Rasasi Perfumes - Retail brand development

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  • 1. RASASI Communication Strategy for Retail Brand Development in the UAE Created by: Shantanu Sengupta, Madison Advertising, Dubai 19th June 2003 © Shantanu Sengupta; © Madison Advertising; June-2003
  • 2. What you told us…  Founded in 1979 Rasasi’s rapid success over the years necessitated the establishment of a full-fledged manufacturing facility in Jebel Ali, in 1985.  Rasasi’s operations are broadly based on two product lines:  Alcohol based perfumes – commercially named as “French Line”  Oriental Oil based perfumes  While alcohol based perfumes are marketed through perfume distributors in GCC, the Oriental perfumes are exclusively sold through Rasasi’s 30 showrooms in the region  Till date no serious efforts initiated to promote Rasasi outlets and Oriental perfumes © Shantanu Sengupta; © Madison Advertising; June-2003
  • 3. Problem Definition  Though well-established, Rasasi holds the image of an “affordable” brand  Rasasi’s expertise in the category of premium Oriental perfumes is not recognized  Foot count in Rasasi outlets not very impressive © Shantanu Sengupta; © Madison Advertising; June-2003
  • 4. Task  Establish a distinct identity for Rasasi Oriental perfumes  Develop an integrated communication program to promote Rasasi outlets in UAE © Shantanu Sengupta; © Madison Advertising; June-2003
  • 5. Environmental Analysis The following slides provide a kaleidoscope of our understanding of the market, competition, and consumer insights Agency has collated these findings from several authorized sources to reach a clear roadmap for the task at hand © Shantanu Sengupta; © Madison Advertising; June-2003
  • 6. The Market Total oriental perfumes - UAE  Overall Oriental perfumes exceed AED 1 Billion /year Oud /  Oud commands up to 30% Agar wood  Highly price sensitive 30%  Prone to counterfeit products  Dominant players: Others  Rasasi 70%  Ajmal  Al Haramain  Swiss Arabian Source: (1) Gulf News, 31 May 2003.  Nabeel (2) GMR, Nov ’02.
  • 7. Consumer Buying Habits  Level of market penetration Women 90% Men 75% 4.5 4  Brand usage - Women: National women 4.2/hd 3.5 Expat Arab women 3.1/hd 3 Western/Asian 2.8/hd 2.5 2  Brand usage - Men National men 3.5/hd 1.5 Expat Arab men 3.5/hd 1 Asian men 2.2/hd 0.5 Western men 2.0/hd 0 Nat Exp. Asn Wst Source: AC Nielsen, 2002 General perfume usage Arb
  • 8. Consumer Buying Habits Women  67% of the market consists of heavy users  Among heavy users 92% experiment with new brands  Frequency of purchase is 3-4 times a month (Heavy users)  83% have a preferred retailer  However 100% try new retail outlets Men  42% of the market are heavy users and 58% regular users  100% Experiment with new brands  Trial of new retail outlets predominantly less among males Source: AC Nielsen, 2002 © Shantanu Sengupta; © Madison Advertising; June-2003
  • 9. The Consumer Mind The following insightsprovide a glimpse of brand recall and recognition levels:  No local brand featured in the list of top 3-5 recalled brands  No unaided recall of any particular local brand  Only 7% aided recall of a given brand Source: AC Nielsen, 2002 © Shantanu Sengupta; © Madison Advertising; June-2003
  • 10. Purchase Patterns - Nationals  Perfume selection based on mixing of scents and their overall appeal  Strong scents preferred  Salesman’s knowledge and interaction, a critical factor in purchase facilitation  Women comprise of 63% of retail shoppers (no accompanying males)  Only 17% of the men shop alone  Shopping done primarily from a list of preferred retailers  Retailer preference formed on basis of “liked products”, store convenience and appeal, and salesman’s approach Source: AC Nielsen 2002 © Shantanu Sengupta; © Madison Advertising; June-2003
  • 11. Inferences (consumer)  High levels of brand usage among National women and men indicate opportunities for new product and marketing initiatives  Willingness to experiment with new brands highlight windows of opportunity for new products  Willingness to try new retail outlets provide opportunity to gain access to preferred retailer list  Need to increase brand recognition as brand recall levels are relatively low © Shantanu Sengupta; © Madison Advertising; June-2003
  • 12. So who’s our target? © Shantanu Sengupta; © Madison Advertising; June-2003
