Technology Summer
Camp
AUGUST 15, 2013
Ourtrainers
Creating Magic:
Igniting Curiosity and Thinking in the 21st Century
18th Century – 20th Century:
The S-Curve
John Seeley Brown
Stability
(50-60 years)
New Technology
Slowly Introduced
Stabil...
The Big Shift
New Technologies
Every 18 months
Moore’s Law
Bandwidth
Law
A World of Constant Flux
Examples
Date Employees
Feb 1999 8
Nov 1999 40
2002 682
2004 3,021
2006 10,674
2008 20,222
2010 24,400
2012 37,544
Today 4...
Curiosity Amplifiers
How Gaming Could
Change the World
• Joy
• Relief
• Love
• Surprise
• Pride
• Curiosity
• Excitement
• Awe & Wonder
• Conte...
The Epic Win
Massive Multiplayer
Thumb-Wrestling
Jane McGonigal
• Joy
• Relief
• Love
• Surprise
• Pride
• Curiosity
• Excitement
• Awe & Wonder
• Contentment
• Creativity
“In times of drastic
change, it is the learners
who will inherit the
future”
--LEE COCKRELL
“CREATING MAGIC: 10 COMMON SEN...
“The illiterate of the 21st Century
will not be those who cannot read
and write, but those who cannot
learn, unlearn and r...
Your mission…
◦Become a 21st Century learner
◦Be curious
◦Be resilient
◦Have hope, courage and
optimism; you are capable o...
References
What is 21st Century Education Video - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ax5cNlutAys
John Seeley Brown - http://ww...
Creating Magic: Igniting Curiosity and Thinking in the 21st Century
Creating Magic: Igniting Curiosity and Thinking in the 21st Century
Creating Magic: Igniting Curiosity and Thinking in the 21st Century
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Creating Magic: Igniting Curiosity and Thinking in the 21st Century

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Kick-off keynote for Everett Public School's Summer Tech Camp on August 15, 2013. The presentation shares work from John Seeley Brown and Jane McGonigal. The first section focuses on the Big Shift from a life in which knowledge remains stable to a life in which technology is rapidly changing at an exponential rate. What does this mean for us adults in this world? How can we become more curious and 21st Century Learners ourselves? The second half of the presentation shares Jane McGonigal's research on how gaming affects our emotions, mood and disposition.

