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The Impacts of

BULLYING:
what we know
and

what we can do

Keynote Sharlene Chadwick
No2Bullying Conference | 22-23 May 2...
Bullying behaviours


Learned from our interactions and experiences



Relationship issue therefore needs a relationship...
Types
Face to face (direct)

Covert (indirect)
Cyberbullying
Cyberbullying

Differs from f2f



Abusive texts and emails



Sense of anonymity



Posting messages or images



24/...
Statistics and facts

1:4
students bullied
each week

FREE
ACCESS

20%
cyberbullied – not observed
or reported to adults

...
Issues for young people online


Cyberbullying



Selfies



Digital reputation



Digital citizenship
bystander

>

 Increased use of tobacco, alcohol and other
drugs

 Increase mental health problems –
depression and anxi...
Long term consequences


people who were bullied in childhood are 4 times
more likely to have an anxiety disorder as adul...
People who engage in bullying


Feel disconnected



Less friendly and cooperative



Level of peer acceptance but are ...
People who are bullied


Feel disconnected



High levels of emotionality



Less well acceptance by peers



Low self...
Protective factors
Social connectedness is particularly important for those students
who aren’t connected to highly resili...
Increase the range of

protective factors by:
Teaching young people social and
emotional skills
Develop empathy in young p...
be their friend

>

Showing them empathy, support and
letting them know they’re not alone

find a safe place
be a role mod...
values education

Approaches

method of shared concerned
positive behaviour support
intervention and prevention programs
p...
Approaches
Engaging young people
in school activities
and decision making

Enhancement of

physical
environment

Professio...
Contact details

Sharlene Chadwick
@sharlenechadwic
Sharlene Chadwick
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No 2 Bullying Conference Australia 2013. Impacts of bullying, what we know and what we can do.

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Keynote address. No 2 Bullying Conference, Australia 2013. Impacts of Bullying: what we know and what we can do. Sharlene Chadwick

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Transcript of "No 2 Bullying Conference Australia 2013. Impacts of bullying, what we know and what we can do. "

  1. 1. The Impacts of BULLYING: what we know and what we can do Keynote Sharlene Chadwick No2Bullying Conference | 22-23 May 2013 | Gold Coast Australian and New Zealand Mental Health Association
  2. 2. Bullying behaviours  Learned from our interactions and experiences  Relationship issue therefore needs a relationship solution  Complex social issue requires integrated response
  3. 3. Types Face to face (direct) Covert (indirect) Cyberbullying
  4. 4. Cyberbullying Differs from f2f  Abusive texts and emails  Sense of anonymity  Posting messages or images  24/7 and invasive  Imitating and excluding online  Potential for large audience  Inappropriate image tagging  Internet never forgets
  5. 5. Statistics and facts 1:4 students bullied each week FREE ACCESS 20% cyberbullied – not observed or reported to adults 85% 32% are bystanders parents stop supervising internet useage from the age 11 22% 10-17 bullied online years old spend 2 hours online every day – home most common place
  6. 6. Issues for young people online  Cyberbullying  Selfies  Digital reputation  Digital citizenship
  7. 7. bystander >  Increased use of tobacco, alcohol and other drugs  Increase mental health problems – depression and anxiety  Miss or skip school/work person bullying >  Abuse alcohol and other drugs  Instigate fights and vandalise property  Engage in early sexual activity  Criminal convictions and traffic offences  Abusive towards partners and children person being bullied >  Depression and anxiety  Increased feeling of sadness and loneliness  Changes in sleep and eating patterns  Loss of interest in activities  Health complaints  Decreased academic achievement and school participation
  8. 8. Long term consequences  people who were bullied in childhood are 4 times more likely to have an anxiety disorder as adults  bullies who were also bullied are 14.5 times more likely to develop panic disorder as adults and 4.8 times more likely to experience depression  men who were both bullies and bullied were 18.5 times more likely to have had suicidal thoughts  women who were both bullies and bullied were 26.7 times more likely to develop agoraphobia  bullies who were not bullied were 4.1 times more likely to have anti-social personality disorder  boys who are bullies and bullied are likely to suffer from mental health issues when they reach adulthood (Bradshaw 2013 n:1420)
  9. 9. People who engage in bullying  Feel disconnected  Less friendly and cooperative  Level of peer acceptance but are disliked  High self esteem  Lower levels of empathy
  10. 10. People who are bullied  Feel disconnected  High levels of emotionality  Less well acceptance by peers  Low self esteem  Non assertive and socially withdraw  Lack confidence and skills in social interactions
  11. 11. Protective factors Social connectedness is particularly important for those students who aren’t connected to highly resilient families.
  12. 12. Increase the range of protective factors by: Teaching young people social and emotional skills Develop empathy in young people Fostering positive relationships with peers, teachers and other adults Encouraging help seeking behaviour Teaching young people knowledge Protective factors and skills to engage in a positive way with the digital world Social connectedness is particularly important for those students who aren’t connected to highly resilient families.
  13. 13. be their friend > Showing them empathy, support and letting them know they’re not alone find a safe place be a role model > Bullying is not ok and we need to demonstrate positive ways of behaving and interacting with each other > Help the person move to a safe place when the bullying may stop tell a trusted adult > Adults can intervene or stop it when it’s occurring or validate the person being bullied by listening don’t be a spectator > The behaviour is encouraged by an audience or laughing. Let the bully know what they are doing is not ok.
  14. 14. values education Approaches method of shared concerned positive behaviour support intervention and prevention programs policies and procedures leadership commitment restorative practices whole-school redesign social interactions focus on student wellbeing targeted support promote positive peer interactions school culture and ethos
  15. 15. Approaches Engaging young people in school activities and decision making Enhancement of physical environment Professional development Counselling for individuals Parent Partnerships Positive and respectful peer-teacher; peer-peer and teacher-teacher relationships are maintained
  16. 16. Contact details Sharlene Chadwick @sharlenechadwic Sharlene Chadwick
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