Receiving from family,friends,and non-profits-ppt
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Receiving from family,friends,and non-profits-ppt

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  • i. Ask participants to discuss what the statement “You are better off being a part of a community than by yourself” means to them. <br /> ii. Relate back to the “caveperson activity” completed in the anticipatory set and discuss how difficult it would be to survive on your own. <br />
  • i. Discuss the definition of communities and explain that a community extends beyond the local geographic area where you live. A community may include the suburb where you live, the rural area where you live, your church, another organization you are involved in, your school, your state, a social networking site you belong to, etc. <br /> ii. Ask participants to determine what communities they are a part of making sure to consider local, extended, and even virtual communities. <br />
  • i. Refer back to the communities discussed in slide 3 and ask participants to determine how they benefit from the communities they are a part of. <br /> ii. Explain that being a part of a community provides you with access to resources, such as roads, stores and restaurants. <br /> iii. Being a part of a community also connects you with others and allows you to build social relationships. This is known as social capital. <br />
  • Explain that social relationships provide benefits for all domains of well‐being. Use the examples provided to stress that social relationships offer a wide variety of benefits. <br />
  • i. Explain that social capital provides financial benefits even if you aren’t directly receiving money. <br /> ii. Make sure to consider in‐kind income when considering the benefits of social capital. <br />
  • Explain that for most people the main part of their social capital consists of family, friends, and non‐profits. <br />
  • i. Ask participants what they think family is. <br /> ii. Discuss the definition and explain that family could include immediate and extended family members who are related by blood, marriage, adoption (including foster children) as well as unrelated individuals who live in one household. <br />
  • i. Tell participants to refer back to the family members discussed on slide 8 and determine at least three forms of support those family members provide. <br /> 1. Tell participants that when creating their list, they should make sure to consider in‐kind income, the well‐being domains, and how their family provides for both their needs and their wants. <br /> ii. Ask participants to share some of the items on their list and discuss how family members provide for each other, especially as a young adult. <br /> iii. Ask participants to determine what they would do if they didn’t receive this support from their family. <br />
  • i. Explain that in addition to family social networks also include relationships with friends. <br /> ii. Ask participants to determine at least three ways their friends support them. Examples may include getting a ride, emotional support/advice, borrowing money, etc. <br />
  • i. Discuss the definition of a non‐profit and use the examples provided on the slide. <br /> ii. Ask participants to brainstorm some non‐profits in your local community. <br />
  • i. Explain that non‐profits offer the opportunity to enhance your social capital by being about to receive and give. For example, volunteering at the local food bank and being a member of Boy or Girl Scouts are ways to use non‐profits to enhance social capital. <br /> 1. Explain that in addition to enhancing social capital, non‐profits can also offer the opportunity to enhance human capital by developing transferable skills and providing experiences. <br /> ii. Non‐profits also provide assistance during times of need, such as food banks that provide free food and rescue missions that provide free shelter. <br />
  • i. Ask participants to consider all of the support received from their social relationships. Have they done anything to express their gratitude for this support? <br /> ii. Explain that in an important part of social capital is giving. Giving back to those you receive from is a form of gratitude and will enhance your social capital. <br /> iii. Stress that giving doesn’t have to be monetary. Giving can include small things such as mowing the lawn or preparing a meal. <br />
  • Explain to participants that social capital provides financial support because they may receive benefits from social capital that they would have had to pay for otherwise. For example, borrowing an item that you would have had to pay for otherwise or having a free place to live. <br />
  • Summarize the main points of the lesson. <br />

Receiving from family,friends,and non-profits-ppt Receiving from family,friends,and non-profits-ppt Presentation Transcript