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  • http://www.pulsardesktop.eu/data/media/922/Fireworks_Wallpapers_1005.jpg
  • From the 18th Century to the 20th century, we lived in the era of the S-curve - an era of relative stability with regards to social and cultural development. During this time, technology would occasionally be added to a specific location and would slowly spread to the world. There were long periods of stability spanning 50 to 70 years. Institutions were invented to help society understand how to operate during this period. Teaching practices worked and career paths were clear and skills learned lasted a lifetime.
  • JSB calls the beginning of the 21st century, "The Big Shift". It has been driven by digital innovators and is an era of exponential change and emergence both socially and culturally. New skills and practices are evolving at an exponential rate and new technologies often last no longer than 18 months before something new has replaced them. The technical skills that one could depend on for a lifetime in the S-Curve society are now irrelevant and skills we learn now will be irrelevant in just a few years, meaning that we need to become 21st century learners if we are to function in this new society and in the 21st Century workplace. Shifting from a predictable world of equilibrium to an exponential world of constant flux and disequilibrium. The notion of equilibrium is gone, it is never to exist again in anyone's lifetime. The infrastructure of the 21st Century is driven by exponential rules and laws and they show no sign of slowing - Moore's Law - the overall processing power for computers DOUBLES every 18 months to… this has been true since the 70's when this term first originated.Bandwidth law - Our high-end connection speeds grow by 50% per year.In 1996, you would dial up and click and wait… most websites were text based. To download a 1MB picture took 5-7 minutes in 1996. Now, it is practically instantaneous. We can watch videos on the internet… live video even.
  • Civilization has never seen an era like we are now entering, where there is no termination, or equalizing that we see ahead in terms of these rapid changes. If this is true, the half-life of any particular skill is shrinking each year. As we teach our students a skill, it may have a half-life of around 5 years. Learning now has more to do with creating the new rather than learning the old, but if you are constantly creating the new, then much of what you are creating is a very strong, tacit knowledge component. We are used to passing around, delivering, teaching the explicit, not just tacit knowledge . Tacit knowledge is that stuff that you “just know how to do”. Things like riding a bike. They aren’t easily explainable. In our world, more and more skills are becoming skills that are tacit and difficult to explain. It takes time to codify what can be codified from an experience to make it explicit.  Challenges we have - if we have a world of constant flux and constant change, we shouldn’t over look something. Maybe the most important thing we have to worry about is how do we afford curiosity? Because basically if you are not curious, you are out of luck in a world of constant flux.
  • In August of 1998, a man named Andy Bechtolsheim (co-founder of Sun Microsystems) wrote a check for $100,000 to an entity that didn't exist named, "google" In September of 1998, they set up office in the garage of Susan Wojicki. (http://www.google.com/about/company/history/). Today, they employ over 40,000 people. When I was teaching in 1996, 1997, and 1998, working at Google wasn't even an option for my students' future, yet by the time they graduated college in 2006, that was a choice for over 10,000 graduates. January 2004: "theFacebook" launches to Harvard StudentsMarch 2004: expands to Stanford, Columbia and YaleOctober 2005 - Expands to 21 universities around the globe and becomes "Facebook"September 2006 - Facebook opens to anyone 13 and over with an email addressToday - over 1 billion users
  • We should start thinking about smartphones and tablets not so much as communication devices, but as curiosity amplifiers. When you look something up in the middle of a conversation, it starts to shift the conversation.  Not only do we need to worry about preparing our students for the 21st Century, we need to worry about preparing ourselves for this world of constant change. We need to rethink how we learn (especially tacit knowledge), what we need to learn and how new media has changed the game in fundamental ways.


  • When you are using technology and you come across something you don't know how to do, what do you typically do?

    http://www.polleverywhere.com/multiple_choice_polls/4GtUEYZggXgeOSQ
  • Everyone has a vested interest in education, partly because it is education that is supposed to take us into this future we can't grasp.The children entering kindergarten this year will retire in the year 2073 (if they retire at 65).Nobody has a clue despite all the expertise that is out there what the year will look like in 5 years time, but we are supposed to be educating them for it.
  • She is the New York Times bestselling author of Reality is Broken: Why Games Make Us Better and How They Can Change the World (Penguin Press, 2011) — and is the inventor and co-founder of SuperBetter, a game that has helped more than 200,000 players tackle real-life health challenges such as depression, anxiety, chronic pain, and traumatic brain injury.She has created and deployed award-winning games, sports and secret missions in more than 30 countries on six continentsWe spend 3 billion hours weekly playing online games - some of you probably think that is way too much time considering that maybe that time should be spent dealing with solving all of the problems we have in the real world. According to Jane's research, it's actually the opposite. 3 billion is not nearly enough gameplay to solve the world's urgent problems. Instead, if we want to solve problems like world hunger, climate change, conflicts we should be investing 21 billion hours per week playing online games by the end of this decade. This would be 3 billion people playing games for 1 hour each day.Here is why games are so essential:Many people think that people game to get away from the real world, but what we are doing when we play games is tapping into our best qualities. To be motivated, optimistic, to collaborate with others and to be resilient in the face of failure. But how does being our best selves in the game world affect who we are in the real world? It turns out that the emotions we feel in games spill over into our real lives. Research shows that playing a game as a powerful character for just 90 seconds will change how confident you are for 24 hours. You're more likely to do well in a workplace meeting, taking a test and even when meeting strangers, you'll talk to people that you wouldn't have approached if you hadn't played the game.Jane's work is about helping gamers understand that they are the same person in the real world as they are when they play games and she is developing games that connect gamers to real world problems.When we play a game, we tackle tough challenges with more creativity, more determination, more optimism, and we're more likely to reach out to others for helpIf you can manage to experience three positive emotions for every one negative emotion … you dramatically improve your health and your ability to successfully tackle any problem you're facingIn fact, there are 10 emotions that are experienced by playing games. They are… More about these in a minute.
  • You probably see a sense of urgency, fear and deep, deep concentration.If you are a gamer, you might see:Crinkle of eyes optimismEyebrows up – surpriseOn the verge of what is called an epic win.An outcomes that is so extraordinarily positive that you had no idea it was even possible until you achieved it. It was almost beyond the thresholds of imagination and when you get there you are shocked to discover what you’re truly capable of. That’s an epic win. This is the face that we need to see on millions of problem solvers all over the world as they tackle the obstacles of the coming years. This is the face that you should have as you encounter situations in which you didn’t think that it was possible, but with perseverance, resilience, and optimism, you achieve your goal.Let me show you what Jane means by the 10 positive emotions that come from gaming and what an epic win feels like. We are now going to play one of Jane’s favorite games. In June at the ISTE Conference in San Antonio, we had over 6000 of us playing it simultaneously. Let’s take a look.
  • monochrom introduced the concept of 'Massive Multiplayer Thumb-Wrestling' in 2004.The principle of thumb-wrestling is simple. Two players take each others right hand and entangle their fingers - except the thumbs - forming a fist. The players then try to catch and freeze the opponent's thumb.By forming a star, it is also possible to play the game with three or four participants. The left hands are also free to hook up with even more players. Again a connection with up to 4 players is possible. By Massive Thumb-Wrestling according to the rules described above unlimited amounts of players can connect to join a Multiplayer Thumb-Wrestling Network. As the number of players is unlimited, global thumb-wrestling may emerge through self-sustaining peer-to-peer networks and ad-hoc socializing
  • So did we experience each of these?
  • Creating Magic: Igniting Curiosity and Thinking in the 21st Century

