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Marketing Class 1
Marketing Class 1
Marketing Class 1
Marketing Class 1
Marketing Class 1
Marketing Class 1
Marketing Class 1
Marketing Class 1
Marketing Class 1
Marketing Class 1
Marketing Class 1
Marketing Class 1
Marketing Class 1
Marketing Class 1
Marketing Class 1
Marketing Class 1
Marketing Class 1
Marketing Class 1
Marketing Class 1
Marketing Class 1
Marketing Class 1
Marketing Class 1
Marketing Class 1
Marketing Class 1
Marketing Class 1
Marketing Class 1
Marketing Class 1
Marketing Class 1
Marketing Class 1
Marketing Class 1
Marketing Class 1
Marketing Class 1
Marketing Class 1
Marketing Class 1
Marketing Class 1
Marketing Class 1
Marketing Class 1
Marketing Class 1
Marketing Class 1
Marketing Class 1
Marketing Class 1
Marketing Class 1
Marketing Class 1
Marketing Class 1
Marketing Class 1
Marketing Class 1
Marketing Class 1
Marketing Class 1
Marketing Class 1
Marketing Class 1
Marketing Class 1
Marketing Class 1
Marketing Class 1
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Marketing Class 1

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  • Welcome
    Intros
    Me – Emerson College, Blue Man, GhostLight Media, PlayMakers
    You -
  • AMA describes marketing as “the activity, set of instructions, and processes for creating, communicating, delivering, and exchanging offerings that have value for customers, clients, partners, and society at large.”
    Or selling stuff
  • What do you think of this statement? - "But in the performing arts, we're not in the business of selling seats. We're in the business of producing and/or presenting art."
    How do you balance art with sales?
  • Let’s discuss the differences here.
  • Marketing is the all encompassing term that we will use, though many times marketing and communications may be split in an organization
    A Director of Audience Development might oversee theatre and patron services
    A communications manager may only really focus on press relations
    Marketing = Sales (Using Communications, Engagement and Sales Tools)
    Communications = Communicating with Current Audiences, Potential Audiences, Press, and (I would argue) internal staff and artists
    Audience Development = More about connections and community and less specifically about sales. More holistic and all encompassing. Commercial theatre might be less about Audience Development and more about marketing.
    Apple uses television commercials to Market (sell) iPhones. It uses press relations to communicate and develop articles, reviews and previews in mainstream publications. But it uses customer service, excellent product, fantastic design to develop audiences. They don’t want to sell just one iPhone, they want a long term relationship.
  • What does Marketing Entail
    Branding - Tone, Institutional Voice
    Advertising - Print, Electronic, Outdoor
    Promotions – Sponsorships, Events, Partnerships
    Communications – Press, Web, Brochure, Emails
    Social Media – Not just marketing
    Box Office – Group Sales, Subscriptions, Single Tickets
    House Staff - Customer Service, Experience
  • Be careful of silos. Often in arts orgs departments become so focused on their areas that they lose sight of the big picture. Development, Marketing, Education, General Management can all be chasing different, yet inter-related goals. The same can happen for Marketing. If Marketing is only about advertising and promotion and not about customer experience then you may be missing an opportunity for Audience Development.
  • Marketing can’t make up for bad product.
    No matter how much money is thrown at it.
    Yes, people make money all the time by selling bad products, but in the long run it doesn’t hold up.
  • Product
    Type - Shakespeare, Opera, Comedy, Dance (Ballet or Modern)
    Brand – MET, Triad Stage, BroadwayExperience – Theater space and amenities, Parking, Smell
    Place
    Where is this being sold?Street, Broadway Theatre, YMCAPrice
    PricingHow much can you charge? How much should you charge?Some price resistance is good
    Don’t undervalue your artDynamic Pricing - We will talk about later
    Promotion
    Most visible AdsDirect MailWebsite
    EmailPublic Relations
  • The four E’s provides a more “Audience Development” experience –
    EXPERIENCE Discover and map out the full Customer Journey on your own brand – in your own country.
    EVERYPLACE Develop your knowledge of new media and channels the way a chef masters new ingredients. Try new things – do something that doesn’t start with TV or print.
    EXCHANGE Appreciate the value of things, not just the cost. Start by calculating the value of your customers – and what their attention, engagement and permission are worth to you.
    EVANGELISM Find the passion and emotion in your brand. Inspire your customers and employees with your passion.
