and then forwards them to the OmcrClient.4.3.3 AC_DB The AC database process, which interacts with other applications to serve as a repository for AC configuration information and data on the connected APs.Oyster 3G AC Operations Manual Oyster 3G AC ApplicationsOY3G_OPM_200 v7.0 for IPA1.0 © ip.access Limited 2011 Page 51
  • 59. 4.3.4 MgmtProxyIAP The management proxy for the applications terminating the Iu+ interface on the Iu+ interface cards, which are the AMC-7211s. This handles configuration, fault and performance management information only. The MgmtProxyIAP does not communicate directly with the applications on the Iu+ interface cards, but uses the IapController as an intermediary. The MgmtProxyIAP is also a proxy for IapController itself, for configuration, fault and performance management.4.3.5 PlatformManager The Platform Manager is responsible for monitoring and reporting the health of the AC platform. Some components can have configurable thresholds, such that when a certain threshold is passed an alarm is raised. Platform Manager is also responsible for automatically recovering unresponsive hardware.4.3.6 IapController The IapController is an intermediary between MgmtProxyIAP and the applications running on the Iu+ interface cards. It multiplexes/de-multiplexes the communications between the MgmtProxyIAP and applications running on the Iu+ interface cards.4.3.7 APController The AP Controller manages AP connections, including determining whether an AP is allowed to connect to the AC and monitoring the state of the AP connection. Once an AP is connected, the AP Controller provides OAM control for the AP.4.3.8 MeasurementController The Measurement Controller manages collection and reporting of data from performance management measurements within the AC.4.3.9 MgmtProxyATM This is the Iu Management Proxy that is responsible for configuration and provisioning of the SAAL application on the Stacks Card and the Iu Controller application on the Call Control Card. The interface between the Iu Management Proxy and Iu Controller supports configuring AAL5 PVCs and creating/deleting the PVCs at runtime. The interface between the Iu Management Proxy and SAAL allows configuration of the SAAL layer (SSCOP and SSCF-NNI) corresponding to signalling PVCs.4.3.10 OmcrClient The OmcrClient maintains the SOIP connection to the OMC-R Server managing the AC, and re-establishes the connection if it is lost. It also applies the limits calculated by the OMC-R Server for the rate of sending messages. The OmcrClient uses the SOIP interface to receive requests from the OMC-R Server and send notifications and alarms to the OMC-R Server. Alarms are reported according to the filtering rules. The OmcrClient also implements buffering of alarms and notifications for overload purposes and to provide alarm and notification replay.Oyster 3G AC Operations Manual Oyster 3G AC ApplicationsOY3G_OPM_200 v7.0 for IPA1.0 © ip.access Limited 2011 Page 52
  • 60. 4.4 Stacks Card Applications4.4.1 SAAL The SAAL application handles the SAAL layer (SSCOP and SSCF-NNI) in the MTP3b signalling stack. OAM is provided via the MgmtProxyATM running on the Management Card.4.4.2 MgmtProxyStacks This is the management proxy for the alcapAp, Mtp3bAp and RanapAp applications running on the Stacks Card.4.4.3 RANAP The RANAP application provides the signalling service between UTRAN or GERAN (in Iu mode) and the CN.4.4.4 ALCAP ALCAP is the generic name for transport signalling protocol used to set-up and tear down transport bearers. ALCAP signalling is used to create the user traffic channel over AAL2. TRUM interfaces with the ALCAP stack for session establishment and release. TRUM acts as the routing manager for the ALCAP stack. The routing manager functionality in ALCAP is required to implement the path allocation procedures.4.4.5 Mtp3B_SCCP The Mtp3B_SCCP application provides the capability to convey RANAP signalling messages over the Iu interface. SCCP provides capabilities to control logical signalling connections and to transfer signalling data units. MTP3b provides routing for the signalling messages.4.5 Call Control Card Applications4.5.1 IuController The Iu Controller application handles setup and configuration of the Iu/ATM interfaces, including AAL2 and AAL5 PVC creation at startup, setup/delete of AAL2 sessions and setup/delete of GTPU tunnels. OAM is provided via the MgmtProxyATM running on the Management Card. Iu Controller is also responsible for forwarding AAL2 channels and GTPu/AAL5 configuration messages, received from TRUM, down to the Iu Module.4.5.2 AdmissionControl The Admission Control application monitors AC loading and resource usage. Based on the AC load and resource usage, Admission Control will accept or deny requests for UE admission and RAB admission.4.5.3 MgmtProxyControl This is the management proxy for the uecccAp, pgAp, trumAp, umrAp and uppAp applications running on the Call Control Card.Oyster 3G AC Operations Manual Oyster 3G AC ApplicationsOY3G_OPM_200 v7.0 for IPA1.0 © ip.access Limited 2011 Page 53
  • 61. 4.5.4 UECCC The UE Call Control Coordination application is an intermediary between the core network and the APs. Typically this means that UECCC coordinates much of the RANAP message handling at the interface between Iu and Iu+. This includes any special handling of RANAP messages that is different in the Oyster 3G System, compared to conventional RANs, due to the architectural split between the AC and APs. In some cases, RANAP messages are terminated at the AC by UECCC. For example, a location report request from the core network is handled by UECCC, which uses the location of the AP to report the location of the requested UE. UECCC is also involved in procedures such as: • Iu connection establishment and release • RAB setup and release • NAS message transfer • Admission control, by interacting with the Admission Control application4.5.5 TRUM Transport Resource and User plane Manager (TRUM) performs the following functions: • Transport Resource Management - Allocation/de-allocation of Iu and Iu+ user resources in the AC. This includes the CS and PS resources. • User Plane configuration - Setting up of user plane entities to establish a RAB. TRUM is responsible for SRTP Sessions Management during CS and PS User Plane setup. TRUM sends any Create/Delete Session/Stream Request to the UP Proxy, which acts as a router. UP Proxy routes the message to the appropriate SRTP Session Manager. Communication between the UP Proxy and the SRTP Session Manager are over an internal SOIP link. TRUM provides an interface to UECCC for allocation and de-allocation of user plane resources, and also for resetting User plane resources. TRUM interfaces with Admission Control to admit or release a RAB when CS or PS resource allocation or de-allocation is requested from UECCC. TRUM provides an interface to ALCAP for blocking/unblocking a path. It also interfaces with ALCAP for establishment and release of AAL2 sessions.4.5.6 UPProxy The User Plane Proxy processes internal requests from TRUM for RTP Session creation and deletion, creates messages in the appropriate format and routes them to the corresponding RTP Session Manager. Hence, UPP provides communication between TRUM and the user plane application on each Iu+ interface card.4.5.7 UMR The URSL Message Router application has the following core functions: • Acts as a SOIP client for connecting with multiple MF modules. • Route the URSL messages received from Call Control applications (UECCC, TRUM or Paging) to the correct MF module(s).Oyster 3G AC Operations Manual Oyster 3G AC ApplicationsOY3G_OPM_200 v7.0 for IPA1.0 © ip.access Limited 2011 Page 54
  • 62. • Route the URSL messages received from the MF modules to the correct Call Control applications (UECCC, TRUM or Paging) based on the URSL message Id. • Inform the Call Control application (UECCC, TRUM or Paging) when a URSL stream with an AP becomes available or unavailable. Note: An instance of MF (Message Forwarder) runs on each Iu+ interface card.4.5.8 Paging The Paging application handles RANAP idle mode paging messages from the core network. The Paging application reduces unnecessary paging activity on the APs by only sending paging messages to APs that have a given UE in their access control lists.4.6 Iu+ Interface Card Applications4.6.1 IapUserPlaneAp This is the Iu+ user plane application, which handles user plane sessions from the APs.4.6.2 IapMFAp This is the Message Forwarder application that runs on the Iu+ interface card (AMC-7211). The Message Forwarder terminates the SOIP connections from the APs. SOIP streams from the APs are forwarded to the relevant AC applications, and vice versa.4.6.3 IapMMAp The IapMMAp is the Module Manager Application that connects to the AC Management Plane Application over the SOIP link. It terminates the Configuration Management interface for both the IapUserPlaneAp and IapMFAp. The interface specifies setup (creation/deletion) and configuration messages for Iu+/IP interfaces, SOIP Servers and RTP Servers. It also specifies Status Indication/State Change and Fault Management messages (Alarms).4.7 Middleware Components (OpenClovis) The main AC CLI also lists the middleware components running on each ATCA-4300 card. The components that run on all ATCA-4300 cards are: • cpm • gmsServer • nameServer • logServer • ckptServer • eventServer All of these, except cpm, are also given an instance that shows which card they are running on. The following instance identifiers are appended to the middleware component names: • ManagementCardI0 • ManagementCardI1 • StacksCardI0 • StacksCardI1Oyster 3G AC Operations Manual Oyster 3G AC ApplicationsOY3G_OPM_200 v7.0 for IPA1.0 © ip.access Limited 2011 Page 55
  • 63. • CallControlCardI0 • CallControlCardI1 For example, for the name server running on the slot 4 Stacks Card: • nameServer_StacksCardI14.7.1 cpm This is the Component Manager. The CPM is the part of the Availability Management Framework (AMF) that manages components according to the configured policy and also according to directions from the AMS. The AMS is the decision making part of the AMF, and makes decisions according to the description it has of hardware and software components, their interdependencies, rules for service grouping and so on.4.7.2 gmsServer This component provides the Group Membership Service. This is part of the high availability infrastructure, and provides the capability for a set of nodes to form a cluster. For an AC, the nodes are the ATCA-4300 cards, and together all six cards form a single cluster. A node that is a member of a cluster can then host high availability applications. A node can only be part of a cluster if it is both healthy and well connected to the cluster.4.7.3 nameServer The Name service is used to refer to objects and services by "friendly names". The objects and services that can be referenced by name are registered with the Name service. This means it is not necessary to know the specific Object Reference, such as a logical address resource ID, to use a registered object or service.4.7.4 logServer The Log service is used to record information about events. In an AC, this is the service that feeds information to the log files under /var/log.4.7.5 ckptServer This is the Checkpoint Service that allows run time synchronisation between active and standby components. This is part of the high availability infrastructure.4.7.6 eventServer The Event service is a communication mechanism for the components in the cluster. In the AC, this means all the components running over the OpenClovis middleware on the ATCA-4300 cards. The Event service uses an event channel concept, where a component publishes an event on a given channel, and subscribers to that channel can receive the events.Oyster 3G AC Operations Manual Oyster 3G AC ApplicationsOY3G_OPM_200 v7.0 for IPA1.0 © ip.access Limited 2011 Page 56
  • 64. 4.8 Elevated Availability and Automatic Application Restarts The current AC software uses redundant hardware and automatic application restarts to provide a degree of elevated availability. The goal of elevated availability is to minimise service interruptions by restarting AC applications and/or hardware components without operator intervention. This section describes how the AC applications use automatic restarts to provide elevated availability. If an application fails on the Management Card, Call Control Card or Stacks Card it will restart automatically. Depending on the application, the failure may or may not affect service, as follows: Software Runs On Effect of Failure Component Platform Manager Management No effect on other AC applications or existing services. Card AC_DB Management No effect on existing services. Other OAM components Card that are dependent on AC_DB will restart. ManagementModule Management Existing calls will be dropped due to losing all AP Card connections. APs will reconnect automatically. Also, the management connection to the OMC-R Server will be lost so the AC will show as disconnected in the OMC-R Client GUI. The BSMIS replay mechanism will resend alarms when the management connection to the OMC-R Server is reestablished. Measurement Management No effect on other AC applications or existing services. Controller Card Some AC measurements may be lost, where the counts were cached but did not output to a report. OmcrClient Management No effect on other AC applications or existing services. Card The management connection to the OMC-R Server will be lost so the AC will show as disconnected in the OMC-R Client GUI. The BSMIS replay mechanism will resend alarms when the management connection to the OMC-R Server is reestablished. MgmtProxyIAP Management Service interruption due to AC application restart as this is Card a critical component. All existing calls are dropped. MgmtProxyATM Management Service interruption due to AC application restart as this is Card a critical component. All existing calls are dropped. IapController Management No effect on other AC applications or existing services, Card but some alarms and/or performance measurements may be lost. APController Management Existing calls will be dropped due to losing all AP Card connections. APs will reconnect automatically. FaultManager Management No effect on other AC applications or existing services, Card but some alarms may be lost. SAAL Stacks Card Service interruption due to AC application restart as this is a critical component. All existing calls are dropped.Oyster 3G AC Operations Manual Oyster 3G AC ApplicationsOY3G_OPM_200 v7.0 for IPA1.0 © ip.access Limited 2011 Page 57
  • 65. Software Runs On Effect of Failure Component MgmtProxyStacks Stacks Card Service interruption due to AC application restart as this is a critical component. All existing calls are dropped. Mtp3B_SCCP Stacks Card Service interruption due to AC application restart as a failure in this application triggers a restart in a critical component. All existing calls are dropped. RANAP Stacks Card Service interruption due to AC application restart as a failure in this application triggers a restart in a critical component. All existing calls are dropped. ALCAP Stacks Card Service interruption due to AC application restart as a failure in this application triggers a restart in a critical component. All existing calls are dropped. IuController Call Control Service interruption due to AC application restart as this is Card a critical component. All existing calls are dropped. MgmtProxyControl Call Control Service interruption due to AC application restart as this is Card a critical component. All existing calls are dropped. UMR Call Control AC services are affected - all calls will be dropped. The Card service interruption is brief as only this application needs to restart. UPProxy Call Control Service interruption due to AC application restart as this is Card a critical component. All existing calls are dropped. AdmissionControl Call Control Existing AC services are NOT affected. Card New calls will not be admitted until the application restarts (a few seconds). TRUM Call Control Service interruption due to AC application restart as this is Card a critical component. All existing calls are dropped. Paging Call Control Existing AC services are NOT affected. Card Paging requests from the core network will fail until the application restarts (a few seconds). UECCC Call Control AC services are affected - all calls will be dropped. The Card service interruption is brief as only this application needs to restart. When an application fails that can be restarted, this will usually restart on the same card. However, in some circumstances, the standby application on the second card may take over.4.9 Manual Startup of AC Applications Generally, the AC applications will only need to be started manually if they have been stopped manually. This will be necessary when: • The AC is upgraded - after an upgrade, the Management Cards must be restarted on the new software, and usually the applications are then stopped to complete other upgrade activities before starting the applications in a controlled manner • There is a fault that can only be resolved by stopping the applications, taking some corrective measure(s) and then starting the applications in a controlled manner See section 3.6 for AC application start and stop procedures.Oyster 3G AC Operations Manual Oyster 3G AC ApplicationsOY3G_OPM_200 v7.0 for IPA1.0 © ip.access Limited 2011 Page 58