  • 13. Rasasi Target Audience Primary  National women in the age bracket of 15-49 Secondary  National men in the age bracket of 20-49  Expatriate men and women in the age bracket of 20- 39 © Shantanu Sengupta; © Madison Advertising; June-2003
  • 14. The Decision Making Unit Information providers Influencers 15-24 year old women 1) 20-35 year old women Higher media habits Style and fashion consciousness 2) 45+ men and women Traditional knowledge Rasasi Purchase agents Consumers Women 20-49 yr. 1) Women 15-49 yrs. Old women and men Higher usage of perfume Traditional shoppers 2) Men 25-39 yrs. Heavy fragrance users
  • 15. A typical Rasasi user in UAE  A young but mature woman, aged between 28-35 years  Happily married, with children  Devoutly loves her family – husband, children, parents, and others  Most refined in her tastes, and seeks out the most exquisite (not necessarily expensive) things in life  Understands and accepts her Arabic roots, ie. cultures, tradition and values – although most modern in disposition  Loves to shop for herself and her husband A BLEND OF TRADITIONAL VALUES WITH A MODERN ARABIC DISPOSITION © Shantanu Sengupta; © Madison Advertising; June-2003
  • 16. © Shantanu Sengupta; © Madison Advertising; June-2003
  • 17. Retail Observations - competition  Overall, majority of retail outlets look similar in product display and décor  Lack of consistency in store designs for most of the retailers  Visible consistency only in case of:  Ajmal – eg. arch at the store entrance, window display, etc.  Al Haramain and Arabian Oud – eg. dominant use of deep brown shade: the color of oud © Shantanu Sengupta; © Madison Advertising; June-2003
  • 18. Retail Observations – Rasasi Currently Rasasi outlets do not possess a uniform brand image:  No uniform sign boards  Store layout and environs are not consistent  Interior designs are inconsistent  Product merchandising is not focused Lack of seating arrangements… could lead to reduced opportunities of customer interaction. © Shantanu Sengupta; © Madison Advertising; June-2003
  • 19. Retail outlets – Inferences  Need to stand out from the crowd – have a distinct image  Need to enhance customer experience through effective presentation of products and improving the decor  Need for store branding, to enhance brand perception and value © Shantanu Sengupta; © Madison Advertising; June-2003
  • 20. © Shantanu Sengupta; © Madison Advertising; June-2003
  • 21. Observations  All communication seemed similar, with highlights on:  The range of the products, OR  Special offers, discounts  No visible efforts on brand building, except Ajmal Conclusion:  Opportunity lies for Rasasi to establish brand identity / recall, by maintaining consistency in communication. © Shantanu Sengupta; © Madison Advertising; June-2003
  • 22. Positioning platforms - Competitors Agency identified 4 major active competitors: Ajmal Quality, Expertise (Finest Oriental perfumes) Al Haramain Quality, Expertise Nabeel No consistent claims Abdul Samad Quality, Heritage, Tradition Al Qureshi © Shantanu Sengupta; © Madison Advertising; June-2003
  • 23. Rasasi - The Brand Asset Brand variables Brand attributes  Over two decades of experience  Provider of traditional fragrances  High depth in oriental perfumes  Experience and knowledge  Own factory  Trust gained over the years  30 Retail outlets  High quality Key brand assets • Tradition • Trust / knowledge / expertise • Exquisite quality
  • 24. Rasasi – positioning platform Key brand offering  Exquisite and unique fragrances  Arabian heritage  Traditional knowledge and experience A brand that uses its experience and traditional knowledge in bringing exquisite oriental fragrances that celebrate Arabian heritage. © Shantanu Sengupta; © Madison Advertising; June-2003
  • 25. Communication Objectives  Upgrade the current perception levels of Rasasi Oriental line to being premium and prestigious  Increase foot count at all Rasasi retail outlets © Shantanu Sengupta; © Madison Advertising; June-2003
  • 26. Communication Strategy A 2-tier integrated approach that interlaces between strategic and tactical routes: Brand Campaign In-store decor Strategic Concept corners Retail Branding Fascia branding POS materials Occasional gift packs Exclusive Clubs Tactical Events /Offers / Sponsorship Consumer promos © Shantanu Sengupta; © Madison Advertising; June-2003
