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Early renaissance
Early renaissance
Early renaissance
Early renaissance
Early renaissance
Early renaissance
Early renaissance
Early renaissance
Early renaissance
Early renaissance
Early renaissance
Early renaissance
Early renaissance
Early renaissance
Early renaissance
Early renaissance
Early renaissance
Early renaissance
Early renaissance
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Early renaissance

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  • 1. The Early Renaissance
  • 2.
    • “ The Holy Trinity” by Masaccio, c.1425
    • Fresco, 21 ft. 9 in. x 9 ft. 4 in.
    • Used new linear perspective system
    • Interior is rectangular room with barrel
    • vault and ledge on back wall
    • -Inscription on sarcophagus reads, “ I
    • was once what you are. And what I am
    • you too will be.”
    • -Reminder of death called “memento mori”
    • -Pyramidal arrangement of figures to
    • reflect its meaning of Trinity
  • 3. “ Brancacci Chapel” by Masaccio. Painted in 1420s. -Shared commission with Masolino, who painted “Temptation of Adam and Eve” -Frescoes completed in 1480s by Filippino Lippi after Masaccio’s death -Masaccio used chiaroscuro “light and dark” like Giotto
  • 4. “ Expulsion from Eden” from Brancacci Chapel -2 of the most powerful nudes painted since antiquity -Eve’s pose derived from a Greek goddess
  • 5. “ The Tribute Money” from Brancacci Chapel, Florence -Use of atmospheric (aerial) perspective to show distance
  • 6. “ David” by Donatello, c. 1430-40. Bronze 5 ft. 2 1/2 in. high -Probably commissioned by Medici family for a pedestal in their palace courtyard -Pose recalls that of Polykleitos’s Spear Bearer -David was an important symbol for Florence in its resistance against tyranny. Represented the underdog against a more powerful aggressor.
  • 7.  
  • 8. “ The Youthful David” by Andrea del Castagno. C. 1450. Tempera on leather mounted on wood. -2 moments are depicted in narrative: David launching the sling and stone embedded in Goliath’s head -Shows action where Donatello’s sculpture is relaxed
  • 9. “ David” by Andrea del Verrocchio. early 1470s. Bronze. Approximately 49 in. -Leading sculptor of second half of 15th cent. -commissioned by Lorenzo de Medici -More straightforward than Donatello’s and a comment on it -Transformed into an angular adolescent -General effect of slightly gawky, outgoing, entergetic boy
  • 10. “ Sir John Hawkwood” by Paolo Uccello 1436 “ Gattamelata” by Donatello 1445-50 11x 13 ft. Bronze -Equestrian portrait of Condottiere “ soldier of fortune”
  • 11. “ Battista Sforza and Federico da Montefeltro” by Piero della Francesca 1475. Oil and tempera on panel. Each panel 18 1/2 x 13 in.
  • 12. “ Annunciation” by Piero della Francesca c. 1450. Fresco 10 ft. 9 1/2 in. x 6 ft. 4 in. -Combined Christian iconography with geometry and the Classical revival
  • 13. “ Annunciation” by Fra Angelico. C. 1440, Fresco 6 ft. 1 1/2 in. x 5 ft. 1 1/2 in. -Thin, delicate figures -Light to convey spirituality
  • 14. “ Birth of Venus” by Sandro Botticelli” c. 1482. Tempera on canvas. 5 ft. 8 in. x 9 ft. 1 in.
  • 15. “ Ghent Altarpiece” by Jan van Eyck. 1432. Oil on panel. Approx 11 ft. 6 in x 14 ft. 5 in. -van Eyck was most prominent painter of early 15th cent. In north
  • 16.  
  • 17. “ Ghent Altarpiece” closed
  • 18. “ Man in a Red Turban” by van Eyck. 1433. Tempera and Oil on Wood.
  • 19. “ Arnolfini Portrait” by van Eyck. 1434. Oil on Wood. 32 1/4” x 23 1/2”

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