  • 66. 5 Oyster 3G AC Commands This section provides information about miscellaneous commands that can be executed on the Oyster 3G AC that have not been described elsewhere. While some useful Linux commands are included, this is not intended as a guide to using Linux itself.5.1 Management Card Commands This section provides information about various Management Card utilities that can be used for AC configuration. Where relevant, references are provided to other sections or other manuals for instructions on using a utility.5.1.1 AC Configurator Use the AC Configurator utility primarily to configure the XML files. Some other changes can be made with AC Configurator, such as the OMC-R server and the AC ID used to identify the AC to the OMC-R. For instructions on using AC Configurator, see the AC Configurator manual [OPM_205].5.1.2 Health Check Use the health check utility to perform various checks on AC operational status. These checks are a convenient alternative to performing longer command sequences. Usage: hc [ --ping ] [ --umr ] [ --summaryaps ] [ --accesspoints ] [ --cn ] [ --omcr ] [ --gtpstats] [ --aal2stats] [ --iustats ] [ --mtp3 ] [ --timestamp ] [ --aps ] [ --mgmt ] [ --versync ] [ --db ] [ --activestandbystatus ] [ --all ] [ --help ] [ --version ] Each time the hc command is executed, it first reports the current version, as in the following example: Release type is SR1.1.0 This is not shown in the usage examples that follow. Use the --help or --version option to display usage and the current version. Multiple options can be used together. For example: # hc --gtpstats --aal2stats --iustats However, the --all option overrides any indivual options on the command line. Hence, there is no need to enter any other options on the command line when using --all.Oyster 3G AC Operations Manual Oyster 3G AC CommandsOY3G_OPM_200 v7.0 for IPA1.0 © ip.access Limited 2011 Page 59
  • 67. Ping Check Use the --ping option to check accessibility of the AC hardware components across the backplane network. Command: # hc --ping The expected output from a healthy operational AC follows: Ping test on all active slots/cards Checking Card type Management Card - Slot 2 [192.168.16.2] : reachable Checking Card type Stacks Card - Slot 3 [192.168.16.3] : reachable Checking Card type Stacks Card - Slot 3 [192.168.16.4] : reachable Checking Card type Call Control Card - Slot 3 [192.168.16.5] : reachable Checking Card type Call Control Card - Slot 3 [192.168.16.6] : reachable Checking Card type SCM - Slot 7 [192.168.16.7] : reachable Checking Card type SCM - Slot 8 [192.168.16.8] : reachable Checking Card type Carrier Card - Slot 9 [192.168.16.9] : reachable Checking Card type Carrier Card - Slot 10 [192.168.16.10] : reachable Checking Card type iSPAN Slot 9 / Bay 1 [192.168.16.144] : reachable Checking Card type iSPAN Slot 9 / Bay 2 [192.168.16.148] : reachable Checking Card type iSPAN Slot 10 / Bay 1 [192.168.16.160] : reachable Checking Card type iSPAN Slot 10 / Bay 2 [192.168.16.164] : reachable Checking Card type Cavium Slot 9 [192.168.16.156] : reachable Checking Card type Cavium Slot 10 [192.168.16.172] : reachable If any component is reported as not reachable, this may require diagnostic and/or corrective action. UMR Status Use the --umr option to check the status of the signalling connection between UMR and each of the AMC-7211s (aka Cavium). Command: # hc --umr The following output is an example from a healthy operational AC: Checking Cavium Connectivity UMR-Cavium Connection 0 Status : UMR_SOIP_CONN_ACTIVE_STREAM_ACTIVE UMR-Cavium Connection 1 Status : UMR_SOIP_CONN_ACTIVE_STREAM_ACTIVE Summary of Connected APs Use the --summaryaps option to summarise state of APs currently connected to an AC. Command: # hc --summaryaps The following output is an example from a healthy operational AC: Checking Connected APs Number of APs connected : 14 AP Connection table =================== Total AP connection objects 14 Total APs connected to AC 14 Total APs operational 14Oyster 3G AC Operations Manual Oyster 3G AC CommandsOY3G_OPM_200 v7.0 for IPA1.0 © ip.access Limited 2011 Page 60
  • 68. Access Point Connection Status Use the --accesspoints option to only check the number state of APs currently connected to an AC. Command: # hc --accesspoints The following output is an example from a healthy operational AC: Checking Connected APs Number of APs connected : 14 Basic Core Network Connectivity Use the --cn option to check basic core network connectivity in each domain, CS and PS. Command: # hc --cn The following output is an example from a healthy operational AC: Checking Core Network Status Status of CS Domain : PEER_STATE_ACTIVE Status of PS Domain : PEER_STATE_ACTIVE OMC-R Server Connection Use the --omcr option to check the management connection to the OMC-R Server. Command: # hc --omcr The following output is an example from a healthy operational AC: Checking OMCR Connectivity OMCR Connection IP Address : 10.255.254.136 OMCR Connection Status : CONNECTED GTP Status Use the --gtpstats option to check the GTP connections to the SGSN. That is, the Iu-PS user plane connections. Command: # hc --gtpstats The following output is an example from a healthy operational AC: Collecting Gtpu Statistics Checking for stats on Optical Port 0 Checking for stats on Optical Port 1 No AAL5 PS PVCs configured (Could be the APS protected port) Checking for stats on Optical Port 0 VPI: 31 VCI: 300 PVC Id: 511 Tunnel Id Rx Frames Tx Frames Status 16 4206 3635 From GTPU - No Error/To GTPU - No Error 18 8522 11668 From GTPU - No Error/To GTPU - No Error Checking for stats on Optical Port 1 No AAL5 PS PVCs configured (Could be the APS protected port)Oyster 3G AC Operations Manual Oyster 3G AC CommandsOY3G_OPM_200 v7.0 for IPA1.0 © ip.access Limited 2011 Page 61
  • 69. Checking for stats on Optical Port 0 Checking for stats on Optical Port 1 No AAL5 PS PVCs configured (Could be the APS protected port) Checking for stats on Optical Port 0 VPI: 33 VCI: 301 PVC Id: 522 No GTPu tunnels are setup on this PVC Checking for stats on Optical Port 1 No AAL5 PS PVCs configured (Could be the APS protected port) AAL2 Status Use the --aal2stats option to check the AAL2 connections to the MSC and/or MGWs. That is, the Iu-CS user plane connections. Command: # hc --aal2stats The following output is a partial example from a healthy operational AC: Collecting AAL2 Statistics Checking for stats on Card 0, Optical Port 0 VPI: 10 VCI: 200 PVC Id: 502 Channel Id Rx Frames Tx Frames Status 254 18170 18135 T0 UDP -No Error/FROM UDP -No Error Checking for stats on Card 0, Optical Port 1 No AAL2 PVCs configured (Could be the APS protected port) Checking for stats on Card 1, Optical Port 0 No PVCs configured Checking for stats on Card 1, Optical Port 1 No AAL2 PVCs configured (Could be the APS protected port) Checking for stats on Card 2, Optical Port 0 VPI: 32 VCI: 228 PVC Id: 513 ATM PVC Status Use the --iustats option to check the status of ATM PVCs on the Iu interface. Command: # hc --iustats The following example output shows an error on one of the PVCs: Checking Iu Statistics Iu Stats for card 0 VPI VCI AAL Type PVC Type Rx Count Tx Count Status 4 300 AAL5 PS 0 0 No error on PVC 4 500 AAL5 Signal 112757 103161 No error on PVC 4 400 AAL5 Signal 38202 38211 No error on PVC 14 200 AAL2 CS 1350938 1350938 No error on PVC 14 210 AAL2 CS 1337154 1337154 No error on PVC 14 211 AAL2 CS 1329640 1329640 No error on PVC 14 212 AAL2 CS 1329436 1329436 CPS[1]/Unsupported CID[1]/ 14 213 AAL2 CS 1332116 1332116 No error on PVCOyster 3G AC Operations Manual Oyster 3G AC CommandsOY3G_OPM_200 v7.0 for IPA1.0 © ip.access Limited 2011 Page 62
  • 70. 14 220 AAL2 CS 1310802 1310802 No error on PVC 14 221 AAL2 CS 1316888 1316888 No error on PVC 14 227 AAL2 CS 1324531 1324531 No error on PVC 14 228 AAL2 CS 1341771 1341771 No error on PVC The last error may persist. Repeat the command to show the Rx and Tx counts changing. MTP3b Link Status Use the --mtp3 option to check the status of the device instances that represent the signalling links between the AC and core network. Command: # hc --mtp3 The following output is an example from a healthy operational AC: Checking Mtp3 Status DPC 0 is Accessible DPC 1 is Accessible Link 0 is Available Link 1 is Available Route 0 is Available Route 1 is Available Application Start Times Use the --timestamp option to check the start times of the AC applications. If the start time is on the current date, the time is displayed. Otherwise, the day is shown. Command: # hc --timestamp The following output is an example from a healthy operational AC: Checking running process information on active slots Process Status on Management Card 1 Process Id Process Name Start Time 27205 PlatformManager Sep08 27494 MgmtModule Sep08 27495 MeasurementController Sep08 27496 OmcrClient Sep08 27497 MgmtProxyIAP Sep08 27498 MgmtProxyATM Sep08 27528 APController Sep08 27529 FaultManager Sep08 27540 IapController Sep08 Process Status on Management Card 2 [192.168.16.2] Process Id Process Name Start Time 1097 MgmtModule Sep08 1098 MeasurementController Sep08 1099 OmcrClient Sep08 1102 PlatformManager Sep08 1103 MgmtProxyATM Sep08 1104 MgmtProxyIAP Sep08 1167 APController Sep08 1174 FaultManager Sep08 1225 IapController Sep08 Process Status on Stacks Card 1 [192.168.16.3]Oyster 3G AC Operations Manual Oyster 3G AC CommandsOY3G_OPM_200 v7.0 for IPA1.0 © ip.access Limited 2011 Page 63
  • 71. Process Id Process Name Start Time 15710 SAAL Sep08 15766 MgmtProxyStacks Sep08 15773 Mtp3B_SCCP Sep08 15779 RANAP Sep08 15780 ALCAP Sep08 Process Status on Stacks Card 2 [192.168.16.4] Process Id Process Name Start Time 21977 SAAL Sep08 21978 MgmtProxyStacks Sep08 22016 Mtp3B_SCCP Sep08 22022 RANAP Sep08 22023 ALCAP Sep08 Process Status on Call Control Card 1 [192.168.16.5] Process Id Process Name Start Time 1232 MgmtProxyControl Sep08 1238 UMR Sep08 1239 UPProxy Sep08 1254 AdmissionControl Sep08 1261 TRUM Sep08 1267 Paging Sep08 1268 UECCC Sep08 1347 IuController Sep08 Process Status on Call Control Card 2 [192.168.16.6] Process Id Process Name Start Time 32031 IuController Sep08 32032 MgmtProxyControl Sep08 32047 UMR Sep08 32048 UPProxy Sep08 32059 AdmissionControl Sep08 32065 TRUM Sep08 32071 Paging Sep08 32072 UECCC Sep08 APS Protection Status Use the --aps option to check the APS 1+1 status. If APS is not used, there will be no output. Command: # hc --aps The following output is an example of the first APS group from a healthy operational AC: APS Configuration and Status APS Group 0 APS Type : 1+1 Working Board Instance : 0 Working Board Port : 0 Protect Board Instance : 0 Protect Board Port : 1 Direction: Bidirectional Active Port : Working Port Status : APS group is operational (Configured)Oyster 3G AC Operations Manual Oyster 3G AC CommandsOY3G_OPM_200 v7.0 for IPA1.0 © ip.access Limited 2011 Page 64
  • 72. Management Proxy Status Use the --mgmt option to check the status of applications handled by management proxies. Command: # hc --mgmt The following output is an example from a healthy operational AC: Management Proxy Status Card Proxy Type Process State Management IAP IapControllerAp Configured Management IAP IapUserPlaneAp Configured Management IAP IapMFAp Configured Management IAP IapMMAp Configured Management IAP IapUserPlaneAp Configured Management IAP IapMFAp Configured Management IAP IapMMAp Configured Management ATM saalAp Configured Management ATM iuCtlAp Configured Stacks Stacks alcapAp Configured Stacks Stacks Mtp3bAp Configured Stacks Stacks RanapAp Configured Control Control uecccAp Configured Control Control pgAp Configured Control Control trumAp Configured Control Control umrAp Configured Control Control uppAp Configured AC Software Version Use the --versync option to check the AC software versions are properly synchronised. Command: # hc --versync The following output is an example from a healthy operational AC: Testing versions diskless cards Version on card 192.168.16.3 match version on MGMT card SR1.1.0-84.0 Patch_12.6 Version on card 192.168.16.5 match version on MGMT card SR1.1.0-84.0 Patch_12.6 AC Database Health Use the --db option to check the health of the AC database. Command: # hc --db The following output is an example from a healthy operational AC: Testing database objects Found 2164 rows in DB. DB is OK Active/Standy Status Use the --activestandbystatus option to check the active/standby status of the Management, Stacks and Call Control Cards. Command:Oyster 3G AC Operations Manual Oyster 3G AC CommandsOY3G_OPM_200 v7.0 for IPA1.0 © ip.access Limited 2011 Page 65
  • 73. # hc --activestandbystatus The following output is an example from a healthy operational AC: Printing the States of various cards: Card MgmtSUI0: ACTIVE Card MgmtSUI1: STANDBY Card StacksSUI0: ACTIVE Card StacksSUI1: STANDBY Card ControlSUI0: ACTIVE Card ControlSUI1: STANDBY All Health Checks Use the --all option to execute all the health checks. The health checks are executed sequentially. Command: # hc --all Note: To save this output, it may be desirable to redirect the output to a file which can be copied offline for analysis. For example: # hc --all > hc_dump.txt5.1.3 Log Getter Use the log getter utilitities to collect log files and other information that is useful for troubleshooting an issue that has recently occurred on an AC. There are two ways to use log getter: • Collect logs locally on the AC using the lg command • Collect logs from a remote Linux computer using the lg_get.sh command These utilities should only be used during AC troubleshooting procedures. Therefore, the full usage of these utilities, including when to use them, is described in [TRB_200].5.1.4 AMC Hardware Configuration Commands Use the utilities described in this section to configure the AMCs (Advanced Mezzanine Cards) installed in the Carrier Cards. Once an AC is installed, these utilities are usually only needed during an AC upgrade or if it is necessary to replace faulty hardware. For information about hardware replacement procedures, see 9 Hardware Replacement. iSPAN 3650 Configuration There is a single Management Card utility available for this, which can be used to check and/or upgrade the interworking software and boot firmware on the iSPAN 3650s. Checking an iSPAN 3650 will do the following: • Verify the iSPAN 3650 is contactable across the internal network • Report whether or not the interworking software on the iSPAN 3650 matches the version stored on the Management Card, which is part of the current AC build The basic usage to check a single iSPAN 3650s is: # ispan_upgrade -H <IP_address>Oyster 3G AC Operations Manual Oyster 3G AC CommandsOY3G_OPM_200 v7.0 for IPA1.0 © ip.access Limited 2011 Page 66
  • 74. Alternatively, to check all iSPAN 3650s at once: # ispan_upgrade -a The full set of options is: -a Check all iSPAN 3650s. -H <IP_address> Check one iSPAN 3650, as contacted via the internal <IP_address>, which is one of the following: • 192.168.16.144 • 192.168.16.148 • 192.168.16.160 • 192.168.16.164 -f <filename> Use the interworking software file specified by <filename>. This must be a file in /opt/tftpboot on the Management Card, with an SX*.bin file name. -b <filename> Use the boot firmware file specified by <filename>. This must be a file in /opt/tftpboot/iphwapto/tools on the Management Card, with an sx*.boo file name. -u Upgrade the iSPAN 3650 if there is a mismatch. -n No ping test prior to upgrade. This should only be used with the -u option. Generally, this will allow an iSPAN 3650 upgrade to proceed, even if the card does not appear to be responding. -c Check controllers. This shows which optical ports are in use on an iSPAN 3650. -h Help. Prints the usage for the command. When used to upgrade an iSPAN 3650, this can take over 20 minutes. Also, the iSPAN 3650s on one Carrier Card must be updated in series. However, the Carrier Cards can be updated in parallel. Hence, a full upgrade of all four iSPAN 3650s can take over 40 minutes. AMC-7211 Configuration There is a single Management Card utility available for this, which ensures that an AMC-7211 has the bootcmd environment variable set correctly in its boot configuration. To ensure all AMC-7211s are configured correctly, run this command: # cavium_setup -a To ensure all AMC-7211s are configured correctly, run this command: # cavium_setup -H <IP_address> Where <IP_address> is the internal IP address of the required AMC-7211. That is, either 192.168.16.156 or 192.168.16.172.5.1.5 Configure the AC Host Name Use the host name configuration utility to store a sequence of up to 18 characters in the SCM Shelf Manager configuration, which helps to identify the AC. The host name is used in the command prompt on the ATCA-4300 cards. This contrasts with the AC Unit ID, which is only used to identify the AC to the OMC-R.Oyster 3G AC Operations Manual Oyster 3G AC CommandsOY3G_OPM_200 v7.0 for IPA1.0 © ip.access Limited 2011 Page 67
  • 75. For example, the host name can be used to configure a CLLI address, which uses the following format: CLLI Format Field Characters Example Field Description City 4 NYCQ City where the AC is located State 2 NY State code Location 2 BR Location within the city Equipment Code 3+ AC2 Unique identifier for the AC at the specified location Set or Change the AC Host Name This is the main purpose of this utility. To set the host name, this procedure only needs to be executed once, from either Management Card. Also use this procedure to change the host name. 1) From one of the Management Cards, use the host naming utility to provide a new host name for the AC: # do_hostname -a set -h <hostname> Where <hostname> is a sequence of up to 18 characters. This can be any sequence of characters, including a CLLI address as described above. The new <hostname> will be used to identify the AC via the command prompts on the ATCA-4300 cards the next time they are rebooted. 2) Verify the new host name is set correctly: # do_hostname -a get This will produce output similar to the following, according to the host name entered above: =======================Shelf information======================== HEX: d3 4e 59 43 51 4e 59 41 43 43 52 39 46 30 31 0a 00 00 00 00 TEXT: NYCQNYACCR9F01 ================================================================ Note: If the hostname was ever saved for rollback on the AC, this command will also show the rollback information. Command Line Options The full set of command line options are: -a <ACTION> [-f] [-h <new_AC_hostname>] If the -a (for action) option is used, there are several sub-options, as below. The -h for help option simply prints a usage message. If using the -a option then: • <ACTION> is one of the following: • get - display the current host name and, if it has been saved, the rollback host nameOyster 3G AC Operations Manual Oyster 3G AC CommandsOY3G_OPM_200 v7.0 for IPA1.0 © ip.access Limited 2011 Page 68
