Information for 2nd year Medical Students in Cambridge / 2nd year wisdom
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Information for 2nd year Medical Students in Cambridge / 2nd year wisdom

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This is a presentation summarising some of my conclusions after 2nd ye

This is a presentation summarising some of my conclusions after 2nd ye

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  • Very - very well darling!
    I did not get everything but it was quite interesting and I imagine it is most likely very interesting and important for students of that matter....

    Keep up the good work.

    See ya,

    Cousin Peter
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Information for 2nd year Medical Students in Cambridge / 2nd year wisdom Presentation Transcript

  • 1. 2nd Year Wisdom.Info for Cambridge 2nd year medical students and anyone else who’s interested ;-) by Christiane Riedinger 2012
  • 2. Some info upfront.No doubt, 2nd year is challenging, in terms of layout but also in terms of mass.The content to learn is huge: ~200 lectures and practicals with at least 1500 pages of text to absorb.Nothing seems off-limits in exams.Working steadily throughout the year is the only way to get through without a last-minute panic.To sum up:http://www.buzzfeed.com/daves4/30-awesome-teachers-you-wish-you-had
  • 3. Negative marking.Negatively marked exams are scary and unpleasant.But with the right exam technique, everyone can do it.You need to find out how much you know and how well you know it: • Work through the exam content by sets of questions arranged by subject • Answer and highlight the questions of which you are 100% certain (I) • Answer and highlight the questions of which you are not certain but think you know the answer (2) • guess and highlight those questions where you have no clue what the answer is (3)Now evaluate your results. • is the percentage of answers in group (1) high enough? do you get a high enough score to pass? if not, study more... don’t guess more! • does answering the questions in group (2) give you a better or worse score? if yes, you can be more confident. if not, you can’t afford to answer when you’re not 100% sure... study more. • in the exam, you should always leave some answers blank (3), unless you are a genius or an extremely lucky b****rd ;-)
  • 4. The learning curve. (For me, a graduate student not having to write essays and not having any holidays,)Proficiency the learning curve felt really steep all year until very shortly before exams. However these last few weeks/days when you’ve arrived at the shallow bit are the best time to appreciate the connections between the different subjects and lift your knowledge to the next level. Many subjects are interrelated and pulling it all together is the best preparation for the clinical years, so it’s good to arrive there as early as possible. Time to exams (Perhaps the undergrads will reach the shallow bit earlier? I hope so for you guys!)
  • 5. The subjects.A mini-overview of all the subjects and a quick word of advice on each of them:Pathology Pharmacology Neurology Reproductive Biology• Immunology • Drug-Receptor Interactions • Cerebral bloodflow and CSF • Endocrinology• Virology • Neural transmission • Somatic sensation and pain • Ethics• TSEs • Cardiovascular • Motor systems • Sexual Differentiation• Parasitology • Renal • Sensory systems • Gonads, Gametes and ovarian cycle• Fungi • Pharmacokinetics • Development • Fertilisation• Bacteriology • Inflammation • Motivation • Pregnancy• Cardiovascular • Chemotherapy • Mental Illness • Population• Cancer • Memory • STDs Every single word of the • CognitionImmunology is the • Pharmacology Needs the least amount of work of handout can come up in all subjects. No negative marking.most important path the exam, especially thesubject as it is footnotes! The first term is morecontained in all other physiological, the secondsubjects covered Needs by far the most term more psychological,later in the year. Make amount of work, not only but still requiressure you start the because of the negative understanding of complexyear knowing this marking. information.well. Even though there is noNegative marking in negative marking, the openthe exam means you questions require quiteneed to know intense preparation.everything well andwith certainty.
