• Share
  • Email
  • Embed
  • Like
  • Save
  • Private Content
How To Make Better Teachers
 

How To Make Better Teachers

on

  • 3,256 views

Short presentation for the 140edu State of Now conference held in New York City, July 31 and August 1, 2012

Short presentation for the 140edu State of Now conference held in New York City, July 31 and August 1, 2012

Statistics

Views

Total Views
3,256
Views on SlideShare
3,063
Embed Views
193

Actions

Likes
9
Downloads
96
Comments
1

9 Embeds 193

http://www.educacionadistanciaulsac.com 163
http://www.brijj.com 10
http://lms.asknlearn.com 8
https://si0.twimg.com 3
http://satgasredd.ipmagic.com.au 3
https://twimg0-a.akamaihd.net 2
http://www.edmodo.com 2
http://forum.jobsbd.com 1
http://dev-flippedlessons.heroku.com 1
More...

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Apple Keynote

Usage Rights

CC Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike LicenseCC Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike LicenseCC Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel

11 of 1 previous next

  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
  • nice definition

    thanks a lot
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment
  • Let me begin by saying that’s an extremely arrogant and somewhat misleading title. You can’t really make anyone do anything short of brute force and intimidation and unfortunately that’s creeping into our profession. \n\nI’d like to share a couple of ideas that are simple in some respects but that might spark some interest in pursuing or in many cases framing your current and experience work a little differently. \n\nI’ll first talk about an idea for educators and then challenge our leaders to support their efforts\n
  • Let me say that given the complexities and challenges of being an educator, we could do with a lot more humility so instead of prescribing, We need to do a better job describing. \n\nThat’s what what I hope you take from my talk and others. Hear the stories, the ideas not as prescriptions but as possibilities for you to own and pursue in your context/.\n
  • Let me say that given the complexities and challenges of being an educator, we could do with a lot more humility so instead of prescribing, We need to do a better job describing. \n\nThat’s what what I hope you take from my talk and others. Hear the stories, the ideas not as prescriptions but as possibilities for you to own and pursue in your context/.\n
  • My story begins here really, as a young 24 year old teacher, who was really excited about working with young learners and had a penchant for suspenders, it become evident to me early on this job was way to difficult to do on my own. I wasn’t smart enough nor did I own the expertise or ability to address the divergent needs of 22 6 and 7 year olds. \n\n
  • I was introduced early on in my career to the idea of being a reflective practitioner. It’s the key for anyone to improve their craft. Problem was and is, that the busyness of teaching and school is such that this is hard to come by. Efforts made to bring teachers together on any kind of regular basis rarely amount to the kind of deep reflection and sharing necessary for real growth. \n
  • The decision for me to make public and transparent my thinking and my work, immediately made me think differently about my teaching and practices\n
  • 917 posts that\n
  • these interactions, some small some, some simple words of encouragement, some incredibly insightful, many that challenge my thinking but all important have been the single best space for my personal growth and development as an educator. \n\nI can’t see any downsides. Even if you write and reflect and receive no comments, this is still the \n
  • And of course, I’m not alone. \nPossibly the best example of what a great reflective, informative teacher blog might look like is high school Math teacher Dan Meyer. I’ve literally observed Dan mature and grow as a teacher from thousands of miles away. He began as a very good teacher but I can say with a great deal of certainty he’s become a much better one, largely a result of his efforts on his blog. \n
  • Shelley Wright is a local colleague who has written perhaps the most candid story of professional transformation I’ve ever read. \nShelley definitely put herself out there, acknowledging the things she didn’t think she was doing well, the challenges of change but also the hope and possibilities she provided for her students as she transformed her classroom from a teacher centered place to one that empowered students. She gave us an inside look at how difficult but how rewarding it is to be a teacher actively pursuing greatness. \n\n\n\n\n
  • Shelley Wright is a local colleague who has written perhaps the most candid story of professional transformation I’ve ever read. \nShelley definitely put herself out there, acknowledging the things she didn’t think she was doing well, the challenges of change but also the hope and possibilities she provided for her students as she transformed her classroom from a teacher centered place to one that empowered students. She gave us an inside look at how difficult but how rewarding it is to be a teacher actively pursuing greatness. \n\n\n\n\n
  • Shelley Wright is a local colleague who has written perhaps the most candid story of professional transformation I’ve ever read. \nShelley definitely put herself out there, acknowledging the things she didn’t think she was doing well, the challenges of change but also the hope and possibilities she provided for her students as she transformed her classroom from a teacher centered place to one that empowered students. She gave us an inside look at how difficult but how rewarding it is to be a teacher actively pursuing greatness. \n\n\n\n\n