  • 76. • set - use the specified <new_AC_hostname> as the new host name, the -h option must also be used • save - save the current host name in case it is needed for rollback • rollback - go back to the host name previously saved for rollback • -f will suppress confirmation prompts • -h <new_AC_hostname> must be provided if the set action is used5.1.6 Boot Switching The boot switching utility is used to select which set of partitions on the hard disk that a Management Card will boot from at the next bootup. Generally, this boot switching utility is only used during upgrades, to configure a Management Card to start from the new software build when it is rebooted. It may also be used as part of a rollback procedure, to switch back to the partition set containing the old software build. To execute the boot switching utility, run this command: # select_boot.sh This will result in some output similar to the following, which requires a y or n response: The active SR is SR1.1.0-83.0 (sda2) The alternative SR is SR1.1.0-83.0 (sda3) On the next reboot the boot device will be sda2 Do you want to change it to sda3 ? <y|n> [n] For a new AC, the active and alternative software versions will be the same, as in the example. As a general rule, only use this command as directed during upgrade or rollback procedures.5.1.7 Field Mode and Lab Mode Selection Each time the AC database is updated, the lab_or_field_mode script must be executed to set the AC for use in the field or a laboratory. Also, each time this is changed, the AC applications must be restarted for this change to take effect. Field mode is the default state. To set Field mode: # lab_or_field_mode field To set Lab mode: # lab_or_field_mode lab Effects of choosing Field mode: • The AC will accept AP connections up to the limit set by the ApController MIB attribute maxApConnections. • All notifications, that is OCNs, ODNs and AVCNs, relating to AP and AP Connection objects are suppressed, except as in the next point. This means that AP Connection and AP objects do NOT appear on the OMC-R.Oyster 3G AC Operations Manual Oyster 3G AC CommandsOY3G_OPM_200 v7.0 for IPA1.0 © ip.access Limited 2011 Page 69
  • 77. • An individual AP can be retrieved in the OMC-R Client. This only lasts for the current OMC-R Client session, but the same APs can be re-retrieved in subsequent sessions via shortcuts created automatically in the OMC-R Client. This is possible until an AP is removed from the retrieval list by the user. Each OMC-R Client user can retrieve a limited number of APs each. Effects of choosing Lab mode: • The AC will limit the number of AP connections to 3000, or to the limit set by maxApConnections, whichever is the lower. If an AC is restarted in Lab test mode having previously been in Deployed mode with maxApConnections set greater than 3000, the maxApConnections value will be autonomously reset to 3000. However, no existing (persisted) AP Connection objects will be deleted. • The AC will block attempts to set maxApConnections to a value higher than 3000. • All notifications relating to AP and AP connection objects are handled normally, so that all of these objects are visible at the OMCR. Note: The limit of 3000 APs is intended to protect the OMC-R from becoming overloaded. This means that the limit of 3000 AP connections is actually shared by all the ACs connected to the same OMC-R. If there are multiple ACs in lab mode connected to an OMC-R, edit the maxApConnections value for each AC in lab mode so that the total is 3000 or less. Note: This does not affect the handling of alarms, which are subject to separate filtering controls. Note: For information about AC capacity and performance, and how this affects the number of AP connections, see [GST_200].5.1.8 Power Sequence Configuration There are two commands that change the order that the cards are powered up when the AC is switched on from powered-down state. Use the following command to set the correct power up sequence for IPA1.0 and later: # set_power_sequence Use the following command only if it is necessary to roll back to IPA0.6.1: # unset_power_sequence These commands can be executed at any time. The changes applied by these commands only take effect when the chassis is powered down and then powered on again.Oyster 3G AC Operations Manual Oyster 3G AC CommandsOY3G_OPM_200 v7.0 for IPA1.0 © ip.access Limited 2011 Page 70
  • 78. 5.2 SCM Commands5.2.1 Resource IDs for HPI Commands Refer to the following table for resource IDs to use in the HPI utility: Card Resource ID Slot 1 Management Card 0x1009a Slot 2 Management Card 0x20096 Slot 3 Stacks Card 0x30092 Slot 4 Stacks Card 0x4008e Slot 5 Call Control Card 0x5008a Slot 6 Call Control Card 0x60086 Slot 7 SCM 0x70082 Slot 8 SCM 0x80084 Slot 9 Carrier Card 0x90088 Slot 10 Carrier Card 0xa008c Slot 9 Bay 1 Iu/ATM Interface Card (iSPAN 3650) 0x50788 Slot 9 Bay 2 Iu/ATM Interface Card (iSPAN 3650) 0x60788 Slot 9 Bay 4 Iu+ Ethernet Interface Card (AMC-7211) 0x80788 Slot 10 Bay 1 Iu/ATM Interface Card (iSPAN 3650) 0x5078c Slot 10 Bay 2 Iu/ATM Interface Card (iSPAN 3650) 0x6078c Slot 10 Bay 4 Iu+ Ethernet Interface Card (AMC-7211) 0x8078c5.2.2 Powercycle with HPI The HPI utility on the SCM can be used to powecycle a card. This may be necessary if a card is otherwise unresponsive. This procedure should be avoided if the AC applications are running. This is to avoid conflicts with Platform Manager’s attempts to reactivate an unresponsive card. Also, this should only be done in a maintenance window as this may be service affecting. 1) From a Management Card, start a telnet session on the active SCM: # telnet 192.168.16.17 2) Login as root. 3) Run the hpi utility: # hpiapp 4) Select Cnfg Mgmt Commands: Cmd> m 5) Select saHpiResourcePowerStateSet:Oyster 3G AC Operations Manual Oyster 3G AC CommandsOY3G_OPM_200 v7.0 for IPA1.0 © ip.access Limited 2011 Page 71
  • 79. HotSwap Cmd> 5 6) At the promt to enter the Resource ID, enter the correct resource ID from the table in section 5.2.1. For example, to powercycle the Carrier Card in Slot 10: Enter Resource ID [0x0]: 0xa008c 7) Powercycle the selected card by typing 2: Select [0]: 2 Note: If this is done for the active SCM while the AC applications are running, the applications will restart due to the network switch failover between the SCMs. Also, the telnet session may disconnect and display the following message: Connection closed by foreign host. 8) To exit the hpiapp utility, type q until the SCM command prompt reappears. 9) Return to the Management Card: # exit 10) Wait at least 5 minutes for a card to reboot before taking any other actions.5.2.3 Extract and Insert with HPI The HPI utility on the SCM can be used to stop and start a card using Hot Swap commands. This may be necessary if a card is otherwise unresponsive. These procedures must not be used if the AC applications are running. This is to avoid conflicts with Platform Manager’s attempts to reactivate an unresponsive card. Also, as it is necessary to stop the AC applications, this should only be done in a maintenance window as this is service affecting. Deactivate an ATCA Card or AMC This must not be done if the AC applications are running. This may put a card into a state where it can only be recovered by physically extracting and reinserting the card. 1) From a Management Card, start a telnet session on the active SCM: # telnet 192.168.16.17 2) Login as root. 3) Run the hpi utility: # hpiapp 4) Select HotSwap Commands: Cmd> h 5) Select HotSwapActionRequest:Oyster 3G AC Operations Manual Oyster 3G AC CommandsOY3G_OPM_200 v7.0 for IPA1.0 © ip.access Limited 2011 Page 72
  • 80. HotSwap Cmd> 9 6) At the promt to enter the Resource ID, enter the correct resource ID from the table in section 5.2.1. For example, to hot swap the SCM in Slot 8: Enter Resource ID [0x0]: 0x80084 Note: This is given as an example, as the Slot 8 SCM must be de-activated when it is necessary to recommission a Carrier Card. 7) Select Action Extraction by typing 1: Select [0]: 1 Note: If this is done for the active SCM while the AC applications are running, the applications will restart due to the network switch failover between the SCMs. Also, the telnet session may disconnect and display the following message: Connection closed by foreign host. 8) To exit the hpiapp utility, type q until the SCM command prompt reappears. 9) Return to the Management Card: # exit 10) Wait at least two minutes for a card to complete its extraction procedure before taking any other actions. Reactivate an ATCA Card or AMC This must not be done if the AC applications are running. This may put a card into a state where it can only be recovered by physically extracting and reinserting the card. 1) From a Management Card, start a telnet session on the active SCM: # telnet 192.168.16.17 2) Login as root. 3) Run the hpi utility: # hpiapp 4) Select HotSwap Commands: Cmd> h 5) Select HotSwapActionRequest: HotSwap Cmd> 9 6) At the promt to enter the Resource ID, enter the correct resource ID from the table in section 5.2.1. For example, to re-instert the SCM in Slot 8:Oyster 3G AC Operations Manual Oyster 3G AC CommandsOY3G_OPM_200 v7.0 for IPA1.0 © ip.access Limited 2011 Page 73
  • 81. Enter Resource ID [0x0]: 0x80084 Note: This is given as an example, as the Slot 8 SCM must be de-activated when it is necessary to recommission a Carrier Card. 7) Select the insertion action: Select [0]: 0 8) To exit the hpiapp utility, type q until the SCM command prompt reappears. 9) Return to the Management Card: # exit 10) Wait two minutes for the card to complete the insertion procedure before taking any other actions.Oyster 3G AC Operations Manual Oyster 3G AC CommandsOY3G_OPM_200 v7.0 for IPA1.0 © ip.access Limited 2011 Page 74
  • 82. 6 Oyster 3G AC Management from the OMC-R This section provides information on managing an AC from the OMC-R Client. For information on configuring an AC from the OMC-R Client see [OPM_220]. For general information on alarm management from the OMC-R Client see [OPM_410].6.1 Oyster 3G AC Information in the OMC-R Client Once there is a management connection between the AC and OMC-R, use the OMC-R Client to obtain information about the AC. This includes: • Checking key attributes • Finding general information, such as the software and MIB version used by the AC • Inspecting AC alarms6.1.1 Check Key AC Attributes Use the OMC-R to confirm the following attributes have been set correctly in the 3G AC Package for the 3G AC object: • MCC • MNC • RNC ID6.1.2 General Information An AC and its functionality are represented by the objects within the 3G AC Connection object. The first object in the AC hierarchy within the 3G AC Connection object is the RNS (Radio Network System). The RNS contains the AC specific objects that reflect aspects of the AC’s functionality, interfaces and hardware. This includes the AC’s 3G AP Controller, which contains any 3G AP Connection objects. Browse the objects, and their packages and attributes, to find out more information. For a full description of the status of objects in the OMC-R Client, see [OPM_410].Oyster 3G AC Operations Manual Oyster 3G AC Management from the OMC-ROY3G_OPM_200 v7.0 for IPA1.0 © ip.access Limited 2011 Page 75
  • 83. Software and MIB Version The software and MIB versions used by the AC are shown in the CO Service Package for the RNS object. The software version is a combination of the ip.access internal system release (e.g. SR1.0.2) and the AC software build number (e.g. 49.13). Connected APs The current number of connected APs is shown in the 3G AP Controller Package for the 3G AP Controller object. This shows both the number of AP children and the number of APs that are currently connected.6.2 AC Alarms One of the main functions of the OMC-R Client is fault management. Use the fault management features in the OMC-R Client to manage alarms raised by AC compontents. Some components also have configurable alarm thresholds.6.2.1 Finding and Managing Alarms for an AC There are two main ways to see the alarms for a particular AC: • In the full alarm list, look for alarms where the Source has the same number as the Service Identifier used by the required AC. If preferred, sort the list by Source to group the alarms into a single block. • Right-click the 3G AC Connection object and select Show Alarms for Object and its Children. This will create an Alarm View under Fault Management for all the objects for the AC, including any alarms reported by APs connected to the AC.Oyster 3G AC Operations Manual Oyster 3G AC Management from the OMC-ROY3G_OPM_200 v7.0 for IPA1.0 © ip.access Limited 2011 Page 76
  • 84. Once an alarm has been selected, it can be managed. Fault management actions in the OMC-R Client include acknowledging alarms, writing comments about alarms and deleting alarms. For a full description of fault management in the OMC-R Client, see [OPM_410]. For a complete list of alarms that can be raised on an AC object, and hence be seen in the OMC-R Client, see [REF_130].6.2.2 Alarm Thresholds Some of the AC components have configurable alarm thresholds. These can be adjusted from within the OMC-R Client to suit local requirements. Examples of AC components and their adjustable thresholds are: • AC File System - free space remaining • CPU Core - percent usage AC File System Alarm Thresholds Raise an alarm when the percentage of free space remaining on the file system drops below the configured value. There are two configurable levels for minor and major alarms. Typical values are 20% for minor and 10% for major. The AC File System objects are found under the Management Card objects for an AC. There is one AC File System object for each file system mounted on the Management Card for normal operation. CPU Core Alarm Thresholds Raise an alarm when the percentage of CPU usage rises above the configured value. There are two configurable levels for minor and major alarms. There are CPU Core objects within the CPU object for each of the Management, Stacks and Call Control Cards. Change an Alarm Threshold 1) Login to an OMC-R Client session with a user name that has full access rights to the AC. 2) In the Explorer pane, select the required object for the AC. For example, to select a CPU Core for a Stacks Card: 3G AC Connection > RNS > 3G AC > Full Shelf > ATCA Slot > Stacks Card > CPU > CPU Core Note: This is a general example only, which is not specific to a particular Stacks Card or CPU.Oyster 3G AC Operations Manual Oyster 3G AC Management from the OMC-ROY3G_OPM_200 v7.0 for IPA1.0 © ip.access Limited 2011 Page 77
  • 85. 3) Select the <component> Package, where <component> is the type of component object. The following example shows this package for a CPU Core object: 4) Click in the Value for a Threshold attribute and enter the required value. Click Apply to save the changes. Note: An alarm will be raised immediately if the current state of the component is over the new threshold value entered.Oyster 3G AC Operations Manual Oyster 3G AC Management from the OMC-ROY3G_OPM_200 v7.0 for IPA1.0 © ip.access Limited 2011 Page 78
  • 86. 7 Backup and Restore This section describes how to use the AC backup and restore utility. For information on how to save and load AC attributes from within the OMC-R Client, see [OPM_410].7.1 AC Backup Overview This feature allows a backup to be taken directly on the AC. By default, this backup is configured to execute automatically at 2:00am each day. The automatic backup must be enabled, as described in section 7.2. Additional backups can be taken manually as needed. In particular, it is recommended to take a backup immediately prior to starting an AC upgrade, and then again once the AC has been upgraded successfully. A backup archive can contain: • Configuration files • Logs • The AC database Backup archive files are stored in: /home/backup Each archive is named as follows: ac_bkp_<Card_ID>__<ver>__<date>_<time>_<contents>.tar.gz Where: • <Card_ID> is the Management Card identity, as it appears in the command line prompt. For example, AC-5-1. • <ver> is the ip.access build designation, comprising the ip.access internal system release and the AC build number • <date> is a date of the form YYYY_MM_DD • <time> is a time of the form HH_MM • <contents> is one or more of the following, according to the choices made for the backup: • CFG for configuration files • LOGS for log files • DB for the AC database An example file name for a complete backup could be: ac_bkp_AC-5-1__SR1.1.0-72.0__2010_03_04_16_21_CFG_LOGS_DB.tar.gz7.1.1 Backup Scenarios Configuration Backups It is recommended to take a configuration and database backup in the following scenarios: • Immediately prior to an AC upgradeOyster 3G AC Operations Manual Backup and RestoreOY3G_OPM_200 v7.0 for IPA1.0 © ip.access Limited 2011 Page 79
  • 87. • Immediately after an AC upgrade • Immediately prior to making any AC configuration changes • Immediately after making any AC configuration changes As the primary purpose of these backups is to conserve the configuration of the AC, it should not be necessary to include the log files for any of these scenarios. In addition, the backup archive file will be very small compared to an archive that includes the log files. Diagnostic Backups Take a diagnostic backup whenever the configuration, database and log files are needed to analyse the behaviour of the AC. This should only be needed on an occasional basis, on demand.7.2 Automatic Backup By default, for a newly installed AC, the automatic backup is disabled. If this is required, it must be enabled. It is recommended to enable the automatic backup. The default configuration for an automatic backup saves a backup archive of the AC configuration files and AC database in the /home/backup directory. It is strongly recommended to only include the AC configuration files and/or AC database in an automatic backup. Do not include the log files in any automated backup as this will significantly extend the CPU load each time the backup is executed, and will also create large files that can rapidly fill up the /home partition.7.2.1 Enable the Default Automatic Backup When this is enabled, this should be done on both Management Cards. 1) Log into the Management Card as ac_installer, and enter the password when prompted. 2) Run the following command: # crontab -e 3) Enter the ac_installer password at the password prompt. The text editor vi will open, showing the crontab configuration entry for the backup: 0 2 * * * /usr/bin/nice -17 sudo /usr/local/bin/ac_backup -m 0 -c -d 4) Make any change to the line in the file. Typically, change the backup time to 1 minute after 2am by changing the minutes setting as follows: 1 2 * * * /usr/bin/nice -17 sudo /usr/local/bin/ac_backup -m 0 -c -d 5) Save and close the file (:wq!). The backup is now enabled. To verify the backup is taking place, check the contents of the /home/backup directory on the following day, to ensure a backup file has been created within a few minutes of the configured time.Oyster 3G AC Operations Manual Backup and RestoreOY3G_OPM_200 v7.0 for IPA1.0 © ip.access Limited 2011 Page 80