    1. 1. Technology Summer Camp AUGUST 15, 2013
    2. 2. Ourtrainers
    3. 3. Creating Magic: Igniting Curiosity and Thinking in the 21st Century
    4. 4. 18th Century – 20th Century: The S-Curve John Seeley Brown Stability (50-60 years) New Technology Slowly Introduced Stability (50-60 years)
    5. 5. The Big Shift New Technologies Every 18 months Moore’s Law Bandwidth Law
    6. 6. A World of Constant Flux
    7. 7. Examples Date Employees Feb 1999 8 Nov 1999 40 2002 682 2004 3,021 2006 10,674 2008 20,222 2010 24,400 2012 37,544 Today 40,178
    8. 8. Curiosity Amplifiers
    9. 9. How Gaming Could Change the World • Joy • Relief • Love • Surprise • Pride • Curiosity • Excitement • Awe & Wonder • Contentment • Creativity Jane McGonigal
    10. 10. The Epic Win
    11. 11. Massive Multiplayer Thumb-Wrestling
    12. 12. Jane McGonigal • Joy • Relief • Love • Surprise • Pride • Curiosity • Excitement • Awe & Wonder • Contentment • Creativity
    13. 13. “In times of drastic change, it is the learners who will inherit the future” --LEE COCKRELL “CREATING MAGIC: 10 COMMON SENSE LEADERSHIP STRATEGIES FROM A LIFE AT DISNEY”
    14. 14. “The illiterate of the 21st Century will not be those who cannot read and write, but those who cannot learn, unlearn and relearn.” --A. TOFFLER
    15. 15. Your mission… ◦Become a 21st Century learner ◦Be curious ◦Be resilient ◦Have hope, courage and optimism; you are capable of the epic win! ◦Remember – you are critical and needed by our students every day.
    16. 16. References What is 21st Century Education Video - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ax5cNlutAys John Seeley Brown - http://www.johnseelybrown.com/ Stats on Google - http://www.google.com/about/company/history/ http://investor.google.com/financial/tables.html Stats on Facebook - http://www.theguardian.com/technology/2007/jul/25/media.newmedia http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_Facebook Cell Phones in the Classroom Video - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sfGgRe6YBo0 Jane McGonigal - http://janemcgonigal.com/ Massive Multiplayer Thumb Wrestling - http://www.monochrom.at/daumen/netzwerk-eng.htm

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