  • Shelley Wright is a local colleague who has written perhaps the most candid story of professional transformation I’ve ever read. \nShelley definitely put herself out there, acknowledging the things she didn’t think she was doing well, the challenges of change but also the hope and possibilities she provided for her students as she transformed her classroom from a teacher centered place to one that empowered students. She gave us an inside look at how difficult but how rewarding it is to be a teacher actively pursuing greatness. \n\n\n\n\n
  • A few years ago, we had the privilege of having a movie shot in our home.\n
  • We had the chance to go behind the scenes and get some insights on how difficult it is to shoot a movie. \n
  • The number of people and equipment and talent needed was pretty incredible but part of the magic of Hollywood is making the magic seamless. Making it so the average movie doesn’t think about the details and hard work involved but focuses on the end result.\n
  • We’re not magicians or movie makers trying to hide our secrets. We all know how difficult it is. At the very least we could be helping someone\n
  • We’re seeing a small portion of our teachers elevate this culture in various spaces online. It’s hard to know if this is a chicken and egg thing but we’re hearing more and more of these folks credit their growth as a professional to the sharing and reflection experienced in this spaces.\n
  • It’s not gone totally unnoticed and their is an emerging realization that this has huge potential, I dare say far more than many of the current teacher reform initiatives. \n\nAnd yet.....\n\n\n\n\n\nAnd this notion of artisans sharing their craft is precisely what we’re seeing in small ways in spaces like twitter, facebook and through their blogs. Many continue to advocate for the open, transparent sharing of practice and engaging in thoughtful, regular dialogue with colleagues and strangers being the single most important factor in them getting better as teachers. I have no hard evidence and perhaps it’s a chicken and egg thing but I’d venture to say that our best teachers are those most willing to openly reflect and share their ideas and practices with others. I’m suggesting that encouraging a culture of sharing and reflection is likely the single most important shift we can make for improving our schools. \n\nDo they have to blog or use social media to do this? Not at all. but there’s no question there are some significant affordances here that make sense for us to consider. \n\nUnfortunately, not everyone sees things this way and and in fact we’re in the middle of some disturbing trends as we it seems everyone is seeking to improve education.\n
  • As many are searching for “new and better” it’s Been interesting watching folks analyze and try to replicate their success, while it’s difficult making direct comparisons and trying to fit all facets of their system into your own, the one, often overlooked idea is their view of accountability. \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • Accountability in education becomes more important the farther you are from the classroom. \nWhat the accountability movement in education has failed to recognize the deep level of commitment that is inherent in the vast majority of educators. This is not to say we don’t have bad educators and administrators but every time you initiate a new policy or mandate under the guise of accountability you slowly take away some of the professionalism and pride that most teachers bring to the table. \n
  • Our world has become more and more afraid of more and more things and in our efforts to make sense of it all, we’ve developed a strong sense of fear and mistrust. \n
  • \n
  • a leader building trust is John Gaiptman \nHe believes in teachers working together but unlike most leaders has made it a priority\nProviding teachers with common time to work together multiple times every week on ideas and projects they find valuable and important, not ideas imposed by the district. As John says, \nAny question, is the right answer. You'll get the grant money\nHe told me that when teachers request transportation for field trips, they never have to give a reason why. If a teacher wants to take their students outside of the classroom his response isn’t to ask why but why not?\n\n\n\n
  • One example of a leader building trust is John Gaiptman \nHe believes in teachers working together but unlike most leaders has made it a priority\nProviding teachers with common time to work together multiple times every week on ideas and projects they find valuable and important, not ideas imposed by the district. As John says, \nAny question, is the right answer. You'll get the grant money\nHe told me that when teachers request transportation for field trips, they never have to give a reason why. If a teacher wants to take their students outside of the classroom his response isn’t to ask why but why not?\n\n\n\n
  • One example of a leader building trust is John Gaiptman \nHe believes in teachers working together but unlike most leaders has made it a priority\nProviding teachers with common time to work together multiple times every week on ideas and projects they find valuable and important, not ideas imposed by the district. As John says, \nAny question, is the right answer. You'll get the grant money\nHe told me that when teachers request transportation for field trips, they never have to give a reason why. If a teacher wants to take their students outside of the classroom his response isn’t to ask why but why not?\n\n\n\n
  • We need to see and treat teachers as researchers, working everyday on trying to make better learning experiences and reflecting as publicly as possible this research. Just as our \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • That reflection, documentation and sharing of what happens each day in the classroom is a wonderful gift for yourself and for others. We’ve got to strive for better, richer ways of finding success. Agency and autonomy are the cornerstones of a free and democratic society. Schools should be places that embody those ideals. The idea of accountability goes away as we embrace the notions of responsibilities for ourselves, for each other and for our students.\n
  • \n