  • 88. 7.2.2 Modify Automatic Backups This section describes some of the changes that could be made to the automatic backup schedule, including how to make weekly or monthly backups. All such changes are optional. When already making daily backups, weekly and/or monthly backups are not strictly necessary. However, these may be useful if the additional backups are going to be automatically saved to a remote host. The same changes should be made on both Management Cards. 1) Log into the Management Card as ac_installer, and enter the password when prompted. 2) Run the following command: # crontab -e 3) Enter the ac_installer password at the password prompt. The text editor vi will open, showing the current crontab configuration. For example: 1 2 * * * /usr/bin/nice -17 sudo /usr/local/bin/ac_backup -m 0 -c -d The first five items in the crontab entry specify, in order: • Minute of the hour, from 0 to 59 • Hour of the day, from 0 to 23 • Day of the month, from 1 to 31 • Month of the year, from 1 to 12 • Day of the week, from 0 (Sunday) to 6 (Saturday) A * character in any position means "all". Hence, the default configuration: 0 2 * * * <command> Means 0 minutes past 2, on any day. 4) To change the time of day of the existing backup, simply change the minute and/or hour value. 5) To add a weekly backup, first copy and paste the existing line. Then change the minute and hour value so the new backup does not clash with the daily backup, and also set a value for the fifth item for the required day. For example: 1 3 * * 0 /usr/bin/nice -17 sudo /usr/local/bin/ac_backup -m 0 -c -d This will create a backup at 1 minute past 3 every Sunday. 6) To add a monthly backup, first copy and paste the existing line. Then change the minute and hour value so the new backup does not clash with the daily backup, and also set a value for the fifth item for the required day. For example:Oyster 3G AC Operations Manual Backup and RestoreOY3G_OPM_200 v7.0 for IPA1.0 © ip.access Limited 2011 Page 81
  • 89. 1 4 20 * * /usr/bin/nice -17 sudo /usr/local/bin/ac_backup -m 0 -c -d This will create a backup at 1 minute past 4 on the 20th of every month. 7) An automated backup can be automatically copied to a remote host, by extending the command line to include the remote host options. For example: 1 3 * * 0 /usr/bin/nice -17 sudo /usr/local/bin/ac_backup -m 0 -c -d -h somehost.net This will create a backup at 1 minute past 3 every Sunday, which is then transferred to the computer somehost.net. See section 7.5 for more information about the backup command line. Note: As this is an automated transfer without user intervention, it will be necessary to use ssh key exchange in advance so that the ac_installer user name can login to the remote computer without needing to enter a password. This will also need to be redone each time the AC is upgraded. However, first ensure this is acceptable under the security policy for the network the Management Cards are connected to. Further information about key exchange is outside the scope of this manual. 8) Save and close the file (:wq!).7.2.3 Disable Automatic Backups The same changes should be made on both Management Cards. 1) Log into the Management Card as ac_installer, and enter the password when prompted. 2) Run the following command: # crontab -e 3) Enter the ac_installer password at the password prompt. The text editor vi will open, showing the current crontab configuration. For example: 1 2 * * * /usr/bin/nice -17 sudo /usr/local/bin/ac_backup -m 0 -c -d 4) Insert the # symbol at the beginning of any backup lines that should be disabled. For example: # 1 2 * * * /usr/bin/nice -17 sudo /usr/local/bin/ac_backup -m 0 -c -d If the # symbol is inserted at the beginning of all lines in the file, this will completely disable any automatic backups. 5) Save and close the file (:wq!).7.3 Run the Backup Utility 1) Determine the primary Management Card, as in section 3.6.1.Oyster 3G AC Operations Manual Backup and RestoreOY3G_OPM_200 v7.0 for IPA1.0 © ip.access Limited 2011 Page 82
  • 90. 2) Log into the active Management Card as ac_installer, and enter the password when prompted. 3) Run the backup utility: # sudo ac_backup -m 1 The backup utility menu will be displayed (showing the actual AC version in place of <ver>): Backup Menu for the AC <ver> 1) Backup 2) Restore 3) Purge 4) List 5) Copy the backup image to the remote site 6) Copy the backup image from the remote site 7) Exit Option: 4) Type the number for the required option, and press <Enter>. On completion of each activity, this menu will be displayed again. 5) To quit the utility, type 7 then <Enter>. 6) Logout from the ac_installer session: # exit7.4 Backup The following procedure explains how to make a regular backup of the AC configuration. In this example procedure, it is assumed that the AC configuration and database files will be backed up, and log files are optional. If needed, use the utility to backup only the log files in a single consolidated file for transfer to a diagnostics workstation. Note: There is no need to stop the AC applications to make a backup. However, it is recommended to do this when call activity is low, to minimise operational impact. 1) Determine the primary Management Card, as in section 3.6.1. 2) Login as ac_installer on the active Management Card and run the backup utility. # sudo ac_backup -m 1 3) Type 1 and press <Enter>. A prompt to backup the configuration will appear: Backup configuration? <y|n> : 4) Type y and press <Enter>. A prompt to backup the logs will appear: Backup logs? <y|n> :Oyster 3G AC Operations Manual Backup and RestoreOY3G_OPM_200 v7.0 for IPA1.0 © ip.access Limited 2011 Page 83
  • 91. Note: The log files will take up the most space in the backup archive. For a diagnostic backup, always backup the log files. For a regular backup taken to preserve the AC configuration, this is optional. 5) Type y or n as required and press <Enter>. A prompt to backup the database will appear: Backup DB? <y|n> : 6) Type y and press <Enter>. A prompt for the backup destination will appear: Destination </home/backup> : The default is /home/backup. This is reset each time the backup option is used. 7) To accept the default, just press <Enter>. Alternatively, specify the path to a directory that is known to exist and press <Enter>. Note: Any backup archives saved outside the /home/backup directory cannot be listed or managed with the backup utility. 8) The choices selected at each prompt are still visible. A prompt to continue with the backup, change options or quit will appear: Backup configuration? <y|n> : y Backup logs? <y|n> : n Backup DB? <y|n> : y Destination </home/backup> : 1) Backup, 2) Edit options, 3) Quit(any key) : 9) Type 1 and press <Enter>. Messages about the backup activity will be shown: Creating archive /home/backup/ac_bkp_AC-5-1__SR1.1.0-72.0__2010_04_04_16_21 _CFG_DB.tar ....Done Compressing archive /home/backup/ac_bkp_AC-5-1__SR1.1.0-72.0__2010_04_04_16_21 _CFG_DB.tar.gz ...Done Note: If the log files are included in the backup on an operational AC, a message may appear that the current log file is in use. This may be safely ignored. 10) When the backup is complete, the main menu will be re-displayed. Exit the backup utility and logout.7.5 Command Line Backup It is also possible to make a backup from the command line, without using the menu system. In this case, the -c, -l and -d options specify that the configuration, log files and/or AC database will be backed up, respectively. To make a complete backup to /home/backup, use the following command line while logged in as ac_installer:Oyster 3G AC Operations Manual Backup and RestoreOY3G_OPM_200 v7.0 for IPA1.0 © ip.access Limited 2011 Page 84
  • 92. # sudo ac_backup -m 0 -c -l -d To make a complete backup to a remote host computer, first setup ssh for password free connection to the remote host using public keys. Once this has been done, use the following command line while logged in as ac_installer: # sudo ac_backup -m 0 -c -l -d -h <host> Replace <host> with the IP address or hostname of the computer. In this case, the current user name (ac_installer) will be used to log in to the remote host, and the backup file will be stored in the user’s home directory. Use these additional options to change the user and/or target directory: -u <user> -r <remote_dir> When specifying a remote directory, the user on the remote host must have write permission to the directory.7.6 Restore A restore must only take place: • On an AC that has the exact same build standard as the AC from which the backup was taken • When the AC applications are not running The restore procedure described here assumes that the archive that will be restored contains both configuration and database backups. That is, the file name includes the CFG and DB indicators. This is the recommended restore scenario. However, it is also possible to restore a configuration-only backup. If restoring a CFG-only backup, it will be necessary to apply the configuration after the restore using the updateDb.sh utility, which will also restart the applications. For this procedure see [OPM_220].7.6.1 Restore From a Backup Archive 1) Determine the primary Management Card, as in section 3.6.1. 2) Login as ac_installer on the primary Management Card and stop the AC applications: # sudo /etc/init.d/app-reset stop 3) Wait 5 minutes to allow the AC applications to stop. 4) Start the sisp processes to ensure mysql is running. This is to allow database access: # sudo service sisp start 5) Run the backup utility. # ac_backup -m 1 6) Type 3 and press <Enter>. A numbered list of backup archives will be shown, with a prompt asking which archive should be restored:Oyster 3G AC Operations Manual Backup and RestoreOY3G_OPM_200 v7.0 for IPA1.0 © ip.access Limited 2011 Page 85
  • 93. 1) ac_bkp_AC-5-1__SR1.1.0-67.0__2010_02_03_16_28_CFG_LOGS_DB.tar.gz 2) ac_bkp_AC-5-1__SR1.1.0-67.0__2010_02_04_16_21_CFG_LOGS_DB.tar.gz 3) Exit Choose the backup to restore: 7) Restoration of the file will proceed and then the main menu will reappear. 8) Exit the backup utility. 9) Restart the AC applications: # su - root Enter the root password when prompted. # /etc/init.d/app-reset restart # exit 10) Allow the applications to start up then verify that the AC can provide service.7.7 Manage Archives The options to manage archives can be used to show the current list of backup archives, move backup archives between the AC and remote servers, and delete unwanted archives. Hence, also use these options to manage the amount of disk space used for storing the archive files.7.7.1 Disk Usage by Backup Archives As a general rule, most backups should be configuration and database backups. These backups are relatively small, and should not impact usage of the home partition where the backup archives are stored. However, a backup archive can be much larger when the log files are included. As backups that include log files are usually only needed for diagnostic purposes, a backup archive containing log files should be removed from the AC as soon as possible after it has been copied off the AC. Hence, when checking disk usage by the backup archives, if the archives appear to be taking up a lot of space then first check to see if there are any archives that include log files. Run the backup utility and use the List Archives option to see if there are any archives with LOGS in the name. If so, delete these archives then check disk usage again.7.7.2 List Archives 1) If not already in the backup utility, login as ac_installer on the active Management Card and run the backup utility. # ac_backup -m 1 2) Type 4 and press <Enter>. A list of backup archives will be shown, then the main menu will be shown again. 3) If no other actions are required, exit the backup utility and logout.Oyster 3G AC Operations Manual Backup and RestoreOY3G_OPM_200 v7.0 for IPA1.0 © ip.access Limited 2011 Page 86
  • 94. 7.7.3 Delete a Backup Archive 1) If not already in the backup utility, login as ac_installer on the active Management Card and run the backup utility. # ac_backup -m 1 2) Type 3 and press <Enter>. A numbered list of backup archives will be shown, with a prompt asking which archive should be deleted: 1) ac_bkp_AC-5-1__SR1.1.0-67.0__2010_02_03_16_28_CFG_LOGS_DB.tar.gz 2) ac_bkp_AC-5-1__SR1.1.0-67.0__2010_02_04_16_21_CFG_LOGS_DB.tar.gz 3) Exit Choose the backup to delete: 3) Type the required number and press <Enter>. A prompt will show the file name and ask for confirmation. For example: rm: remove regular file `ac_bkp_AC-5-1__SR1.1.0-67.0__2010_02_04_16_21_CFG_LOGS_DB.tar.gz? 4) Type y and press <Enter>. Removal of the file will be confirmed, and the delete prompt will appear again: removed `ac_bkp_AC-5-1__SR1.1.0-67.0__2010_02_04_16_21_CFG_LOGS_DB .tar.gz Choose the backup to delete: 5) Enter a different number to delete another archive, and confirm. Repeat as needed. Note: The list of archives will not be renumbered until the purge option is reselected from the main menu. Choosing the number of an archive that has already been deleted will have no effect. 6) When all the required archives have been deleted, type the number assigned to the Exit option and press <Enter>. The main menu will appear. 7) If no other actions are required, exit the backup utility and logout.7.7.4 Copy Archive to a Remote Server Use this option to copy a backup archive from the /home/backup directory on the AC to a directory on a remote server. 1) If not already in the backup utility, login as ac_installer and run the backup utility. # ac_backup -m 1 2) Type 5 and press <Enter>. A numbered list of backup archives will be shown, with a prompt asking which archive should be copied: 1) ac_bkp_AC-5-1__SR1.1.0-67.0__2010_02_03_16_28_CFG_LOGS_DB.tar.gz 2) ac_bkp_AC-5-1__SR1.1.0-67.0__2010_02_04_16_21_CFG_LOGS_DB.tar.gz 3) ExitOyster 3G AC Operations Manual Backup and RestoreOY3G_OPM_200 v7.0 for IPA1.0 © ip.access Limited 2011 Page 87
  • 95. Choose the backup image to copy: 3) Type the required number and press <Enter>. A prompt will ask for the remote server address. The previously used address will be given as the default. For example: Enter the hostname or ip [10.255.254.192]: 4) Type the required hostname or IP address and press <Enter>. A prompt will ask for the directory path on the remote server. The previously used path will be given as the default. For example: Enter the path [/tmp/]: 5) Type the required path and press <Enter>. A prompt will ask for the user name on the remote server. The previously used user name will be given as the default. For example: Enter the username [root]: 6) Type the required user name and press <Enter>. An scp command to copy the archive file to the remote server will be initiated. If this Management Card has not previously connected to the remote computer on the current software installation, a prompt relating to host key verification may appear. Answer yes to continue. If a password prompt appears, enter the password for the user name on the remote server. Note: To avoid the need to enter a password, use ssh key exchange so that the ac_installer user name can login to the remote computer without needing to enter a password. However, first ensure this is acceptable under the security policy for the network the Management Cards are connected to. Further information about key exchange is outside the scope of this manual. Once the connection has been established to the remote server, the copy progress will be shown: ac_bkp_AC-5-1__SR1.1.0-67.0__2010_02_04_16_21_CFG_LOGS_DB.tar.gz 100% 217MB 43.5MB/s 00:05 When the copy is complete, the copy prompt will be shown again. Choose the backup image to copy: 7) Repeat the copy process as needed. 8) When all the required archives have been copied, type the number assigned to the Exit option and press <Enter>. The main menu will appear. 9) If no other actions are required, exit the backup utility and logout.Oyster 3G AC Operations Manual Backup and RestoreOY3G_OPM_200 v7.0 for IPA1.0 © ip.access Limited 2011 Page 88
  • 96. 7.7.5 Copy Archive From a Remote Server Use this option to copy a backup archive from a specified directory on a remote server back to the /home/backup directory on the AC. 1) If not already in the backup utility, login as ac_installer and run the backup utility. # ac_backup -m 1 2) Type 6 and press <Enter>. A prompt will ask for the remote server address. The previously used address will be given as the default. For example: Enter the hostname or ip [10.255.254.192]: 3) Type the required hostname or IP address and press <Enter>. A prompt will ask for the directory path on the remote server. The previously used path will be given as the default. For example: Enter the path [/tmp/]: 4) Type the required path and press <Enter>. A prompt will ask for the user name on the remote server. The previously used user name will be given as the default. For example: Enter the username [root]: 5) Type the required user name and press <Enter>. The utility will connect to the remote server. If necessary, the password will be requested. Also confirm any questions relating to host key verification. If a warning appears that the host has been added to the known hosts, this may be safely ignored. Choose the backup image to copy: 6) A numbered list of backup archives will be shown, with a prompt asking which archive should be copied: 1) ac_bkp_AC-5-1__SR1.1.0-67.0__2010_02_03_16_28_CFG_LOGS_DB.tar.gz 2) ac_bkp_AC-5-1__SR1.1.0-67.0__2010_02_04_16_21_CFG_LOGS_DB.tar.gz 3) Exit Choose the backup to copy from: 7) Type the required number and press <Enter>. The file will be copied, then the copy prompt will be shown again. Choose the backup to copy from: 8) Repeat the copy process as needed. 9) When all the required archives have been copied, type the number assigned to the Exit option and press <Enter>. The main menu will appear. 10) If no other actions are required, exit the backup utility and logout.Oyster 3G AC Operations Manual Backup and RestoreOY3G_OPM_200 v7.0 for IPA1.0 © ip.access Limited 2011 Page 89