  • 1.20.1.G1 Receiving from Family, Friends, and Non-Profits “Take Charge of Your Finances” Advanced Level
  • 1.20.1.G1 What does this statement mean to you? You are better off being a part of a community than by yourself © Family Economics & Financial Education – May 2012 – Receiving from Family, Friends, and Non-Profits – Slide 2 Funded by a grant from Take Charge America, Inc. to the Norton School of Family and Consumer Sciences Take Charge America Institute at the University of Arizona
  • 1.20.1.G1 Community A group of people working together for a common good What communities are you a part of? Local •Your city/town •Your school •An organization Extended •Your state •The United States Virtual •Social networking •Discussion forums © Family Economics & Financial Education – May 2012 – Receiving from Family, Friends, and Non-Profits – Slide 3 Funded by a grant from Take Charge America, Inc. to the Norton School of Family and Consumer Sciences Take Charge America Institute at the University of Arizona
  • 1.20.1.G1 What benefits do you receive from being a part of these communities? Roads Access to resources Stores Social relationships Social Capital access a person has to social relationships that can provide resources © Family Economics & Financial Education – May 2012 – Receiving from Family, Friends, and Non-Profits – Slide 4 Funded by a grant from Take Charge America, Inc. to the Norton School of Family and Consumer Sciences Take Charge America Institute at the University of Arizona
  • 1.20.1.G1 Social relationships can provide many benefits Consider benefits received from all well-being domains Monetary gift from a family member An athletic trainer may help you reach fitness goals Physical Financial Emotional Intellectual Social Knowledge from a teacher or instructor Team work from an organization such as a sports team Support from a friend during tough times © Family Economics & Financial Education – May 2012 – Receiving from Family, Friends, and Non-Profits – Slide 5 Funded by a grant from Take Charge America, Inc. to the Norton School of Family and Consumer Sciences Take Charge America Institute at the University of Arizona
  • 1.20.1.G1 Consider in-direct financial benefits received from social capital… In-kind income - the provision of a product or service rather than cash A place to live for free A ride if your car breaks down Borrowing a lawn mower to mow your lawn © Family Economics & Financial Education – May 2012 – Receiving from Family, Friends, and Non-Profits – Slide 6 Funded by a grant from Take Charge America, Inc. to the Norton School of Family and Consumer Sciences Take Charge America Institute at the University of Arizona A gift
  • 1.20.1.G1 Most people’s social capital consists of… Family Non-Profits Friends © Family Economics & Financial Education – May 2012 – Receiving from Family, Friends, and Non-Profits – Slide 7 Funded by a grant from Take Charge America, Inc. to the Norton School of Family and Consumer Sciences Take Charge America Institute at the University of Arizona
  • 1.20.1.G1 What is family? A group of individuals who share resources (especially time and money) and concern about each other’s well-being © Family Economics & Financial Education – May 2012 – Receiving from Family, Friends, and Non-Profits – Slide 8 Funded by a grant from Take Charge America, Inc. to the Norton School of Family and Consumer Sciences Take Charge America Institute at the University of Arizona
  • 1.20.1.G1 Family support • What are three forms of support you currently receive from your family? – Consider in-kind income – Consider all your well-being domains – Consider how your family provides for both your needs AND wants What would you do if you didn’t receive this support from your family? © Family Economics & Financial Education – May 2012 – Receiving from Family, Friends, and Non-Profits – Slide 9 Funded by a grant from Take Charge America, Inc. to the Norton School of Family and Consumer Sciences Take Charge America Institute at the University of Arizona
  • 1.20.1.G1 Friends What are three ways your friends support you? © Family Economics & Financial Education – May 2012 – Receiving from Family, Friends, and Non-Profits – Slide 10 Funded by a grant from Take Charge America, Inc. to the Norton School of Family and Consumer Sciences Take Charge America Institute at the University of Arizona
  • 1.20.1.G1 What is a non-profit organization? Examples include: An organization that exists for human service, conservation, religious, or other charitable purposes to benefit others Girl or Boy Scouts Local food banks Salvation Army YMCA Local rescue missions What non-profits are available in your local community? © Family Economics & Financial Education – May 2012 – Receiving from Family, Friends, and Non-Profits – Slide 11 Funded by a grant from Take Charge America, Inc. to the Norton School of Family and Consumer Sciences Take Charge America Institute at the University of Arizona
  • 1.20.1.G1 You can benefit from non-profits in two primary ways… Enhance your social capital • Enhance your life by receiving from a nonprofit • Or, give back to a nonprofit (volunteer, donate) • Can also enhance human capital Assist you in times of need • Can help you obtain basic needs for survival such as food, clothing, and shelter • Connect you with resources to help you become self-sufficient again © Family Economics & Financial Education – May 2012 – Receiving from Family, Friends, and Non-Profits – Slide 12 Funded by a grant from Take Charge America, Inc. to the Norton School of Family and Consumer Sciences Take Charge America Institute at the University of Arizona
  • 1.20.1.G1 Giving back Have you done anything to express your gratitude for the support you receive from family, friends, and non-profits or provide support in return? Receiving Giving © Family Economics & Financial Education – May 2012 – Receiving from Family, Friends, and Non-Profits – Slide 13 Funded by a grant from Take Charge America, Inc. to the Norton School of Family and Consumer Sciences Take Charge America Institute at the University of Arizona
  • 1.20.1.G1 Social Capital and Financial Support You may receive benefits from social capital that you may have had to pay for otherwise! © Family Economics & Financial Education – May 2012 – Receiving from Family, Friends, and Non-Profits – Slide 14 Funded by a grant from Take Charge America, Inc. to the Norton School of Family and Consumer Sciences Take Charge America Institute at the University of Arizona
  • 1.20.1.G1 Summary Social capital is a benefit of being a part of a community Social capital provides benefits in all areas of your life Family, friends, and nonprofits are an important part of social capital Investing in your social capital by receiving and giving will contribute to your well-being © Family Economics & Financial Education – May 2012 – Receiving from Family, Friends, and Non-Profits – Slide 15 Funded by a grant from Take Charge America, Inc. to the Norton School of Family and Consumer Sciences Take Charge America Institute at the University of Arizona