  • Over the past several years people have been talking about the concept of Broaden, Deepen and Diversify. What does that mean?
  • Easier to target individuals now. Vital and getting easier and easier all the time.
    What are your goals – Broaden, Deepen, Diversify?
    Market Segment – Develop a mix of the 4 P’s to market to a particular segment
    Audience research
            Who is buying tickets?
            Age, income, education, race, location
            Beliefs, attitudes, values, opinions
            Lifestyle, interests, activities
            Focus Groups
            Mom’s
    Segment, Mine Data, Leverage Word-of-Mouth and current audiences
            Free Tickets
            Audience Reviews
            Friend Raisings
            List and Ad Trades
  • Branding
        What does your brand say about you?  Identity and Value
            Name, logo and look
            Product, Reputation, History
            Tone and Voice
  • As part of branding – think about your brand in terms of strong positioning statements.
    The Premier Theatre of the Carolina’s
    The State Theatre on North Carolina
    The Triad’s Professional Theatre
  • Sales Force
    How are you selling your product?
    Online
    Phone
    Box Office
    Volunteers
    Phone Centers
    Outside Services (E-Tix, TicketMaster…)
  • When does the experience begin.
    Once the show starts?
    Once you take your seats?
    When you enter the lobby?
    When you park?
    When you order your ticket?
    When you see an advertisement?
  • People buy tickets last minute
    Subscribers are getting older and passing away
    People what more flexibility
    Flex passes are selling well
    Easy exchange policies are vital
    Will Memberships take over subscriptions?
    Don’t forget about group sales
  • Dynamic pricing vs. variable pricing
    Variable pricing is the type of pricing most performing arts organizations already use – Tuesday evenings are cheaper than Saturday nights, The orchestra section is more expensive than balcony.
    Dynamic pricing has created all types of drama. Some people love it and some really, really hate it. It’s based on what the airlines do with their tickets. Based on sales data the price changes over time. So, if a show is selling out, the price increases. Two people sitting beside each other could have paid very different prices. But this really only works where there is some serious demand.
    Discussion
  • Who are they targeting? What are they saying?
  • Who are they targeting? What are they saying?
  • Who are they targeting? What are they saying?
  • Who are they targeting? What are they saying?
  • Who are they targeting? What are they saying?
  • Who are they targeting? What are they saying?
  • Who are they targeting? What are they saying?
  • Who are they targeting? What are they saying?
  • Who are they targeting? What are they saying?
  • So how do you create a marketing plan?
  • Make a plan
    Know what your goals are
    Know how you plan to achieve them
    Know your challenges
    Know your achievements (ROI)
  • Organizational Profile and Audit
    Name, Location, History, etc.
    Current Programs and Projects
    Missions and Goals
    Review of Current Marketing Practices
    Financial Health
  • Environment Analysis
    Demographic
    Local/Regional Developments
    Actions
    Economic
    Trends
    Changes in income
    Actions
    Political
    Legislation
    Agencies
    Actions
    Cultural
    Lifestyle, values
    Actions
  • Challenges and Opportunities
    Challenges
    Declining Subscription Base
    Competition
    Lack of Marketing Technology
    Few Single-Ticket Buyers
    Lack of Diversity
    Marketing Not Targeted
    Lack of Customer Focus
  • Opportunities
    State any Opportunities that might help meet challenges
    State Opportunities as facts
    Potential to increase subscriber base
    Potential to expand technology
    Potential to increase sales
  • Objectives
    Base Objectives on Opportunities
    Increase Subscriber Base by net 5%
    Increase Individual Ticket Sales by 7%
    Invest in Marketing Technologies
  • Marketing Strategy
    Game Plan
    Target Marketing: Who is being targeted?
    Positioning: What is your positioning in the market?
    Product: What do you sell?
    Price: How do you set pricing?
    Distribution: How do you sell?
    Sales Force: Staffing?
    Service: Are you thinking in terms of your customer?
    Promotion: Ads, Communication, Direct Mail (This is the actual media plan)
  • Marketing Process
    This is the blueprint, timeline, and roadmap!
    Detailed Action Plan
    Who, What, When
    Timeline
    Details, Details, Details
    Budget
    How much, where?
  • Controls and Evaluation
    How will you meet your goals?
    How will you manage your progress?
    Can you measure ROI?
    What is success?
  • Don’t Forget The Audience
    Think in terms of audience
    Remember how many distractions there are?