  • 6. The connections.The lines show subjects that are interrelated.Just appreciate the connections, no need to look at the details.Pathology Pharmacology Neurology Reproductive Biology• Immunology • Drug-Receptor Interactions • Cerebral bloodflow and CSF • Endocrinology• Virology • Neural transmission • Somatic sensation and pain • Ethics• TSEs • Cardiovascular • Motor systems • Sexual Differentiation• Parasitology • Renal • Sensory systems • Gonads, Gametes and ovarian cycle• Fungi • Pharmacokinetics • Development • Fertilisation• Bacteriology • Inflammation • Motivation • Pregnancy• Cardiovascular • Chemotherapy • Mental Illness • Population• Cancer • Memory • STDs • Cognition • Pharmacology • NeuroanatomyYou can immediately see that there are no horizontal lines...This is why most things only come together in the end, when you have worked through the whole material.Ideally, subjects should be taught alongside each other, but now you know what to expect.You have to be patient... ;-)
  • 7. The connections. ...more pleasantly displayed showing interrelated topics. Signaling Receptors Pathology Immunology Pharmacology Cardiovascular Bacteriology Parasitology Cancer Chemotherapy Signaling & Receptors some of Virology, TSEs Neural transmission (perhaps these two have the least in common) Inflammation Histopathology Neurology Signaling Immunology Receptors Hypothalamus Pituitary Reproductive Biology & Ethics
  • 8. The connections. ...now the most important connections are highlighted. Signaling Receptors Pathology Immunology Pharmacology Cardiovascular Bacteriology Parasitology Cancer Chemotherapy Signaling and Receptors some of Virology, TSEs Neural transmission (perhaps these two have the least in common) Inflammation Histopathology Neurology Signaling Immunology Receptors Hypothalamus Pituitary Reproductive Biology & Ethics
  • 9. The gist of this introduction. Now we know how things connect, and it is useful to keep this in mind when learning individual subjects throughout the year. Most connections are obvious, so no need to spell them all out in more detail. However, when I was studying, I found myself constantly referring back to a single set of notes no matter what subject I was looking at. These were my notes on signaling and receptors. Out of all the connections between topics, SIGNALING AND RECEPTORS touches on almost every subject in second year. I found it really useful to have all the info about this in a single place. This is what the rest of this presentation is about. Use it as a reference whenever you need to. Hopefully it will save you some time!
  • 10. Signaling and receptors. Cell surface receptors: • Ionotropic receptors • Metabotropic receptors • GPCRs • Tyrosine kinase receptors • Intracellular receptors Cell signaling molecules: • Substances released at the synapse • Arachidonic acid derivatives • Cytokines
  • 11. Signaling and receptors.Remember from 1st year Biochemistry, there was something about G-proteins?This year, G-proteins will become your best friend...Cell surface receptors: • Ionotropic receptors • Metabotropic receptors • GPCRs - this is one of the most important topics this year. • Tyrosine kinase receptors • Intracellular receptorsCell signaling molecules: • Substances released at the synapse • Arachidonic acid derivatives • Cytokines
  • 12. Because they are so important, let’s start off with GPRCs.
  • 13. AHHH! - It’s 6 months later and I have run out of time to finish this presentation!That’s why I’ve now just scanned my most used MODA flashcards on GPCRSin the hope that you find them useful.Stage 2 keeps me pretty busy and I will probably not get back to seriouslycreating more website content until June 2013... SORRY
  • 14. Muscarinic AChRstupid pneumonic: quit it quickly
  • 15. Adrenoreceptorsstupid pneumonic: quit it sufficiently slowly
  • 16. Adenosinereceptorsstupid pneumonic: see simplicity quickly
  • 17. Histamine Receptorsstupid pneumonic: quit smoking immediately (or) quickly
  • 18. Serotonin Receptorsstupid pneumonic: improved quality ion source (my favourite ;-))
  • 19. Opiate Receptorsstupid pneumonic: opiates intoxicate instantly
  • 20. Prostaglandin Receptorsextremely stupid pneumonic: stupid SI unitS
  • 21. Dopamine Receptorsstupid pneumonic: dopamine sucks intensely
  • 22. Angiotensin Receptors
  • 23. Imidazoline Receptors
  • 24. Bradykinin Receptors
  • 25. Endothelin Receptors
  • 26. Purinergic Receptors
  • 27. Other
  • 28. To be continued....