  • 97. 8 General Maintenance This section describes recommended regular maintenance and monitoring activities.8.1 Air Filters8.1.1 Air Filter Cleaning Clean the air filter regularly to ensure proper filtration and airflow, and thereby make sure the AC operates efficiently. The exact interval for cleaning depends on the local environment for the AC, but is in the range 30 to 90 days. Do not exceed 90 days before cleaning the air filter. After removing the air filter from the chassis, inspect it to determine if it should be replaced rather than cleaned. If the filter can be cleaned, use one of the following methods to clean the air filter: • Use a vacuum cleaner on the inlet side, to remove dust and particles. • Use an oil-free compressed air blower to blow in reverse of the normal air flow direction, from the exhaust side to the inlet side • Rinse with clean cold water, then let the filter stand and dry completely before it is reinstalled in the AC • Wash in warm water with mild detergent added, rinse with clean water then let the filter stand and dry completely before it is reinstalled in the AC A filter can be cleaned a maximum of three times. See section 10.2 for instructions on removing and reinstalling the air filter.8.1.2 Replacement Air Filters The filter currently in the AC should be discarded and replaced either within a year of receipt or after three cleaning cycles, whichever comes first. It is recommended to keep a supply of replacement filters available. Store in a cool, dry, dark environment. Do not keep replacement filters for longer than a year. High temperatures, high humidity and ultraviolet light will degrade the polyurethane foam. Ideally the storage conditions should be a dark container or dark plastic sleeving, with relative humidity between 40% and 80% and temperature between 4.4° C and 32.2° C (40° F–90° F). Also avoid exposure to solvents and sulphates, such as engine exhaust, as these can degrade the polyurethane foam.Oyster 3G AC Operations Manual General MaintenanceOY3G_OPM_200 v7.0 for IPA1.0 © ip.access Limited 2011 Page 90
  • 98. 9 Hardware Replacement This section provides general information about replacing Oyster 3G AC hardware components, and includes generic procedures for the main cards and their sub-components. Where relevant, the generic procedures are referenced from the procedures for replacing specific components in the sections that follow.9.1 Service Affecting All hardware replacement procedures are potentially service affecting. Therefore, it is recommended to only undertake any hardware replacement procedure during a maintenance window. If it is not possible to wait for a maintenance window, try to minimise service disruption by choosing a time when call rates are reduced. In some cases, such as a complete AC outage, it may be necessary to proceed without waiting for a maintenance window so that the AC can recover.9.2 About Hot Swap All the field replaceable units (FRUs) within the Oyster 3G AC have hot swap capability. Most of the FRUs have a blue LED for indicating hot swap status, as follows: Hot Swap Status LED LED State Hardware Status Comments Off Normal operation Normal operation from a hot swap perspective only, so this does not necessarily mean the hardware is functioning correctly Flashing Shutting down The hardware is attempting to enter hot swap status, and is shutting down On (steady) Hot swap (i.e. off) The hardware has stopped running and is in the hot swap state - the FRU can be safely powered off and/or removed from the AC An FRU that has a hot swap LED should not be removed from the AC until it has entered hot swap status. The only exception is when a particular FRU is known to have failed such that attempts to put it into hot swap will not succeed. Some FRUs (such as SFPs and the air filter) do not have a hot swap LED. In most cases, such items can simply be replaced as needed.9.2.1 Hot Swap Limitations Linux does not support PCI-Express hot swap. This applies to the version of Linux running on the ATCA-1200 Carrier card. This affects PCI-Express devices such as the AMC-7211. There are two workarounds for this, both of which require a service interruption: • Use the hot swap latch to hot swap the Carrier Card before hot swapping the AMC that is the PCI-Express device. • Stop the AC applications, use hpi commands to power down the AMC in the bay, then power it up again. See 5.2.3 Extract and Insert with HPI for the procedure. Restart the AC applications.Oyster 3G AC Operations Manual Hardware ReplacementOY3G_OPM_200 v7.0 for IPA1.0 © ip.access Limited 2011 Page 91
  • 99. 9.3 Platform Manager and Unresponsive Components Platform Manager, introduced in section 4.3.5, is responsible for monitoring the state of hardware components, and will attempt to reactivate components that become unresponsive. The attempts to reactivate unresponsive components will take a variable amount of time, depending on how easily the component can be reactivated. It may be necessary for Platform Manager to try several times before a component is recovered into an operational state. When a hardware component becomes unresponsive, an alarm will appear in the OMC-R Client as an Equipment Alarm alarm with a probable cause of Hardware Failure on the component. In the alarms lists, a component name is shown in the MOC (Managed Object Class) column. If the Hardware Failure alarm has not automatically cleared after 30 minutes, a failed component can be replaced in service, as described in this and the following sections. Allow a wait period of 30 minutes between removing a faulty component and installing its replacement. Alternatively, wait for a maintenance window and attempt other troubleshooting actions, such as: • Use HPI to hot swap the component (section 5.2.3) while the AC applications are stopped (section 3.6.6). • Physically extract the component, wait 30 minutes then reinstall the component. When doing this, only extract the component far enough to disengage it from the backplane or AMC bay connectors. There is no need to remove the componente completely from its slot or AMC bay.9.4 Safety and Handling Precautions The safety and handling precautions in this section should be observed when working with an AC and/or AC components. These are general precautions. For additional safety details and also for regulatory information, see [GST_200]. WARNING This product contains static-sensitive components and should be handled with care. Failure to employ adequate anti-static measures can cause irreparable damage to components.9.4.1 General Precautions The components in the Oyster 3G AC chassis can be damaged by electrostatic discharge and it must be handled with care. The components must be handled when wearing a ground wrist strap at a groundwork area except when handling the power cables. Failure to employ adequate anti-static measures when working with the AC chassis and components can cause irreparable damage to the components. If working with any power supply components for the AC chassis, take the following safety precautions: • Take off any ESD wrist strap when handling the power cables or other power supply components. • Make sure that the chassis is adequately grounded. • Do not touch a power cable when power is supplied.Oyster 3G AC Operations Manual Hardware ReplacementOY3G_OPM_200 v7.0 for IPA1.0 © ip.access Limited 2011 Page 92
  • 100. • Do not place wires, screwdrivers, meter probes, oscilloscope probes, or other electrically conducting material into contact with a live power cable or anything connected to a live power cable. • Do not wear any watches, bracelets, and rings when working with a live power cable or anything connected to a live power cable. • Failure to follow recommendations above may cause personal injury or damage electronic equipment. An electrical voltage of up to 75 VDC may be present at any power connection.9.4.2 Hardware Module Handling Precautions Wear a grounded ESD wrist-strap when handling the Oyster 3G AC hardware components, except when working with power supply components. Components must only be removed from their ESD shielding bags when required. Do not leave any of the AC hardware modules laying around outside their ESD shielding bags. Make sure that all the hardware modules are wrapped up in an appropriate ESD shielding bag and stored in a safe place when not installed in a chassis.9.4.3 Laser Safety The optical SFPs/XFPs incorporate a Class 1 laser (according to the current version of EN 60825-1 and IEC 60825-1) that is considered to be safe under normal operating conditions. However, it is advised not to look directly into the laser.9.5 Detailed Replacement Procedures Replacement procedures for the majority of AC components are provided in individual manuals.9.5.1 Manuals with Procedures to Pre-Prepare Replacement Components Each manual listed below has a procedure to prepare a replacement component in a spare chassis in advance of the maintenance window, then replace the faulty component during the maintenance window with the pre-prepared component. This is the recommended approach as this minimises the time needed for the maintenance window and hence also minimises the service impact. • OY3G_OPM_251 Oyster 3G AC Management Card Replacement • OY3G_OPM_253 Oyster 3G AC Diskless SBC Card Replacement • OY3G_OPM_255 Oyster 3G AC Carrier Card Replacement • OY3G_OPM_257 Oyster 3G AC SCM Replacement • OY3G_OPM_259 Oyster 3G AC RTM for SCM Replacement • OY3G_OPM_273 Oyster 3G AC Iu/ATM Interface AMC Replacement • OY3G_OPM_275 Oyster 3G AC Ethernet AMC Replacement Each of the manuals also has an alternative procedure, where everything is done during the maintenance window. This requires the AC applications to be stopped to allow configuration of the replacement hardware before bringing it into service.Oyster 3G AC Operations Manual Hardware ReplacementOY3G_OPM_200 v7.0 for IPA1.0 © ip.access Limited 2011 Page 93
  • 101. Dedicated Chassis Example Whenever possible, as noted above, use a spare chassis to configure replacement parts before they are installed in an operational AC. This can be a dedicated chassis for configuring replacement parts or, for example, a laboratory AC that can be stopped and used to configure replacement parts on an ad-hoc basis. A dedicated chassis for parts configuration will need a minimal hardware complement that is sufficient to allow configuration of any replacement part. This will not be functional as an AC. Here is an example of a minimal hardware setup: Bootable SCM Empty ATCA-4300 ATCA-2210 ATCA-1200 Use Bay 1 for iSPAN 3650 config Use Bay 1 for HDD AMC-3202 config Use Bay 4 HDD for AMC-7211 AMC-3202 config 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 Use Slot 2 Use Slot 8 Use Slot 10 for ATCA-4300 for ATCA-2210 for ATCA-1200 config config config This allows: • Any ATCA-4300 card to be prepared in Slot 2 • An SCM to be prepared in Slot 8 • An SPM (SCM RTM) to be prepared in the rear slot for Slot 7 • A Carrier Card to be prepared in Slot 10 • An iSPAN 3650 to be prepared in Bay 1 of the ATCA-1200 Card in Slot 9 • An AMC-7211 to be prepared in Bay 4 of the ATCA-1200 Card in Slot 9 The hardware replacement procedures in manuals above assume that a spare chassis similar to this is available for configuring replacement hardware, prior to installing the replacement hardware in the relevant AC. Replacement Procedure Overview When using a spare chassis, the general procedure to replace an ATCA card or AMC is: • Before a maintenance window, prepare the replacement part as follows: • Install the replacement component in the spare chassis.Oyster 3G AC Operations Manual Hardware ReplacementOY3G_OPM_200 v7.0 for IPA1.0 © ip.access Limited 2011 Page 94
  • 102. • Make sure the spare chassis has the correct firmware and/or other software to update the replacement component so that it is correctly commissioned for the target AC. • Update the firmware and/or other software on the replacement component. • Remove the replacement component from the spare chassis. • In a maintenance window, do the following: • Use commands to put the faulty component in the hot swap state, to illuminate the hot swap LED and thereby help the on-site engineer correctly identify the faulty part. • If necessary, note any cable connections to the faulty component then disconnect the cables. • Remove hardware items installed in the faulty component, such as any AMCs that are in an ATCA card or SFPs installed in an AMC. • Remove the faulty component. • Install the replacement component. • Re-install any hardware items removed from the faulty component. • Start up the replacement component. • Wait for platform manager to attempt to bring the component into service. • Peform tests and, if necessary, restart the AC applications to help bring the replacement component into service.9.5.2 Manuals with Maintenance Window Only Procedures Each manual listed below has a replacement procedure where everything is done during the maintenance window. This applies to components that either do not require advance configuration or that cannot be prepared before the maintenance window. • OY3G_OPM_265 Oyster 3G AC SBC Card RAM Replacement • OY3G_OPM_266 Oyster 3G AC SBC Card Firmware Upgrade Jumper • OY3G_OPM_267 Oyster 3G AC Filler Module Replacement • OY3G_OPM_271 Oyster 3G AC Hard Disk AMC Replacement Replacement Procedure Overview When replacing an ATCA card or AMC entirely within a maintenance window, the general procedure is: • Make sure the AC has the correct firmware and/or other software to update the replacement component so that it can be correctly commissioned. This can be done in advance of the maintenance window. • Make sure the replacement component is ready to be installed. For example, make sure an ATC-4300 card as the correct amount of RAM and the firmware update jumper installed. This can be done in advance of the maintenance window. • Stop the AC applications.Oyster 3G AC Operations Manual Hardware ReplacementOY3G_OPM_200 v7.0 for IPA1.0 © ip.access Limited 2011 Page 95
  • 103. • Use commands to put the faulty component in the hot swap state, to illuminate the hot swap LED and thereby help the on-site engineer correctly identify the faulty part. • If necessary, note any cable connections to the faulty component then disconnect the cables. • Remove hardware items installed in the faulty component, such as any AMCs that are in an ATCA card or SFPs installed in an AMC. • Remove the faulty component from the AC. • Install the replacement component in the AC. • Re-install any hardware items removed from the faulty component. • Start up the replacement component. • Update the firmware and/or other software on the replacement component. • Start the AC applications. • Peform tests to verify that the replacement component is in service.9.5.3 Other Replacement Procedures The replacement procedures for the following components are in this manual: • Air Filter - section 10.2 • AMM (fan) - section 10.3 • PEM (power supply) - section 10.4Oyster 3G AC Operations Manual Hardware ReplacementOY3G_OPM_200 v7.0 for IPA1.0 © ip.access Limited 2011 Page 96
  • 104. 10 Miscellaneous Hardware Replacement Procedures This section describes the steps necessary for replacing the following faulty hardware in an Oyster 3G AC: • Air Filter • AMMs (Air Move Modules - the fans) • PEMs (Power Entry Modules) WARNING This product contains static-sensitive components and should be handled with care. Failure to employ adequate anti-static measures can cause irreparable damage to components. Refer to section 9.4 for safety and handling precautions that must be observed when working with an AC and/or AC components.10.1 Component Replacement Requirements Whenever possible, a component should be replaced without stopping the AC applications, so that service interruptions are avoided. This is achievable with any single component in the AC. The following table summarises the requirements for each replaceable component covered in this section: Component Requirements PEM (power entry module) No special requirements AMM (air mover module) No special requirements Air filter The air filter has been in stock for less than one year, and has been stored correctly in a clean, cool and dark environment10.2 Replace the Air Filter Note: See section 8.1 for information about cleaning the air filter and how often the air filter should be replaced.10.2.1 Remove the Filter 1) Locate the two tabs at the front of the filter frame. 2) Push the tabs toward the rear of the shelf, to allow the filter to drop down. 3) Remove the filter. The filter sensor will generate an error, because the shelf is operating with the filter removed.Oyster 3G AC Operations Manual Miscellaneous Hardware Replacement ProceduresOY3G_OPM_200 v7.0 for IPA1.0 © ip.access Limited 2011 Page 97
