IP Addressing          byMd. Abdullah Al Mamun     Sr. Lecturer
Layer 3 - IP datagramVersion     IHL       Type of Service                     Total Length             Identification    ...
Purpose of an IP address   Unique   Identification of    – Source      Sometimes used for security or policy-based      f...
Purpose of an IP Address   identifiesa machine’s connection to a network   physically moving a machine from one network ...
Basic Structure of an IP Address  32 bit number (4 octet number):   (e.g. 133.27.162.125)  Decimal Representation:      ...
Address Structure Revisited   Hierarchical     Division in IP Address:    – Network Part (Prefix)       » describes which...
Network Masks   Define which bits are used to describe the    Network Part and which for hosts   Different Representatio...
Example Prefixes 137.158.128.0/17 (netmask 255.255.128.0)        1111 1111 1111 1111 1 000 0000 0000 0000        1000 100...
Special Addresses   All   0’s in host part: Represents Network    – e.g. 193.0.0.0/24    – e.g. 138.37.128.0/17   All   ...
Allocating IP Addresses   The subnet mask is used to define size of a    network   E.g a subnet mask of 255.255.255.0 or...
Old-style classes of IP addresses     Different classes used to represent different sizes of network      (small, medium,...
IP Addressesgiven notion of “network”, let’s re-examine IP addresses:“class-full” addressing:   class                     ...
Old-style classes of IP addresses   Just   look at the address to tell what class it is.     – Class A: 0.0.0.0 to 127.25...
Implied netmasks of classfuladdresses  A  classful network has a “natural” or “implied”    prefix length or netmask:    –...
Classless addressing   Forget  old Class A, Class B, Class C    terminology and restrictions   Internet routing and addr...
Classless Addressing   IP address with the subnet mask defines the    range of addresses in the block    – E.g 10.1.1.32/...
Classless addressing example  A   large ISP gets a large block of addresses    – e.g., a /16 prefix, or 65536 separate ad...
Classless addressing exercise   Consider the address block 133.27.162.0/23   Allocate 8 separate /29 blocks, and one /28...
IP addressing: the last word...    Q: How does an ISP get block of addresses?    A: ICANN: Internet Corporation for Assign...
IP Addressing: scenario                                                  223.1.1.1   IP address: 32-bit identifier    for...
IP Addressing : scenario                                       223.1.1.1   IP address:     – network part                ...
Getting a datagram from source to dest.                                                routing table in AIP datagram:     ...
Getting a datagram from source to dest.misc                                              Dest. Net. next router Nhops     ...
Getting a datagram from source to dest.misc                                             Dest. Net. next router Nhops      ...
Getting a datagram from source to dest.                                            Dest.   next misc                      ...
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Ip addressing by_Mamun sir

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This a Class Lecture Sheet on Networking Class. Mamun Sir is the Lecturer of that class. Which was held in Atish Dipankar Uninersity.

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Ip addressing by_Mamun sir

  1. 1. IP Addressing byMd. Abdullah Al Mamun Sr. Lecturer
  2. 2. Layer 3 - IP datagramVersion IHL Type of Service Total Length Identification Flags Fragment Offset Time to Live Protocol Header Checksum Source Address Destination Address Options Padding Data  Version = 4  Protocol = 6 means data  If no options, IHL = 5 portion contains a TCP  Source and Destination segment. Protocol = 17 are 32-bit IP addresses means UDP.