How To Make Better Teachers How To Make Better Teachers Presentation Transcript

  • How to Make Better Teachers Dean Shareski State of Now 140edu NYChttp://www.flickr.com/photos/a2gemma/1448178195/ July 31, 2012
  • Prescribe http://www.flickr.com/photos/nwabr/6054399975/
  • Prescribe Describe http://www.flickr.com/photos/nwabr/6054399975/
  • 1988
  • 2005ideasandthoughts.org
  • 917 posts
  • 3,674 comments
  • I hadSpeaking personally, I realized one day that without intending todeveloped a critical community around my blog, agroup of people who were willing to save mefrom my own lousy classroom designchoices. They got better at giving criticism and I got better at receiving it. I alsogot better at posting the kind of rich, multimedia artifacts of classroom practice —photos, videos, handouts, etc. — that facilitated that criticism. I started to plan lessonswhile wondering at the same time, "What about this is gonna be worth sharing?"Lesson planning and blogging becamehopelessly and wonderfully tangled up. Dan Meyer @ddmeyer http://blog.mrmeyer.com
  • Shelley Wright @wrightsroomhttp://shelleywright.wordpress.com
  • Shelley Wright @wrightsroomhttp://shelleywright.wordpress.com
  • Shelley Wright @wrightsroomhttp://shelleywright.wordpress.com
  • Shelley Wright @wrightsroomhttp://shelleywright.wordpress.com
  • http://www.kidsmagicschool.com/imges_magic%20school/Brandon_Scott_magic%20teacher.jpg
  • “...there is no word for "accountability" in Finnish.”
  • “Accountability iswhats left when you take out responsibility.”
  • “I wish we could stop using the word "accountable" and instead talk about "responsible". It would make all the difference.”
  • Things you never see
  • “Distrust is anexpensive vice” Dave Weinberger “Too Big To Know”
  • If we create cultures of trust and sharing,accountability is built in,not contrived or imposed, it just is.
  • John GaiptmanSuperintendentGreater Victoria School DistrictVictoria, BC
  • John GaiptmanSuperintendentGreater Victoria School DistrictVictoria, BC“Any question is the right answer.”
  • John GaiptmanSuperintendentGreater Victoria School DistrictVictoria, BC
  • John GaiptmanSuperintendentGreater Victoria School DistrictVictoria, BC “The only obligation is to share”
  • Teachers:Where and when do you make time for deepreflection and revealing the secrets and questionssurrounding your craft?
  • Teachers:Where and when do you make time for deepreflection and revealing the secrets and questionssurrounding your craft?Leaders:How are you honoring teachers inherent senseof responsibility and providing ways to restoreagency and professionalism to their calling?
  • “We Can’t Measure Learning, We Can Only Document It” http://www.flickr.com/photos/albertogp123/5843577306
  • Thanks shareski.ca @shareski dean@shareski.caDean Shareski