  • 105. 10.2.2 Install the Replacement Filter 4) With the filter frame tabs facing forward and pointing down, insert the filter into the air intake. 5) Push the filter into the shelf until it meets the springs at the back of the air intake. 6) Press the filter against the springs and lift it up as far as it will go. Release pressure so that the springs push the filter into the guides at the front. Ensure the front of the filter is flush against the front of the air intake, and that only the tabs are visible.10.3 Replace an AMM10.3.1 Remotely Hot Swap and Identify the Faulty AMM Put the faulty AMM in the hot swap state using commands from the SCM. This is to help the on-site engineer to correctly identify the AMM that must be replaced. 1) Put on a grounding wrist strap and connect its other end at the front of the AC chassis. 2) Unlatch and open the hinged front panel. 3) Login to the SCM as root, using IP address 192.168.16.17. 4) In the root session on the SCM, execute the following command sequence until the resource ID prompt appears: # hpiapp 5) AT the prompts, type h and 9 as follows (do not press <Enter>): Cmd> h HotSwap Cmd> 9 6) At the prompt, enter the correct <resource_ID> for the faulty AMM: Enter Resource ID [0x0]: 0x<resource_ID>Oyster 3G AC Operations Manual Miscellaneous Hardware Replacement ProceduresOY3G_OPM_200 v7.0 for IPA1.0 © ip.access Limited 2011 Page 98
  • 106. The <resource_ID> is one of: AMM Location Looking at Chassis Front Resource ID Upper Left AMM 0x104c8 Upper Right AMM 0x204ca Lower Left AMM (recessed) 0x304cc Lower Right AMM (recessed) 0x404ce 7) Select Action Extraction by typing 1: Select [0]: 1 8) Verify that the on-site engineer can see an AMM with a flashing blue hot swap LED, and that it matches the AMM that has been put in the hot swap state. This will confirm which AMM needs replacing. Do not proceed until the on-site engineer has identified the correct AMM. The hot swap LED will turn steady blue after a short time. Note: If the hot swap LED is not lit on any of the AMMs, it is possible that the AMM has failed completely and that the hot swap LED is non-functional. However, it may also be the case that the on-site engineer is looking at a different AC. It is recommended to stop immediately and escalate for assistance. Note: If the hot swap LED is lit on more than one AMM, stop immediately and escalate for assistance. 9) To exit the hpiapp utility, type q until the SCM command prompt reappears. 10) Return to the Management Card: # exitOyster 3G AC Operations Manual Miscellaneous Hardware Replacement ProceduresOY3G_OPM_200 v7.0 for IPA1.0 © ip.access Limited 2011 Page 99
  • 107. 10.3.2 Remove an AMM Use care when handling the AMMs. Never handle the AMM by its connector. Improper handling of AMMs could cause damage to the connector pins or to the SDP. 11) On the AMM to be removed, move the toggle switch to the right (the open position). The hot swap LED will stay steady blue. The speed of the other AMMs may have increased to compensate for the deactivated AMM. 12) Wait 5 minutes to ensure the impeller has completely stopped spinning. Do not rely on the hot-swap LED to indicate readiness for removal as the hot swap LED will stop flashing long before the impeller stops spinning. WARNING! Gyroscopic forces can cause the AMM to move in unexpected ways if the impeller is still spinning. This may cause injury or damage to equipment, especially if the AMM is dropped. 13) Use one of the following procedures to remove the AMM according to whether it is in the upper or lower position. Upper AMM Removal 14) Grasp the AMM via the two round finger holes. An internal barrier prevents contact with the impeller. 15) Apply just enough force to remove the AMM. Support its weight with the other hand as it clears the chassis. Store it in an ESD shielding bag.Oyster 3G AC Operations Manual Miscellaneous Hardware Replacement ProceduresOY3G_OPM_200 v7.0 for IPA1.0 © ip.access Limited 2011 Page 100
  • 108. Lower AMM Removal 16) Use a 5.5mm hex socket that is at least 200mm (8 inches) long to slightly loosen the locking screws that secure the AMM handle. Loosen them enough that the handle can move. Do not remove the screws. 17) Twist the handle clockwise slightly so that the latch projection that locks the AMM into the chassis disengages. 18) Apply gentle pressure to pull the AMM out just far enough for the latch to clear. This can be done by hooking fingers behind the handle and pressing with one or both thumbs against the shelf that supports the upper AMMs. 19) Use one hand to remove the AMM from the chassis. Support its weight with the other hand as it clears the chassis. 20) Place the AMM on a flat ESD-protected surface. 21) Completely remove the loosened screws that attach the handle to the AMM. 22) Set the handle and screws aside for reuse. Store the AMM in an ESD shielding bag.10.3.3 Install a Replacement AMM 23) Remove the replacement AMM from the shipping box, and perform a thorough inspection. Make sure all the connector pins on the AMM are straight.Oyster 3G AC Operations Manual Miscellaneous Hardware Replacement ProceduresOY3G_OPM_200 v7.0 for IPA1.0 © ip.access Limited 2011 Page 101
  • 109. 24) On the replacement AMM, move the toggle switch to the right (the open position). 25) Use one of the following procedures to install the AMM according to whether it is in the upper or lower position. Install an Upper AMM 26) Slide the AMM into the empty slot until its connector properly mates with the connector on the backplane. Install a Lower AMM 27) Attach the handle to the replacement AMM, using the screws removed from the faulty AMM. Do not tighten the screws so much that the handle cannot rotate. 28) Twist the handle clockwise and guide the AMM into the empty slot until its connector properly mates with the connector on the backplane. 29) Turn the handle counterclockwise until the latch engages. 30) Using a 5.5mm hex socket with a handle that is at least 200mm (8 inches) long, tighten the screws to secure the AMM in the chassis.10.3.4 Activate the AMM 31) Check that the hot swap LED and out of service LED are lit solid. If they are not, the AMM may be improperly installed or defective. 32) To ready the AMM for activation, move its hot swap switch to the left (the closed position). Note: If the switch stays in the open position for more than 15 seconds, the AMM may be activated automatically.10.3.5 Take the AMM Out of Hot Swap 33) Login to the SCM as root, using IP address 192.168.16.17. 34) In the root session on the SCM, execute the following command sequence until the resource ID prompt appears:Oyster 3G AC Operations Manual Miscellaneous Hardware Replacement ProceduresOY3G_OPM_200 v7.0 for IPA1.0 © ip.access Limited 2011 Page 102
  • 110. # hpiapp Cmd> h HotSwap Cmd> 9 35) At the prompt, enter the correct <resource_ID> for the replacement AMM: Enter Resource ID [0x0]: <resource_ID> The <resource_ID> is one of: AMM Location Looking at Chassis Front Resource ID Upper Left AMM 0x104c8 Upper Right AMM 0x204ca Lower Left AMM (recessed) 0x304cc Lower Right AMM (recessed) 0x404ce 36) Select Action Insertion by typing 0 (zero): Select [0]: 0 37) The on-site engineer should immediately see the blue hot swap LED flashing and then it will extinguish. Do not proceed until the on-site engineer has verified this. Note: If the AMM does not start up, stop immediately and escalate for assistance. 38) To exit the hpiapp utility, type q until the SCM command prompt reappears.10.3.6 Close the Front Panel 39) Close the hinged front panel and secure the latches.10.4 Replace a PEM WARNING! • Do not use a grounding wrist strap while working with power cables, because this increases the risk of electrical shock. • Before making or breaking connections to the PEM, ensure the power feed cabling is not powered. • Do not touch a power cable when power is supplied. • Do not place wires, screwdrivers, meter probes, oscilloscope probes, or other electrically conducting material in contact with a live power cable or anything connected to a live power cable. • Remove grounded wrist straps before connecting power or ground cables. • Do not wear any watches, bracelets, and rings when working with a live power cable or anything connected to a live power cable. Ignoring any of these precautions may cause personal injury or damage electronic equipment. An electrical current with a potential of up to 75 VDC may be present at any power connection.Oyster 3G AC Operations Manual Miscellaneous Hardware Replacement ProceduresOY3G_OPM_200 v7.0 for IPA1.0 © ip.access Limited 2011 Page 103
  • 111. For maximum safety, exercise extreme caution, and use tools with properly insulated handles.10.4.1 Hot Swap the PEM Put the faulty PEM in the hot swap state using commands from the SCM. This is to help the on-site engineer to correctly identify the PEM that must be replaced. 1) Login to the SCM as root, using IP address 192.168.16.17. 2) In the root session on the SCM, execute the following command sequence until the resource ID prompt appears: # hpiapp 3) AT the prompts, type h and 9 as follows (do not press <Enter>): Cmd> h HotSwap Cmd> 9 4) At the prompt, enter the correct <resource_ID> for the faulty PEM: Enter Resource ID [0x0]: 0x<resource_ID> The <resource_ID> is one of: PEM Location Looking at Chassis Back Resource ID Left PEM 0x101c4 Right PEM 0x201c6 5) Select Action Extraction by typing 1: Select [0]: 1 6) Verify that the on-site engineer can see a PEM with a flashing blue hot swap LED, and that it matches the PEM that has been put in the hot swap state. This will confirm which PEM needs replacing. Do not proceed until the on-site engineer has identified the correct PEM. The hot swap LED will turn steady blue after a short time. Note: If the hot swap LED is not lit on either of the PEMs, it is possible that the PEM has failed completely and that the hot swap LED is non-functional. However, it may also be the case that the on-site engineer is looking at a different AC. It is recommended to stop immediately and escalate for assistance. Note: If the hot swap LED is lit on more than one PEM, stop immediately and escalate for assistance. 7) To exit the hpiapp utility, type q until the SCM command prompt reappears. 8) Return to the Management Card: # exitOyster 3G AC Operations Manual Miscellaneous Hardware Replacement ProceduresOY3G_OPM_200 v7.0 for IPA1.0 © ip.access Limited 2011 Page 104
  • 112. 10.4.2 Remove a PEM 9) Turn off the main power to the PEM. Note: The LEDs on the PEM may remain lit, since they are now receiving power from the redundant PEM. 10) Double-check to verify that the power feed cabling to the PEM is not powered. 11) Move the hot swap switch to the Open position. The hot-swap LED on the PEM should stay lit solid. Protective Cover Attachment Screws -(POWER) Operating Voltage -40.5VDC to -72VDC Maximum Current 90A Mounting Torque nuts to 7.12Nm (63 lbf.in) Max. Mounting Screws Screws +(RETURN) OFF ON Closed Open Reverse Present Power Power OOS H/S Handle Power Switch Power Connectors LEDs Hot Swap (Circuit Breaker) Switch 12) Move the circuit breaker on the PEM to the OFF position (so the red portion is not visible on the side of the circuit breaker). 13) Loosen the PEM’s protective-cover screws, remove the protective cover, and set it aside. 14) Remove the M6 nuts and lock washers that secure the power feed connectors to the PEM, and set them aside. 15) Remove the power feed cables, and place them out of the way. Make sure that the ends of the cables do not touch each other or any other conductive surface. 16) Unfasten the four M3 captive mounting screws (two on each side). 17) Slide the PEM out, and store it in an ESD shielding bag.10.4.3 Install the Replacement PEM 18) Remove the replacement PEM from the shipping box, and perform a thorough inspection. Make sure all the connector pins on the PEM are straight. 19) Ensure the hot swap switch is set to the right, to the Open position. 20) Insert the replacement PEM into the empty slot.Oyster 3G AC Operations Manual Miscellaneous Hardware Replacement ProceduresOY3G_OPM_200 v7.0 for IPA1.0 © ip.access Limited 2011 Page 105
  • 113. 21) Fasten the four M3 captive mounting screws, and torque them to 0.90 N/m (8 lbf/in). 22) Connect the power feed cables (see table below for requirements) to the appropriate PEM connections. Refit the M6 nuts and washers and torque the nuts to 7.12 N/m (63 lbf/in). Note: The manufacturer recommends that the power feed cables exit to the right (as viewed from the rear of the shelf). If the power wiring where the AC is installed requires that the power feed cables exit to the left, be careful to allow for access to the circuit breaker. 23) Turn on the main power feed to the PEM. WARNING! If the power feed cables are reversed, the circuit breaker will trip immediately. Turn off the main power to the PEM, check the wiring polarity, reverse the power feed cables, and repeat this step. 24) Move the PEM’s circuit breaker to the ON position (so the red potion is visible on the side of the circuit breaker). 25) Check that the PEM’s power LED is lit solid. 26) Move the hot swap switch to the left to the Closed position. The hot-swap LED should stay lit until the PEM is taken out of hot swap by hpiapp.10.4.4 Take the PEM Out of Hot Swap 27) Login to the active SCM, using IP address 192.168.16.17, as root. 28) In the root session on the SCM, execute the following command sequence until the resource ID prompt appears: # hpiapp Cmd> h HotSwap Cmd> 9 29) At the prompt, enter the correct <resource_ID> for the replacement PEM: Enter Resource ID [0x0]: <resource_ID> The <resource_ID> is one of: PEM Location Looking at Chassis Back Resource ID Left PEM 0x101c4 Right PEM 0x201c6 30) Select Action Insertion by typing 0 (zero): Select [0]: 0 31) The on-site engineer should immediately see the blue hot swap LED flashing and then it will extinguish. Do not proceed until the on-site engineer has verified this.Oyster 3G AC Operations Manual Miscellaneous Hardware Replacement ProceduresOY3G_OPM_200 v7.0 for IPA1.0 © ip.access Limited 2011 Page 106
  • 114. Note: If the PEM does not start up, stop immediately and escalate for assistance. 32) To exit the hpiapp utility, type q until the SCM command prompt reappears.Oyster 3G AC Operations Manual Miscellaneous Hardware Replacement ProceduresOY3G_OPM_200 v7.0 for IPA1.0 © ip.access Limited 2011 Page 107
  • 115. 11 CLI Reference The AC includes CLIs (command line interfaces) for gathering status information about the various applications and systems in the AC. This section provides information on: • The main AC CLI (debug.sh), use this for gathering information on the AC applications and components • The CLI in the iSPAN 3650, use this mainly for information about ATM connectivity This section does not provide information on modification of any parameters on the Access Controller which may be service affecting. Note: Whenever possible, use the health check utility (hc) to obtain information about the current state of the AC rather than using either of these CLIs. See 5.1.2 Health Check for more information. Note: Each CLI also has the capability to make configuration changes which may be service affecting. Do not undertake such actions without proper training. Do not experiment with any commands that are not described in this section.Oyster 3G AC Operations Manual CLI ReferenceOY3G_OPM_200 v7.0 for IPA1.0 © ip.access Limited 2011 Page 108
  • 116. 11.1 Access Controller CLI The Access Controller CLI is a command orientated mechanism to interact with processes running on the Access Controller. The following factors apply to using the AC CLI: • The CLI must be executed on a slot with active components • Executing “ps aux | grep Ssl” should show the processes for the applications expected to run on the card, as listed in section 4.2 • Only a single instance of the CLI can be started on each ATCA-4300 blade • Command history is not retained after exiting • The CLI does not save a log of commands executed11.1.1 Start the CLI 1) To start the AC CLI, it is recommended to login as the admin user and select option 2 for ASP Debug Console from the Main Menu. To start the AC CLI from other user logins, execute the debug.sh script: # /opt/asp/bin/debug.sh When the AC CLI starts, the following prompt will appear: cli[Test]-> If the CLI is already running on the current card then output similar to the following will appear: PID[5235]:File[eo.c]:Func[clEoCreate]:Line[832]: EO: iocCoreCommRegister FAILED PID[5235]:File[clEo.c]:Func[clEoMain]:Line[687]: Creating EO Failed 50101 PID[5235]:File[clEoMain.c]:Func[main]:Line[111]: EO main failed, rc = [0x50101] If needed, run the CLI on a different ATCA-4300 card where it is not already running. Note: If the command fails and there are no other instances of debug.sh running, this means that the current user session does not have permission to use the AC CLI. Logout and use the admin user ID instead.11.1.2 Navigate the CLI The CLI is a multi levelled system. Navigate through the levels by entering commands to move up or down a level. The CLI has a dynamic prompt that shows the current level. For example, for progressively deeper levels: cli[Test]-> cli[Test:ManagementCardI0]-> cli[Test:ManagementCardI0:DEFAULT]-> For the sake of brevity, this is abbreviated to the > character, except where the whole prompt is needed for illustration and/or to remove any ambiguity.Oyster 3G AC Operations Manual CLI ReferenceOY3G_OPM_200 v7.0 for IPA1.0 © ip.access Limited 2011 Page 109
  • 117. Move Up a Level 2) Use the setc command along with the required context as an argument. For example, after starting the CLI: cli[Test]-> setc <slot> Where <slot> is 1 to 6, for the chassis slot number of the card that will be interrogated. The prompt will change according to the card selected. For example, for the second Management Card in slot 2: cli[Test:ManagementCardI1]-> Move Down a Level 3) Use the end command. Executing this command at the entry level will not exit the CLI or move down any further. The CLI will display a message that means the lowest level has been reached. cli[Test]-> end Can not exit context any further History 4) Use the up and down arrow keys to browse through the command history. 5) To display the command history, execute the history command. Help 6) Use the help or ? command to list all the available commands at the current level. At the entry level the output from help will be: setc - set context to component end - exit current mode bye - quit debugging help - lists commands in current mode ? - lists commands in current mode list - list components to which setc can be done in current mode history - display the last 100 commands executed timeoutset - set the timeout for the debug session timeoutget - get the timeout of the debug session sleep - sleep for the specified time The output is context sensitive according to the current slot and/or component selection. List 7) Use the list command to display the available running components at the current level. Run this command at the initial level to display the available slots: Slot Node 1 ManagementCardI0 2 ManagementCardI1 3 StacksCardI0 4 StacksCardI1Oyster 3G AC Operations Manual CLI ReferenceOY3G_OPM_200 v7.0 for IPA1.0 © ip.access Limited 2011 Page 110