  3. 3. Purpose of an IP address  Unique Identification of – Source Sometimes used for security or policy-based filtering of data – Destination So the networks know where to send the data  Network Independent Format – IP over anything
  4. 4. Purpose of an IP Address  identifiesa machine’s connection to a network  physically moving a machine from one network to another requires changing the IP address  assigned by an appropriate authority such as RIPE, ARIN, etc or Local Internet Registries (LIRs)  TCP/IP uses unique 32-bit address
  5. 5. Basic Structure of an IP Address 32 bit number (4 octet number): (e.g. 133.27.162.125) Decimal Representation: 133 27 162 125 Binary Representation: 10000101 00011011 10100010 01111101 Hexadecimal Representation: 85 1B A2 7D
  6. 6. Address Structure Revisited  Hierarchical Division in IP Address: – Network Part (Prefix) » describes which physical network – Host Part (Host Address) » describes which host on that network 205 . 154 . 8 1 11001101 10011010 00001000 00000001 Network Host – Boundary can be anywhere » very often NOT at a multiple of 8 bits
  7. 7. Network Masks  Define which bits are used to describe the Network Part and which for hosts  Different Representations: – decimal dot notation: 255.255.224.0 – binary: 11111111 11111111 11100000 00000000 – hexadecimal: 0xFFFFE000 – number of network bits: /19  BinaryAND of 32 bit IP address with 32 bit netmask yields network part of address
  8. 8. Example Prefixes 137.158.128.0/17 (netmask 255.255.128.0) 1111 1111 1111 1111 1 000 0000 0000 0000 1000 1001 1001 1110 1 000 0000 0000 0000198.134.0.0/16 (netmask 255.255.0.0) 1111 1111 1111 1111 0000 0000 0000 0000 1100 0110 1000 0110 0000 0000 0000 0000205.37.193.128/26 (netmask 255.255.255.192) 1111 1111 1111 1111 1111 1111 11 00 0000 1100 1101 0010 0101 1100 0001 10 00 0000
  9. 9. Special Addresses  All 0’s in host part: Represents Network – e.g. 193.0.0.0/24 – e.g. 138.37.128.0/17  All 1’s in host part: Broadcast – e.g. 137.156.255.255 (137.156.0.0/16) – e.g. 134.132.100.255 (134.132.100.0/24) – e.g. 190.0.127.255 (190.0.0.0/17)  127.0.0.0/8: Loopback address (127.0.0.1)  0.0.0.0: Various special purposes
  10. 10. Allocating IP Addresses  The subnet mask is used to define size of a network  E.g a subnet mask of 255.255.255.0 or /24 implies 32-24=8 host bits – 2^8 minus 2 = 254 possible hosts  Similarly a subnet mask of 255.255.255.224 or /27 implies 32-27=5 hosts bits – 2^5 minus 2 = 30 possible hosts
  11. 11. Old-style classes of IP addresses  Different classes used to represent different sizes of network (small, medium, large)  Class A networks (large): – 8 bits network, 24 bits host (/8, 255.0.0.0) – First byte in range 0-127  Class B networks (medium): – 16 bits network, 16 bits host (/16 ,255.255.0.0) – First byte in range 128-191  Class C networks (small): – 24 bits network, 8 bits host (/24, 255.255.255.0) – First byte in range 192-223
  12. 12. IP Addressesgiven notion of “network”, let’s re-examine IP addresses:“class-full” addressing: class 1.0.0.0 to A 0 network host 127.255.255.255 B 128.0.0.0 to 10 network host 191.255.255.255 192.0.0.0 to C 110 network host 223.255.255.255 224.0.0.0 to D 1110 multicast address 239.255.255.255 32 bits Network Layer #12
  13. 13. Old-style classes of IP addresses  Just look at the address to tell what class it is. – Class A: 0.0.0.0 to 127.255.255.255 » binary 0xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx – Class B: 128.0.0.0 to 191.255.255.255 » binary 10xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx – Class C: 192.0.0.0 to 223.255.255.255 » binary 110xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx – Class D: (multicast) 224.0.0.0 to 239.255.255.255 » binary 1110xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx – Class E: (reserved) 240.0.0.0 to 255.255.255.255
  14. 14. Implied netmasks of classfuladdresses A classful network has a “natural” or “implied” prefix length or netmask: – Class A: prefix length /8 (netmask 255.0.0.0) – Class B: prefix length /16 (netmask 255.255.0.0) – Class C: prefix length /24 (netmask 255.255.255.0)  Old routing systems often used implied netmasks  Modern routing systems always use explicit prefix lengths or netmasks
  15. 15. Classless addressing  Forget old Class A, Class B, Class C terminology and restrictions  Internet routing and address management today is classless  CIDR = Classless Inter-Domain Routing – routing does not assume that class A,B,C implies prefix length /8,/16,/24  VLSM = Variable-Length Subnet Masks – routing does not assume that all subnets are the same size
  16. 16. Classless Addressing  IP address with the subnet mask defines the range of addresses in the block – E.g 10.1.1.32/28 (subnet mask 255.255.255.240) defines the range 10.1.1.32 to 10.1.1.47 – 10.1.1.32 is the network address – 10.1.1.47 is the broadcast address – 10.1.1.33 ->46 assignable addresses
  17. 17. Classless addressing example A large ISP gets a large block of addresses – e.g., a /16 prefix, or 65536 separate addresses  Allocate smaller blocks to customers – e.g., a /22 prefix (1024 addresses) to one customer, and a /28 prefix (16 addresses) to another customer  An organisation that gets a /22 prefix from their ISP divides it into smaller blocks – e.g. a /26 prefix (64 addresses) for one department, and a /27 prefix (32 addresses) for another department
  18. 18. Classless addressing exercise  Consider the address block 133.27.162.0/23  Allocate 8 separate /29 blocks, and one /28 block  What are the IP addresses of each block? – in prefix length notation – netmasks in decimal – IP address ranges  What is the largest block that is still available?  What other blocks are still available?