    Think like an onion – You need many layers of communication
    Marketing is about experience
  • Transcript

    • 1. Marketing & Audience Development Shane D. Hudson
    • 2. What is Marketing? “The activity, set of instructions, and processes for creating, communicating, delivering, and exchanging offerings that have value for customers, clients, partners, and society at large.” Selling stuff
    • 3. Marketing is about actively building good, defined, relationships with your audience.
    • 4. Art vs. Cash What Business Are We In?
    • 5. Marketing vs. Communications vs. Audience Development
    • 6. • Marketing = Sales (Using Communications, Engagement and Sales Tools) • Communications = Communicating with Current Audiences, Potential Audiences, Press, and (I would argue) Internal Staff and Artists • Audience Development = More About Connections and Community and Less Specifically About Sales.
    • 7. What Does Audience Development, Communications, and/or Marketing Entail? • Branding - Tone, Institutional Voice • Advertising - Print, Electronic, Outdoor • Promotions – Sponsorships, Events, Partnerships • Communications – Press, Web, Brochure, Emails • Social Media – Not just marketing • Box Office – Group Sales, Subscriptions, Single Tickets • House Staff - Customer Service, Experience
    • 8. Beware of Silos
    • 9. Product Must Meet “Inclined Participants” “Great marketing cannot make a bad script good or a weak performance strong”
    • 10. However… • Patrons are more likely to see anything you produce if you… – Build trust – Create connections – Treat your patrons well
    • 11. The 4 P’s The Marketing Mix
    • 12. The 4 E’s • Experience (Product) • Everyplace (Place) • Exchange (Price) • Evangelism (Promotion)
    • 13. Broaden – Deepen - Diversify • Broaden: attracting more of the same types of the persons already participating • Deepen: increasing the of involvement of participants • Diversify: attracting new types of participants
    • 14. Target Marketing
    • 15. Branding
    • 16. Positioning Statement
    • 17. Sales Force • How are you selling your product? – Online – Phone – Box Office – Volunteers – Phone Centers – Outside Services (E-Tix, TicketMaster…)
    • 18. Service • When does the experience being – Once the show starts? – Once you take your seats? – When you enter the lobby? – When you park? – When you order your ticket? – When you see an advertisement?
    • 19. A Note on Subscribers
    • 20. Dynamic Pricing
    • 21. Marketing Plan
    • 22. MAKE A PLAN –Know what your goals are –Know how you plan to achieve them –Know your challenges –Know your achievements (ROI)
    • 23. Organizational Profile and Audit • Name, Location, History, etc. • Current Programs and Projects • Missions and Goals • Review of Current Marketing Practices • Financial Health
    • 24. Environment Analysis • Demographic – Local/Regional Developments – Actions • Economic – Trends – Changes in income – Actions • Political – Legislation – Agencies – Actions • Cultural – Lifestyle, values – Actions
    • 25. Challenges and Opportunities Challenges – Declining Subscription Base – Competition – Lack of Marketing Technology – Few Single-Ticket Buyers – Lack of Diversity – Marketing Not Targeted – Lack of Customer Focus
    • 26. Challenges and Opportunities Opportunities – State any Opportunities that might help meet challenges – State Opportunities as facts • Potential to increase subscriber base • Potential to expand technology • Potential to increase sales
    • 27. Objectives • Base Objectives on Opportunities – Increase Subscriber Base by net 5% – Increase Individual Ticket Sales by 7% – Invest in Marketing Technologies
    • 28. Marketing Strategy • Game Plan – Target Marketing: Who is being targeted? – Positioning: What is your positioning in the market? – Product: What do you sell? – Price: How do you set pricing? – Distribution: How do you sell? – Sales Force: Staffing? – Service: Are you thinking in terms of your customer? – Promotion: Ads, Communication, Direct Mail (This is the actual media plan)
    • 29. Marketing Process This is the blueprint, timeline, and roadmap! • Detailed Action Plan – Who, What, When • Timeline – Details, Details, Details • Budget – How much, where?
    • 30. Controls and Evaluation • How will you meet your goals? • How will you manage your progress? • Can you measure ROI? • What is success?
    • 31. Don’t Forget The Audience • Think in terms of audience • Remember how many distractions there are? • Think like an onion – You need many layers of communication • Marketing is about experience
    • 32. Don’t Forget! Key Messages & Big Ideas
    • 33. Shane D. Hudson – @shanedhudson (Twitter) – shane@shanedhudson.com – facebook.com/sdhudson

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