  • 118. 5 CallControlCardI0 6 CallControlCardI1 8) After setting the context to a particular slot, use the list command to display all the running components at the new level. For example, running list on slot 1 will produce output similar to this: cpm MgmtModuleI0 nameServer_ManagementCardI0 ckptServer_ManagementCardI0 FaultManagerI0 AC_DBI0 MgmtProxyIAPI0 PlatformManagerI0 IapControllerI0 APControllerI0 logServer_ManagementCardI0 gmsServer_ManagementCardI0 MeasurementControllerI0 eventServer_ManagementCardI0 MgmtProxyATMI0 OmcrClientI011.1.3 Exit the CLI 9) To end the session, use the bye command. Use this command can be used at any level to return to the Linux command prompt. > bye Good bye!!Oyster 3G AC Operations Manual CLI ReferenceOY3G_OPM_200 v7.0 for IPA1.0 © ip.access Limited 2011 Page 111
  • 119. 11.1.4 Component Command Summary The following table summarises the key commands for each Card type and Component. Management Card AP Controller displayApConnections (can be service affecting) displayMfConnections displayApdr OMCR Client omcrInfo queueStat Stacks Card Alcap alcapCliHelp ALCAP_GET_PVC_STATUS MTP3B mtp3bCliHelp mtp3bCliManager Call Control Card UECCC uecccCliHelp printCNStatus getUeByImsi getAllUes getUesBy3gapId displayApdr UMR umrCliHelp umrCliManager Paging displayApdr TRUM trumCliHelp trumCliManager UPP Proxy uppCliHelp uppCliManager Iu Controller listIuBoardInfo listOptInfo listPvcInfo getPvcStatistics getAal2ChannelStatistics getGtpuTunnelStatistics getApsStatusOyster 3G AC Operations Manual CLI ReferenceOY3G_OPM_200 v7.0 for IPA1.0 © ip.access Limited 2011 Page 112
  • 120. 11.1.5 Management Card To select a Management Card, use setc 1 or setc 2 from the entry level of the CLI. AP Controller (APControllerI0) The important commands from the help command at this level are displayConnections - display connections displayApdr - display APDR BDB records displayApConnections WARNING: On an AC with more than 500 APs connected, this command may affect service. The likelihood and severity of service impact increases with the number of connected APs. Use the hc --summaryaps command to determine the current number of connected APs before using displayApConnections. Usage: displayApConnections Show all APs that have initiated a connection attempt to the AC. The output shows the current connection status of each AP, followed by a summary: > displayApConnections AP Connection Table =================== Inst ApId Serial no. MfCon Connection state ---- ---- ---------- ----- ---------------- 1 2726 0022CE-0000159013 0 ALL::SYNCHRONISED 2 9527 0022CE-0000159527 0 ALL::SYNCHRONISED Total AP connection objects: 2 Total APs connected to AC: 2 Total APs operational: 2 An AP has an active connection to the AC when the Connection State is ALL::SYNCHRONISED. Any other value shown in this column means the AP has not established a successful connection to the AC or has been switched off since it last failed to connect. APs will be removed from this output after a time period that is configured in the OMC-R. displayMfConnections Usage: displayMfConnections Run this command to show all Iu+ interface AMCs (AMC-7211, aka Cavium) that have a connection to the Management Card. The output will show the current connection status: > displayMfConnections SOIP connections to MF ====================== CId IP Address State APs --- ---------- ----- --- 0 192.168.16.156 Connected 2Oyster 3G AC Operations Manual CLI ReferenceOY3G_OPM_200 v7.0 for IPA1.0 © ip.access Limited 2011 Page 113
  • 121. displayApdr Usage: displayApdr [[-a apid] [-i imsi]] [-m] default display all Run this command without any arguments to display all APs which have contacted the AC. This output does not mean the AP was successful or not. > displayApdr display records in APDR <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< APDR RECORDS DUMP >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> |-------|------------------|------|-------|-------|-------|-------|--------|---------- -|------------|------------|-----------| | APID | IMSI |HANDIN|CELL-ID| LAC |SAILAC | SAC | RAC |LATITUDE | LONGITUDE |UNCERTAINITY|ACCESS MODE| |-------|------------------|------|-------|-------|-------|-------|--------|---------- -|------------|------------|-----------| | 10008 | 123456789012345 | n | -1 | 1 | -1 | -1 | 0 | -10000000 | -10000000 | -1 | open(1) | <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< APDR RECORDS DUMP >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> |-------|------------------|------|-------|-------|-------|-------|--------|---------- -|------------|------------|-----------| | APID | IMSI |HANDIN|CELL-ID| LAC |SAILAC | SAC | RAC |LATITUDE | LONGITUDE |UNCERTAINITY|ACCESS MODE| |-------|------------------|------|-------|-------|-------|-------|--------|---------- -|------------|------------|-----------| | 2361 | 123456789012345 | n | -1 | 1 | -1 | -1 | 0 | -10000000 | -10000000 | -1 | open(1) | <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< APDR RECORDS DUMP >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> |-------|------------------|------|-------|-------|-------|-------|--------|---------- -|------------|------------|-----------| | APID | IMSI |HANDIN|CELL-ID| LAC |SAILAC | SAC | RAC |LATITUDE | LONGITUDE |UNCERTAINITY|ACCESS MODE| |-------|------------------|------|-------|-------|-------|-------|--------|---------- -|------------|------------|-----------| | 623 | 123456789012345 | n | 236 | 11281 | 9701 | 9702 | 1 | -10000000 | -10000000 | -1 | open(1) | <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< APDR RECORDS DUMP >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> |-------|------------------|------|-------|-------|-------|-------|--------|---------- -|------------|------------|-----------| | APID | IMSI |HANDIN|CELL-ID| LAC |SAILAC | SAC | RAC |LATITUDE | LONGITUDE |UNCERTAINITY|ACCESS MODE| |-------|------------------|------|-------|-------|-------|-------|--------|---------- -|------------|------------|-----------| | 134 | 123456789012345 | n | 41331 | 11281 | 9701 | 9702 | 1 | -10000000 | -10000000 | -1 | open(1) | |-------|------------------|------|-------|-------|-------|-------|--------|---------- -|------------|------------|-----------| Displayed 4 records Total 4 records The output can be further refined by using the -a or -i arguments. Use the -a argument to display a single AP, if the AP ID is found: > displayApdr –a 10008Oyster 3G AC Operations Manual CLI ReferenceOY3G_OPM_200 v7.0 for IPA1.0 © ip.access Limited 2011 Page 114
  • 122. display records in APDR <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< APDR RECORDS DUMP >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> |-------|------------------|------|-------|-------|-------|-------|--------|---------- -|------------|------------|-----------| | APID | IMSI |HANDIN|CELL-ID| LAC |SAILAC | SAC | RAC |LATITUDE | LONGITUDE |UNCERTAINITY|ACCESS MODE| |-------|------------------|------|-------|-------|-------|-------|--------|---------- -|------------|------------|-----------| | 10008 | 123456789012345 | n | -1 | 1 | -1 | -1 | 0 | -10000000 | -10000000 | -1 | open(1) | Displayed 1 records Total 1 records Use the -i argument to display all matching APs with matching IMSIs. > displayApdr –i 123456789012345 Note: The output will be similar to the above examples, but filtered by IMSI. OMCR Client (OmcrClientI0) The important commands from the help command at this level are omcrInfo - Print OMCR info queueStat - Print OMCR queue statistics omcrInfo Usage: omcrInfo Show the status of the connection between the AC and OMC-R: > omcrInfo OMCR connection information =========================== IP address: 5.135.64.30 Port number: 3052 ConnectionId: 2 Status: CONNECTED queueStat Usage: queueStat Show the AC <-> OMC-R queue status. > queueStat Mf Client queue statistics ========================== Current buffer size: 0 Maximum buffer size: 10002 Nr of forwarded messages (to OMCR): 1156Oyster 3G AC Operations Manual CLI ReferenceOY3G_OPM_200 v7.0 for IPA1.0 © ip.access Limited 2011 Page 115
  • 123. Nr of received messages (from Mgmt & Fm): 115611.1.6 Stacks Card To select a Stacks Card, use setc 3 or setc 4 from the entry level of the CLI. ALCAP (ALCAPI0) The important commands from the help command are alcapCliHelp - Lists ALCAP CLI commands with usage ALCAP_GET_PVC_STATUS - gets the alcap Pvc status alcapCliHelp Usage: alcapCliHelp Show the commands available for this process. > alcapCliHelp traceManager list traceManager [XXX_TRACE] list traceManager [XXX_TRACE] tracing on traceManager [XXX_TRACE] tracing off ALCAP_SET_TRACE_LEVEL <traceLevel> <traceFlag> ALCAP_GET_PVC_STATUS <deviceId> The output shows what arguments need to be passed into the ALCAP_GET_PVC_STATUS command. ALCAP_GET_PVC_STATUS Usage: ALCAP_GET_PVC_STATUS <deviceId> Run this command with a valid instance identifier to display the PVC information: > ALCAP_GET_PVC_STATUS 0 Search ForDevice Id [1287], pathId 901116101 aniId 13878010 erq_timer_val 30 rel_timer_val 30 local_blocking_state 2 remote_blocking_state 3 ownership 0 sap_id 135773560 reset_sap 135774588 reset_sap_id 0 Command Successfully executed Running this command with an invalid instance will display a failed search report: > ALCAP_GET_PVC_STATUS 2 Search ForDevice Id [132359] Failed The Whole List is: pathId= 901116101 aniId= 13878010 deviceId = 1287 pathId= 901116102 aniId= 13878010 deviceId = 66823Oyster 3G AC Operations Manual CLI ReferenceOY3G_OPM_200 v7.0 for IPA1.0 © ip.access Limited 2011 Page 116
  • 124. End of LinkList Command Successfully executed Note: Use the Management Proxy component for ALCAP devices to identify the list of known instances. MTP3B (Mtp3B_SCCPI0) The important commands from the list are mtp3CliHelp - Lists Mtp3B_SCCP CLI commands with usage mtp3CliManager - Mtp3 Trace Handler mtp3CliHelp Usage: mtp3CliHelp Show the commands available for this process. > mtp3CliHelp traceManager list traceManager [XXX_TRACE] list traceManager [XXX_TRACE] tracing on traceManager [XXX_TRACE] tracing off mtp3CliManager MTP3_GET_DPC_STATUS mtp3CliManager MTP3_GET_LINK_STATUS mtp3CliManager MTP3_GET_ROUTE_STATUS mtp3CliManager MTP3_GET_ALL_TRACE_INFO mtp3CliManager MTP3_GET_CURR_TRACE_LEVEL mtp3CliManager MTP3_SET_TRACE_LEVEL <traceFlag> <traceLevel> mtp3CliManager SCCP_GET_ALL_TRACE_INFO mtp3CliManager SCCP_GET_CURR_TRACE_LEVEL mtp3CliManager SCCP_SET_TRACE_LEVEL <traceFlag> <traceLevel> mtp3CliManager This command has several arguments to gather configuration status for this process. Run this command with MTP3_GET_DPC_STATUS to display the status of the Destination Point Codes. > mtp3CliManager MTP3_GET_DPC_STATUS DPC 0 STATUS :: MTP3_SP_ACCESSIBLE DPC 1 STATUS :: MTP3_SP_ACCESSIBLE DPC 2 STATUS :: MTP3_SP_ACCESSIBLE DPC 3 STATUS :: MTP3_SP_ACCESSIBLE Run this command with MTP3_GET_LINK_STATUS to display the status of the Mtp3 Links. > mtp3CliManager MTP3_GET_LINK_STATUS LINK 0 STATUS :: LINK:AVAILABLE & INS LINK 1 STATUS :: LINK:AVAILABLE & INS LINK 2 STATUS :: LINK:AVAILABLE & INS LINK 3 STATUS :: LINK:AVAILABLE & INS LINK 4 STATUS :: LINK:AVAILABLE & INS LINK 5 STATUS :: LINK:AVAILABLE & INS LINK 6 STATUS :: LINK:AVAILABLE & INS LINK 7 STATUS :: LINK:AVAILABLE & INSOyster 3G AC Operations Manual CLI ReferenceOY3G_OPM_200 v7.0 for IPA1.0 © ip.access Limited 2011 Page 117
  • 125. Run this command with MTP3_GET_ROUTE_STATUS to display the status of the Mtp3 Routes. > mtp3CliManager MTP3_GET_ROUTE_STATUS MTP3_ROUTE 0 STATUS :: MTP3_ROUTE_AVAILABLE MTP3_ROUTE 1 STATUS :: MTP3_ROUTE_AVAILABLE MTP3_ROUTE 2 STATUS :: MTP3_ROUTE_AVAILABLE MTP3_ROUTE 3 STATUS :: MTP3_ROUTE_AVAILABLE MTP3_ROUTE 4 STATUS :: MTP3_ROUTE_AVAILABLE11.1.7 Call Control Card To select a Call Control Card, use setc 5 or setc 6 from the entry level of the CLI. UECCC (UECCCI0) The important commands from the help command at this level are uecccCliHelp - Lists UECCC CLI commands with usage printCNStatus - Print CN Domain Status getUeByImsi - Print a UEs details pertaining to a particular IMSI getAllUes <fileName> - Print all UEs details in a file getUesBy3gapId - Print all those UEs details pertaining to a particular 3gap Id displayApdr - display APDR BDB records [-a[apid] -i[imsi]] default display all uecccCliHelp Usage: uecccCliHelp Show the usage assistance for this process. > uecccCliHelp traceManager list traceManager [XXX_TRACE] list traceManager [XXX_TRACE] tracing on traceManager [XXX_TRACE] tracing off printCNStatus getUeByImsi <imsi> getUesBy3gapId <apId> getAllUes <fileName> printCNStatus Usage: printCNStatus Show the status of the Core Network domains. > printCNStatus CSCN Peer State - PEER_STATE_ACTIVE PSCN Peer State - PEER_STATE_ACTIVEOyster 3G AC Operations Manual CLI ReferenceOY3G_OPM_200 v7.0 for IPA1.0 © ip.access Limited 2011 Page 118
  • 126. getUeByImsi Usage: getueByImsi <imsi> Run this command with an IMSI as the argument to display all the UE context information. Note: This command does not work when the system is configured for open access (No ACL). getAllUes Usage: getAllUes <filename> Run this command with an existing file name to dump all the UE related information for all APs into the specified file. getUesBy3gapId Usage: getUesBy3gapId <apId> Display all the UE context information for the specified AP. > getUesBy3gapId 134 UE list under AP : 134 UE context - 0x300ec UE state : UE_STATE_ACTIVE AP ID : 0x134 Procedures Ongoing : () CS Iu details : CS Iu state : IU_ACTIVE CS RABs established : 1 Procedures onging : () PS Iu details : PS Iu state : IU_ACTIVE PS RABs established : 1 Procedures onging : () displayApdr This command has all the same features as described in the AP Controller section. UMR The important commands from the help command at this level are umrCliHelp - Lists UMR CLI commands with usage umrCliManager - umrCliManager umrCliHelp Usage: umrCliHelp Run this command to show the usage assistance for this process. > umrCliHelp traceManager listOyster 3G AC Operations Manual CLI ReferenceOY3G_OPM_200 v7.0 for IPA1.0 © ip.access Limited 2011 Page 119
  • 127. traceManager [XXX_TRACE] list traceManager [XXX_TRACE] tracing on traceManager [XXX_TRACE] tracing off umrCliManager UMR_GET_MF_LINK_STATUS umrCliManager UMR_GET_ALL_ACTIVE_AP_LINKS umrCliManager UMR_GET_AP_LINK_STATUS <apId> umrCliManager UMR_SET_TRACE_LEVEL <traceLevel> <traceFlag> umrCliManager This command has several arguments to gather configuration status for this process. Run this command with UMR_GET_MF_LINK_STATUS to show the status of all the SOIP links between UMR and the AMC-7211s. > umrCliManager UMR_GET_MF_LINK_STATUS MF 0 LINK STATUS :: UMR_SOIP_CONN_ACTIVE_STREAM_ACTIVE MF 1 LINK STATUS :: UMR_SOIP_CONN_FREE Run this command with UMR_GET_ALL_ACTIVE_AP_LINKS to display a list of all APs that are connected to the AC and a total count of all APs. > umrCliManager UMR_GET_ALL_ACTIVE_AP_LINKS ACTIVE 3GAP Ids: 623, 2361, 10008, ACTIVE 3GAP COUNT: 3 Run this command with UMR_GET_AP_LINK_STATUS to display connection details for the specified AP Identifier > umrCliManager UMR_GET_AP_LINK_STATUS 623 UMR_3GAP_CONN_ACTIVE Paging The important commands from the help command at this level are displayApdr - display APDR BDB records displayApdr This command has all the same features as described in the AP Controller section. Trum The important commands from the help command at this level are trumCliHelp - Lists TRUM CLI commands with usage trumCliManager - Trum CLI Handler trumCliHelp Usage: trumCliHelp Run this command to show the usage assistance for this process.Oyster 3G AC Operations Manual CLI ReferenceOY3G_OPM_200 v7.0 for IPA1.0 © ip.access Limited 2011 Page 120
  • 128. > trumCliHelp traceManager list traceManager [XXX_TRACE] list traceManager [XXX_TRACE] tracing on traceManager [XXX_TRACE] tracing off trumCliManager TRUM_GET_RTP_SERVER_INFO <PublicUdpPort> trumCliManager TRUM_GET_AAL2_PVC_INFO <PvcId> trumCliManager TRUM_GET_AAL5_PVC_INFO <PvcId> trumCliManager TRUM_GET_ANI_STATUS <AniValue> trumCliManager Usage: trumCliManager <args> This command has several arguments to gather configuration status for this process. Run this command with TRUM_GET_RTP_SERVER_INFO to show the status of the RTP Server based on a particular public UDP Port provided (CS = 3000, PS = 5000). > trumCliManager TRUM_GET_RTP_SERVER_INFO 3000 csRtpDeviceId = [2051] allocatedRtpSessions = [0] maxSrtpSessions = [1000] publicIpAddr = [178330424] publicPortNo = [3000] privateMacAddr = [] stateIndFlag = [0] > trumCliManager TRUM_GET_RTP_SERVER_INFO 5000 psRtpDeviceId= [3075] maxBw = [104857600] allocatedBw = [15625] publicIpAddr = [178330424] publicPortNo = [5000] stateIndFlag = [0] Note: There will be some lines reporting no match and not existing as the command does a search on both CS and PS for the provided port number. This output is not shown. Run this command with TRUM_GET_AAL2_PVC_INFO to show the status of the AAL2 PVC with the provided PVC Identifier. > trumCliManager TRUM_GET_AAL2_PVC_INFO 901116101 allocCount = [0] pvcDeviceId = [1795] deviceHandler = [0] peakRate = [10000] pvcId = [901116101] maxAllocCount = [0] stateIndFlag = [0] Run this command with TRUM_GET_AAL5_PVC_INFO to show the status of the AAL5 PVC with the provided PVC Identifier. > trumCliManager TRUM_GET_AAL5_PVC_INFO 100Oyster 3G AC Operations Manual CLI ReferenceOY3G_OPM_200 v7.0 for IPA1.0 © ip.access Limited 2011 Page 121