  19. 19. IP addressing: the last word... Q: How does an ISP get block of addresses? A: ICANN: Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers – allocates addresses – manages DNS – assigns domain names, resolves disputes Network Layer #19
  20. 20. IP Addressing: scenario 223.1.1.1 IP address: 32-bit identifier for host, router interface 223.1.2.1 223.1.1.2 interface: connection 223.1.1.4 223.1.2.9 between host, router and 223.1.2.2 223.1.1.3 223.1.3.27 physical link – router’s typically have multiple interfaces – host may have multiple 223.1.3.1 223.1.3.2 interfaces – IP addresses associated with interface, not host, or router 223.1.1.1 = 11011111 00000001 00000001 00000001 223 1 1 1 Network Layer #20
  21. 21. IP Addressing : scenario 223.1.1.1 IP address: – network part 223.1.2.1 223.1.1.2 » high order bits 223.1.1.4 223.1.2.9 – host part 223.1.2.2 » low order bits 223.1.1.3 223.1.3.27 What’s a network ? (from IP LAN address perspective) 223.1.3.1 223.1.3.2 – device interfaces with same network part of IP address – can physically reach each other without intervening network consisting of 3 IP networks router (for IP addresses starting with 223, first 24 bits are network address) Network Layer #21
  22. 22. Getting a datagram from source to dest. routing table in AIP datagram: Dest. Net. next router Nhops source 223.1.1 1 misc dest fields IP addr IP addr data 223.1.2 223.1.1.4 2 223.1.3 223.1.1.4 2  datagram remains unchanged, as A 223.1.1.1 it travels source to destination 223.1.2.1  addr fields of interest here 223.1.1.2 223.1.1.4 223.1.2.9  mainly dest. IP addr B 223.1.2.2 223.1.1.3 223.1.3.27 E 223.1.3.1 223.1.3.2 Network Layer #22
  23. 23. Getting a datagram from source to dest.misc Dest. Net. next router Nhops 223.1.1.1 223.1.1.3 datafields 223.1.1 1 223.1.2 223.1.1.4 2Starting at A, given IP datagram 223.1.3 223.1.1.4 2 addressed to B: look up net. address of B A 223.1.1.1 find B is on same net. as A 223.1.2.1 link layer will send datagram directly to 223.1.1.2 B inside link-layer frame 223.1.1.4 223.1.2.9  B and A are directly connected B 223.1.2.2 223.1.1.3 223.1.3.27 E 223.1.3.1 223.1.3.2 Network Layer #23
  24. 24. Getting a datagram from source to dest.misc Dest. Net. next router Nhops 223.1.1.1 223.1.2.2 datafields 223.1.1 1 223.1.2 223.1.1.4 2Starting at A, dest. E: 223.1.3 223.1.1.4 2 look up network address of E E on different network A 223.1.1.1  A, E not directly attached 223.1.2.1 routing table: next hop router to E is 223.1.1.2 223.1.1.4 223.1.1.4 223.1.2.9 link layer sends datagram to router B 223.1.2.2 223.1.1.4 inside link-layer frame 223.1.1.3 223.1.3.27 E datagram arrives at 223.1.1.4 223.1.3.1 223.1.3.2 continued….. Network Layer #24
  25. 25. Getting a datagram from source to dest. Dest. next misc network router Nhops interface 223.1.1.1 223.1.2.2 data fields 223.1.1 - 1 223.1.1.4Arriving at 223.1.4, destined for 223.1.2 - 1 223.1.2.9 223.1.3 - 1 223.1.3.27 223.1.2.2 look up network address of E A 223.1.1.1 E on same network as router’s 223.1.2.1 interface 223.1.2.9 223.1.1.2  router, E directly attached 223.1.1.4 223.1.2.9 B link layer sends datagram to 223.1.2.2 223.1.2.2 inside link-layer frame via interface 223.1.1.3 223.1.3.27 E 223.1.2.9 223.1.3.1 223.1.3.2 datagram arrives at 223.1.2.2!!! (hooray!) Network Layer #25
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