  • 27. Strategic Brand Campaign © Shantanu Sengupta; © Madison Advertising; June-2003
  • 28. Brand Campaign  Key brand assets used as anchor points to enhance brand perception and image.  Three alternative creative platforms have been developed. © Shantanu Sengupta; © Madison Advertising; June-2003
  • 29. Brand Campaign (contd.) Platform 1 Rasasi knows the secret of producing the finest of perfumes. Rationale:  The ingredients of Oriental perfumes are all similar.  However, only a seasoned perfume manufacturer knows how to blend them to produce the finest. © Shantanu Sengupta; © Madison Advertising; June-2003
  • 30. Brand Campaign (contd.) Platform 2 Rasasi is the insignia of its customers. Rationale:  Rasasi understands the depth of Arab culture and its values  Rasasi offers an opportunity to its customers to express these values on a personal level © Shantanu Sengupta; © Madison Advertising; June-2003
  • 31. Brand Campaign (contd.) Platform 3 Rasasi is a part of the Arabian heritage. Rationale:  Inherent spirit of Rasasi is associated with the traditional aspects of the Arab culture  Certain elements define a culture…and they are irreplaceable, viz. coffee, henna, tablah… and RASASI © Shantanu Sengupta; © Madison Advertising; June-2003
  • 32. Brand Campaign (contd.) Communication Tools  ATL  Newspapers, Magazines and Outdoor  BTL  Leaflets and Roll-up stands  PR  Product launch coverage, stories, interviews and sponsorship © Shantanu Sengupta; © Madison Advertising; June-2003
  • 33. Strategic Retail Branding © Shantanu Sengupta; © Madison Advertising; June-2003
  • 34. Retail Store Branding  Clear and single branding policy for all stores  Similar signboards  Interior environs and décor to reflect key brand themes (soft Arabian music, seating facility…)  Segregated and rationalized merchandising to reduce clutter  Increased focus by highlighting only one product on the display shelf (if feasible)  Color schemes to be limited to main dominant brand colors and matching support colours  Monitors that play videos showing brand range © Shantanu Sengupta; © Madison Advertising; June-2003
  • 35. Concept Corner (Retail)  Concept Corner at selected Rasasi retail outlets that cater to oriental perfume connoisseurs  Corner to reflect a 5 star luxury  Segregated from the rest of the store  Proactive staff in suits  Coffee/tea with dates served by an attendant in traditional attire (like the doormen at major hotels)  Seating arrangements for customers  New products brochures to be given away  Video monitors to play Rasasi product promos © Shantanu Sengupta; © Madison Advertising; June-2003
  • 36. Tactical Consumer promotions © Shantanu Sengupta; © Madison Advertising; June-2003
  • 37. Consumer Promotions  Devised to increase the foot count to Rasasi outlets  Reward Rasasi customers with gifts reflecting the associative brand values of Rasasi © Shantanu Sengupta; © Madison Advertising; June-2003
  • 38. Consumer Promotions - DSS / Ramadan 03 Mechanics:  Spend Dhs. 200 (TBD) and get a raffle coupon Prizes (through raffle draws):  DSS 03 – Cartier / Omega watches for men and women Ramadan 03 – Exclusive brands of Bahraini pearl necklace or other high fashion branded jewellery © Shantanu Sengupta; © Madison Advertising; June-2003
  • 39. Consumer Promotions - DSS / Ramadan 03 Communication Tools  ATL  Newspapers, Magazines, Radio and Outdoor  BTL  Leaflets, coupons, buntings, draw box, danglers, Roll- up stands…  PR  Stories, photo captions and interviews © Shantanu Sengupta; © Madison Advertising; June-2003
  • 40. Tactical Rasasi Royal Club © Shantanu Sengupta; © Madison Advertising; June-2003
  • 41. Rasasi Royal Club To retain the customer build-up, and stimulate brand loyalty  Customer details collected from promos and concept corners  Memberships through customer profiling  Initiate relationship marketing through direct mailers  Launch of new products (members to get x% discount if purchased within the first two weeks)  Cross product/brand offers at birthdays / special occasions  Pyramid offers (for you, husband, children, aunt…) with appropriate products © Shantanu Sengupta; © Madison Advertising; June-2003
  • 42. Thank You Contact: Shantanu Sengupta Advertising / Branding Strategist; Marcom Specialist. shantanu.seng@gmail.com http://om.linkedin.com/in/shantanusengupta © Shantanu Sengupta; © Madison Advertising; June-2003