  • 129. allocatedBw = [31250] pvcDeviceId = [2307] pvcId = [100] maxBw = [104857600] acGtpuEndPtIpAddr = [178338045] stateIndFlag = [0] Run this command with TRUM_GET_ANI_STATUS to show the status of the ANI with the provided ANI (Point Code in decimal format, usually for an MGW). > trumCliManager TRUM_GET_ANI_STATUS 13878010 freeResourceCount = [496] deviceNo = [259] if_id = [0] ani = [13878010] unblockCount = [6] stateIndFlag = [0] UPP Proxy The important commands from the help command at this level are uppCliHelp - Lists UPP CLI commands with usage uppCliManager - UPP Trace Handler uppCliHelp Usage: uppCliHelp Run this command to show the usage assistance for this process. > uppCliHelp traceManager list traceManager [XXX_TRACE] list traceManager [XXX_TRACE] tracing on traceManager [XXX_TRACE] tracing off uppCliManager UPP_GET_IAP_LINK_STATUS uppCliManager UPP_SET_TRACE_LEVEL <traceLevel> <traceFlag> uppCliManager Usage: uppCliManager UPP_GET_IAP_LINK_STATUS Run this command to display the IAP link status. > uppCliManager UPP_GET_IAP_LINK_STATUS IAP_SOIP_LINK_STATUS_AVAILABLE for connectionId = [1] and iapModuleId = [1] Iu Controller (IuControllerI0) The important commands from the help command at this level are: listIuBoardInfo - List Iu Board Information. listOptInfo - List the Optical inst(SONET). listPvcInfo - List the PVC info. getPvcStatistics - List the Statistics on the PVC info. getAal2ChannelStatistics - List the Statistics on the PVC info.Oyster 3G AC Operations Manual CLI ReferenceOY3G_OPM_200 v7.0 for IPA1.0 © ip.access Limited 2011 Page 122
  • 130. getGtpuTunnelStatistics - List the Statistics on the PVC info. getApsStatus - List the Aps information. The key argument types for this level are: IuBoardDevInst-iSPAN Board Instance [0 … X] OptDevInst- Optical Port Instance [0 … Y] PvcId - PVC Instance [N/A] Where X depends on the number of ATM interface cards and Y depends on the number of optical ports in use. listIuBoardInfo Usage: listIuBoardInfo [IuBoardDevInst] Running this command without any arguments will typically result in: > listIuBoardInfo DeviceInstance BoardId IpAddress PortNo DeviceStatus 0 0 192.168.16.144 2000 DEVICE_ON 1 1 192.168.16.148 2000 DEVICE_ON 2 2 192.168.16.160 2000 DEVICE_ON 3 3 192.168.16.164 2000 DEVICE_ON 4 4 192.168.16.176 2000 DEVICE_ON 5 5 192.168.16.180 2000 DEVICE_ON Run the command with a single Iu Board instance to only output information relating to that card. > listIuBoardInfo 0 DeviceInstance BoardId IpAddress PortNo DeviceStatus 0 0 192.168.16.144 2000 DEVICE_ON listOptInfo Usage: listOptInfo [IuBoardDevInst [OptDevInst]] Running this command without an argument will list all optical ports on all iSPAN cards. > listOptInfo Optical interface on Board Id :- 0 DeviceInstance SonetPortNo mSonetType FrameType DeviceStatus AddInfo 0 0 3 SONET DEVICE_ON Working Port 1 1 3 SONET DEVICE_ON Working Port Optical interface on Board Id :- 1 DeviceInstance SonetPortNo mSonetType FrameType DeviceStatus AddInfo 2 0 3 SONET DEVICE_ON Working Port 3 1 3 SONET DEVICE_ON Working Port Provide an iSPAN board instance to show only the information relating to that iSPAN:Oyster 3G AC Operations Manual CLI ReferenceOY3G_OPM_200 v7.0 for IPA1.0 © ip.access Limited 2011 Page 123
  • 131. > listOptInfo 0 Optical interface on Board Id :- 0 DeviceInstance SonetPortNo mSonetType FrameType DeviceStatus AddInfo 0 0 3 SONET DEVICE_ON Working Port 1 1 3 SONET DEVICE_ON Working Port Also enter the Optical port device instance to further narrow down the output: > listOptInfo 0 0 Optical interface on Board Id :- 0 DeviceInstance SonetPortNo mSonetType FrameType DeviceStatus AddInfo 0 0 3 SONET DEVICE_ON Working Port listPvcInfo Usage: listPvcInfo IuBoardDevInst [OptDevInst [PvcId]] Running this command without any arguments will display the usage requirements. Running this command with an iSPAN card device instance will display the configured PVC’s on all optical ports active on this card. > listPvcInfo 0 PVC(s) on the Optical interface 0 DeviceInstance AALType DeviceType PvcId VPI VCI DeviceStatus 0 AAL5 Signal 1 11 51 DEVICE_ON 1 AAL5 Signal 2 11 52 DEVICE_ON 4 AAL5 Signal 5 211 32 DEVICE_ON 6 AAL5 Signal 7 211 34 DEVICE_ON 0 AAL5 PS 100 211 80 DEVICE_ON 0 AAL2 CS 901116101 16 101 DEVICE_ON 1 AAL2 CS 901116102 16 102 DEVICE_ON Optical interface 1 is an protected port(APS group) Enter the Optical port device instance to display only the PVC’s on a particular optical port: > getPvcStatistics 1 0 VPI ID VCI ID PVC ID AAL TYPE Rx frames Tx frames Error(s) 11 51 1 AAL5 1861792 1861150 No error on PVC 11 52 2 AAL5 1861842 1861048 No error on PVC 211 32 5 AAL5 1361215 1364208 No error on PVC 211 34 7 AAL5 1416210 1415267 No error on PVC 211 80 100 AAL5 0 0 No error on PVC 16 101 901116101 AAL2 131562 67342 CPS/Unsupported CID 16 102 901116102 AAL2 132299 66371 CPS/Unsupported CID Add the PVC Id to show only the configuration for that individual PVC: > getPvcStatistics 1 0 1Oyster 3G AC Operations Manual CLI ReferenceOY3G_OPM_200 v7.0 for IPA1.0 © ip.access Limited 2011 Page 124
  • 132. VPI ID VCI ID PVC ID AAL TYPE Rx frames Tx frames Error(s) 11 51 1 AAL5 1861792 1861150 No error on PVC getPvcStatistics Usage: getPvcStatistics IuBoardDevInst [OptDevInst [PvcId]] Running this command without any arguments will display the usage requirements. Running this command with an iSPAN card device instance will show the PVC stats for all the optical ports configured. > getPvcStatistics 0 PVC(s) on Sonet Port No - 0 VPI ID VCI ID PVC ID AAL TYPE Rx frames Tx frames Error(s) 11 51 1 AAL5 1861147 1860505 No error on PVC 11 52 2 AAL5 1861200 1860406 No error on PVC 211 32 5 AAL5 1360745 1363737 No error on PVC 211 34 7 AAL5 1415721 1414778 No error on PVC 211 80 100 AAL5 0 0 No error on PVC 16 101 901116101 AAL2 131562 67342 CPS/Unsupported CID 16 102 901116102 AAL2 132299 66371 CPS/Unsupported CID PVC(s) on Sonet Port No - 1 AAL Pvc does not exit Enter the Optical port device instance to display only the PVC’s on a particular optical port: > getPvcStatistics 0 0 VPI ID VCI ID PVC ID AAL TYPE Rx frames Tx frames Error(s) 11 51 1 AAL5 4637541 4636843 No error on PVC 11 52 2 AAL5 4637626 4636460 No error on PVC 211 32 5 AAL5 3387329 3390962 No error on PVC 211 34 7 AAL5 3526141 3524995 No error on PVC 211 80 100 AAL5 0 0 No error on PVC 16 101 901116101 AAL2 177741 90364 CPS/Unsupported CID 16 102 901116102 AAL2 140788 72566 CPS/Unsupported CID Also provide the PVC Id to show only the configuration for that individual PVC: > getPvcStatistics 0 0 2 VPI ID VCI ID PVC ID AAL TYPE Rx frames Tx frames Error(s) 11 52 2 AAL5 4637688 4636522 No error on PVC Note: Due to a design limitation any errors that appear will remain until either a new error type is raised or the PVCs are recreated. getAal2ChannelStatistics Usage: getAal2ChannelStatistics IuBoardDevInst [OptDevInst [PvcId]]Oyster 3G AC Operations Manual CLI ReferenceOY3G_OPM_200 v7.0 for IPA1.0 © ip.access Limited 2011 Page 125
  • 133. Running this command with an iSPAN card device instance will display the AAL2 statistics on all optical ports active on this card. > getAal2ChannelStatistics 0 PVC(s) on Sonet Port No - 0 VPI ID :- 16 VCI ID :- 101 PVC ID :- 901116101 CID Rx frames Tx frames Error 8 35688 16943 T0 UDP -No Error/FROM UDP -No Error VPI ID :- 16 VCI ID :- 102 PVC ID :- 901116102 No Channels has been creaded inside this PVC PVC(s) on Sonet Port No - 1 AAL Pvc does not exit Enter the Optical port device instance to display only the AAL2 statistics on a particular optical port: > getAal2ChannelStatistics 0 0 VPI ID :- 16 VCI ID :- 101 PVC ID :- 901116101 CID Rx frames Tx frames Error 8 40193 19135 T0 UDP -No Error/FROM UDP -No Error VPI ID :- 16 VCI ID :- 102 PVC ID :- 901116102 No Channels has been creaded inside this PVC Also provide the PVC Id to show only the statistics for that individual PVC: > getAal2ChannelStatistics 0 0 901116101 VPI ID :- 16 VCI ID :- 101 PVC ID :- 901116101 CID Rx frames Tx frames Error 8 40891 19784 T0 UDP -No Error/FROM UDP -No Error getGtpuTunnelStatistics Usage: getGtpuTunnelStatistics IuBoardDevInst [OptDevInst [PvcId]] Run this command with an iSPAN card device instance to display the GTPu statistics on all optical ports active on this card. > getGtpuTunnelStatistics 0 PVC(s) on Sonet Port No - 0 VPI ID :- 211 VCI ID :- 80 PVC ID :- 100 TunnelId Rx frames Tx frames Error 191086 0 0 From GTPU - No Error/To GTPU - No ErrorOyster 3G AC Operations Manual CLI ReferenceOY3G_OPM_200 v7.0 for IPA1.0 © ip.access Limited 2011 Page 126
  • 134. 193787 178 224 From GTPU - No Error/To GTPU - No Error PVC(s) on Sonet Port No - 1 AAL Pvc does not exit Enter the Optical port device instance to display only the GTPu statistics on a particular optical port: > getGtpuTunnelStatistics 0 0 VPI ID :- 211 VCI ID :- 80 PVC ID :- 100 TunnelId Rx frames Tx frames Error 191086 0 0 From GTPU - No Error/To GTPU - No Error 193787 178 224 From GTPU - No Error/To GTPU - No Error Also provide the PVC Id to show only the statistics for that individual PVC: > getGtpuTunnelStatistics 0 0 100 VPI ID :- 211 VCI ID :- 80 PVC ID :- 100 TunnelId Rx frames Tx frames Error 191086 0 0 From GTPU - No Error/To GTPU - No Error 193787 178 224 From GTPU - No Error/To GTPU - No Error getApsStatus Usage: getApsStatus [ApsDeviceInstance] Run this command without any arguments to show all APS groups for the entire AC: > getApsStatus DevInst ApsType ProBoardInst ProPortNo WorkBoardInst WorkPortNo Direction ActivePort Status 0 1P1 0 1 0 0 Bidirectional Working APS group is operational (Configured) 1 1P1 1 1 1 0 Bidirectional Working APS group is operational (Configured) Run this command with an APS device instance tol show only that APS group information. > getApsStatus 0 DevInst ApsType ProBoardInst ProPortNo WorkBoardInst WorkPortNo Direction ActivePort Status 0 1P1 0 1 0 0 Bidirectional Protection APS group is operational (Configured)Oyster 3G AC Operations Manual CLI ReferenceOY3G_OPM_200 v7.0 for IPA1.0 © ip.access Limited 2011 Page 127
  • 135. 11.1.8 Management Proxy Each ip.access application running on the AC requires a Management Proxy to provide configuration. First select the required card with setc <slot>, then select the Management Proxy with setc <proxy_instance>. See the table in section 4.2 for the Management Proxy instances. For example, to select the ATM Management Proxy on the Slot 2 Management Card: > setc 2 > setc MgmtProxyATMI1 The CLI can display what processes are running and the state of each process. The key commands in the list command are: listAppStatus - List of all Appl listDeviceStatus - List all device in Appl listAppStatus Usage: listAppStatus [ApplicationName] Run this command without any argument to display only the processes that are configured: > listAppStatus Application Name Inst Status ---------------- ---- ------ alcapAp 0 ALL::CONFIGURED Mtp3bAp 0 ALL::CONFIGURED RanapAp 0 ALL::CONFIGURED Run this command with an Application name to show the status of that application only. For example: > listAppStatus alcapAp Application Name Inst Status ---------------- ---- ------ alcapAp 0 ALL::CONFIGURED listDeviceStatus Usage: listDeviceStatus ApplName [DeviceType] Run this command with an application name (from the listAppStatus) to display all the relevant devices and their configured states: > listDeviceStatus alcapAp Device Index Application Name Device Type Instance State 1 alcapAp AlcapConfig 0 ALL::CONFIGURED::IDLE 2 alcapAp StcConfig 0 ALL::CONFIGURED::IDLE 3 alcapAp Ani 0 ALL::CONFIGURED::IDLE 4 alcapAp MscA2eaAddr 0 ALL::CONFIGURED::IDLE 5 alcapAp Aal2Path 0 ALL::CONFIGURED::IDLE 6 alcapAp Aal2Path 1 ALL::CONFIGURED::IDLE 7 alcapAp AlcapTimer 0 ALL::CONFIGURED::IDLEOyster 3G AC Operations Manual CLI ReferenceOY3G_OPM_200 v7.0 for IPA1.0 © ip.access Limited 2011 Page 128
  • 136. 11.2 iSPAN 3650 CLI The iSPAN CLI is a simple command line interface to gather information relating to the ATM card (Interphase 3650)11.2.1 Start the CLI 1) To start the iSPAN CLI, telnet to the iSPAN private IP address: # telnet 192.168.16.144 This is the IP address for the iSPAN 3650 in Bay 1 of the Carrier Card in Slot 9. Refer to the following table for the other IP addresses: Slot 9 Slot 10 Bay 1 192.168.16.144 192.168.16.160 Bay 2 192.168.16.148 192.168.16.164 Successful login will produce this output: Trying 192.168.16.144... Connected to 192.168.16.144. Escape character is ^]. Management software version 7.2.6 Copyright Interphase Corporation 2003-2009 (c) .****************. .****************. .**********. .*****************. .************. .********************. .*************** ************************. .******************. .****************************..************************. ****************************. .*************************. ***********************. .***********************. *********************. . .************************. ********************. **.. .************************* ************************* .************************** ************************ .**************************. **********************. .**************************. ********************. .**************************. .*****************. .*** .********************. **************** .*. .*******************. *************. .*******************. .*********. ..******************. .******************************. .****************. iSPAN-9-0$Oyster 3G AC Operations Manual CLI ReferenceOY3G_OPM_200 v7.0 for IPA1.0 © ip.access Limited 2011 Page 129
  • 137. 11.2.2 Using the CLI The iSPAN CLI is a single command execution / response mechanism. There is a built in command history using the up and down arrow keys. A limitation exists with the Left arrow key, such that it removes characters from the command string as they are passed by the cursor.11.2.3 Exit the CLI 1) To finish the iSPAN CLI session, type logout and press <Enter>: # logout End of session... iSPAN-9-0$ Connection closed by foreign host.11.2.4 ATM Commands Optical Interface The usage requirements for this command is show controller sonnet <optical port number> To determine the configuration for a optical interface port 0, the following command. iSPAN-9-0$ show controller sonet 0 Controller name : sonet 0 Controller type : OC3 Medium type : FINISAR FTLF1323P1BTR Rev A - OC3 Single Mode Intermediate Reach LC clock source : line sdh : no uni : no coset : yes scrambling : yes port status : active Virtual Circuits Usage: show interface atm <optical port number> pvc <VPI/VCI> To display all the PVC’s configured on a optical port 0 run the following command: iSPAN-9-0$ show interface atm 0 Port : 0 Maximum throughput : 353207 cells/sec Reserved throughput : 30400 cells/sec VPI VCI CLASS NAME 11 51 -> Router router udp 11 52 -> Router router udp 16 101 16 102 211 32 -> Router router udp 211 34 -> Router router udp 211 80 To display the specifics of a single PVC, run the command with a pvc option:Oyster 3G AC Operations Manual CLI ReferenceOY3G_OPM_200 v7.0 for IPA1.0 © ip.access Limited 2011 Page 130
  • 138. iSPAN-9-0$ show interface atm 0 pvc 11/51 VPI : 11 VCI : 51 Encapsulation : aal5mux-none Quality Of Service: CBR Cell rate : 4800 cells/s CDVT : 10 * 10 ns oam : off MTU : 1536 Tx queue size : 16 router-group : router udp Statistics : enabled Statistics Usage: show interface atm <optical port number> pvc <VPI/VCI> stats To display the current statistics (if enabled in configuration) for a PVC then run this command iSPAN-9-0$ show interface atm 0 pvc 11/51 stats Rx Host frames : 0 Rx Iw frames : 6604208 Aborted frames : 0 Clp frames : 0 Rx Cells : 6606862 Errors CRC : 0 CPI : 0 size : 0 RAS : 0 underflow : 0 max SDU : 0 Iw max MRU : 0 Iw underrun : 0 Tx frames : 6603719 Tx Cells : 6604169 Protection Usage: show failover <failover group name> Run this command without a <failover group name> to display all configured groups: iSPAN-9-0$ show failover Failover groups: SONET01 Run this command with a valid failover group name to display the configuration for that group: iSPAN-9-0$ show failover SONET01 Failover name : SONET01 Type : sonet Protocol : 1+1 Revertive mode : no Status : Released Running protocol : 1+1 - running direction : bidirectionalOyster 3G AC Operations Manual CLI ReferenceOY3G_OPM_200 v7.0 for IPA1.0 © ip.access Limited 2011 Page 131
  • 139. Protection channel : port 1 Working channel : port 0 Status : Not switched11.2.5 Ethernet Commands Configuration Usage: show interface Ethernet <Ethernet port instance> Run this command to look at the first Ethernet port and display the following: iSPAN-9-0$ show interface ethernet 0 Interface name : ethernet 0 MAC address : 000077b3671d Connector : AMC autoneg : ON Tx queue size : 16 ether-type : v2 MTU : 1500 IP router : router IP address : 192.168.16.144 IP mask : 255.255.255.0 Statistics : enabled port status : active - speed 1000 Mbps - full duplex Statistics Usage: show interface Ethernet <Ethernet port instance> stats Run this command with the stats argument to display the statistics for the first Ethernet port: iSPAN-9-0$ show interface ethernet 0 stats Rx frames : 135875733 Rx bytes : 10411877482 Rx broadcasts : 49567629 Rx multicasts : 9097735 Rx fragments : 0 Rx host : 614000 Rx interworking : 135220713 Rx dropped : 0 Rx jabber : 0 Rx false carrier : 0 Rx MAC control : 0 Rx MAC pause : 0 Rx MAC unknown : 0 Rx oversize : 0 Rx undersize : 0 Rx errors Alignment : 0 Code : 0 FCS : 0 Length : 0 MRU exceeded : 0 Overrun : 0 Max SDU : 0 MAC address : 1 IW overrun : 0Oyster 3G AC Operations Manual CLI ReferenceOY3G_OPM_200 v7.0 for IPA1.0 © ip.access Limited 2011 Page 132
  • 140. FIFO overrun : 41019 Tx frames : 78097916 Tx packets : 78097916 Tx bytes : 5170027706 Tx broadcasts : 10509 Tx multicasts : 0 Tx fragments : 0 Tx control frames : 0 Tx defer : 0 Tx dropped : 0 Tx jabber : 0 Tx MAC pause : 0 Tx MAC paused : 0 Tx no collision : 0 Tx single collision : 0 Tx multi collision : 0 Tx oversize : 0 Tx undersize : 0 Tx errors FCS : 0 Underrun : 0 Excess defer : 0 Excess collision: 0 Late collision : 0 Rx/Tx frames lengthes 64 bytes : 206562474 65-127 bytes : 5795538 128-255 bytes : 8551 256-511 bytes : 3904 512-1023 bytes : 741636 1024-1518 bytes : 861546 1519-1522 bytes : 0Oyster 3G AC Operations Manual CLI ReferenceOY3G_OPM_200 v7.0 for IPA1.0 © ip.access Limited 2011 Page 133

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