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Published

Journal club: nutrition from Clin Med Journal, RCP-London 2013.

Journal club: nutrition from Clin Med Journal, RCP-London 2013.

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  • 1. Nutrition: an introductionFrom Clin Med; RCP-London 2013 :Prepared by .Dr.Mohamed Al-Shekhani .MBChB-CABM-FRCP-London
  • 2. :Introduction• Now nutrition is a subspecialty in its own right.• Provision of good nutrition is important to all specialties.• Nutritional care is an independent subspecialty practised by a wide range of physicians &now been incorporated into gastroenterological training.
  • 3. :Introduction• Malnutrition is common in hospital inpatients.• 1/3 are at risk.• Evidence for improved outcomes of better nourished patients, BZ of:• Enhanced muscle strength• Better immune function• Better wound healing.• Reduced Hospital stay
  • 4. :The spectrum of nutritional support• Nutritional meals &assistance with eating if required.• Oral supplement feeds.• Enteral tube feeding.• Parenteral nutrition (PN) in intestinal failure.
  • 5. : Hosp Nutritional support teams• Able to provide direct care to the most complex cases requiring enteral feeding & PN.• All clinicians have to develop a basic understanding of good nutritional care.
  • 6. : Nutritional Assessment• In practice, assessment, to identify specific nutrient deficiencies, should be based on a pragmatic approach using a combination of:• History• BMI• Biochemistry.
  • 7. Assessment &indications of Nut support :1.BMI• (BMI): imperfect way of assessment but a useful guide.• BMI < 19 could be at risk of malnutrition, but normal or even raised BMI may be nutritionally deplete if they have lost excessive weight or are lacking in vitamins/ or trace elements.• Historical weight loss can be a better marker of impaired nutrition.• Even 5% hospital weight loss associated with worse clinical outcome.• Weight change during nutritional support (not due to fluid overload) in hospitalised patients can be a useful marker of the effectiveness of the intervention
  • 8. Assessment &indications of Nut support :1.BMI• BMI& reported weight loss are the current favoured method& integral to nutritional screening .• BMI: imperfect way of assessment but a useful guide.• BMI < 19 could be at risk of malnutrition, but normal or even raised BMI may be nutritionally deplete if they have lost excessive weight or are lacking in vitamins/ or trace elements.• Historical weight loss can be a better marker of impaired nutrition.• Even 5% hospital weight loss associated with worse clinical outcome.• Weight change during nut support (not due to fluid overload) in hospitalised patients can be a useful marker of the effectiveness of the intervention.• Malnutrition Universal Screening Tool (MUST), endorsed by many government agencies & professional bodies.
  • 9. Assessment &indications of Nut support :2.BIOCHEM• No reliable biochemical markers of malnutrition identified.• A. Serum albumin is often referred to as a proxy for nutritional status, but not totally accurate as changes in serum albumin usually relate to:• Extravascular shifts in inflammatory states• Altered synthetic function of the liver• Normal plasma albumin are seen in patients with profound anorexia nervosa.• B. Measurement of water& fat-soluble vitamins can demonstrate deficiency, particularly in malabsorptive states, for example after bariatric surgery, but are often normal in individuals with poor nutritional status.• Patients with severe malnutrition can have low levels of intracellular ions (including phosphate, magnesium,potassium) often becoming manifest only when nutritional support is commenced.
  • 10. :Indications of enteral tube feeding• Enteral tube feeding is reserved for patients unable to swallow food safely or if their energy intake remains inadequate.• On occasion, tube feeding can be used to supplement oral intake in patients with high metabolic demands, for instance in patients with cystic fibrosis who are often unable to meet these demands with oral intake.• ‘if the gut works, use it’ otherwise PN.
  • 11. Tube feeding : NGT• For short-term feeding (<6 weeks), NGT or NJT feeding usually suffice.• Nasal tubes can be tolerated for a longer time, it is usually preferable to place a direct gastrostomy or jejunostomy tube in suitable patients who do not tolerate nasal tubes, or require a longer period of enteral feeding.• Postpyloric feeding, either via an endoscopically or surgically placed tube, may help for patients intolerant of intragastric feed (eg diabetic gastroparesis) or at high risk of aspirating stomach contents (eg post-stroke), although its benefit in improving outcomes remains contentious.
  • 12. Tube feeding : Gastrostomy tubes• Endoscopically using a ‘pull through’ technique (PEG).• Under fluoroscopic guidance (RIG) using a gastropexy technique.• PEG placement is generally quicker& easier.• RIG has the advantage of not requiring sedation or gastroscopy.• Enteral feeding is not beneficial in Dementia for improving quality or duration of life.
  • 13. Parenteral nutrition : indications• Intestinal failure.• Expensive & with side-effects.• Via central or peripheral venous access BZ Peripherally delivered PN cause thrombophlebitis& requires the use of PN of low osmolality, so larger volumes can be needed to meet energy requirements.• The preferred central route for those requiring PN for weeks is via peripherally inserted central catheter lines,while tunnelled lines (eg Broviac or Hickman) are the optimum lines for longterm (>3 months) use.
  • 14. :Risks of nutritional support• Related to biochemical excursions or fluid balance problems.• Related to the methods of delivering the artificial nutrition.
  • 15. Risks of nutritional support: biochemical or fluid excursions A.Re-feeding syndrome:• Precipitous drops in plasma phosphate, potassium &magnesium, in individuals who with inadequate oral intake for > five days.• Cautious gradual increases in calorific intake should be employed after appropriate restitution of electrolyte deficiencies.• Overenthusiastic feeding of the malnourished patient orally, enterally or parenterally can lead to an insulin surge with large intracellular shifts of potassium, phosphate and magnesium, leading to low plasma levels of these ions.• Daily measurement of these levels is therefore mandatory.• Increased thiamine use by cells during refeeding can provoke Wernicke’s encephalopathy, so thiamine replacement should always be administered before feeding is started in patients at risk
  • 16. Risks of nutritional support: biochemical or fluid excursions B. Fluid and electrolytes :• PN use can lead to derangements in fluid/electrolyte balance.• Blood and strict fluid balance monitoring is required until the patient is stabilized on PN.
  • 17. Risks of nutritional support: Line &tube - related complications– Risk of aspiration, particularly in those with decreased conscious levels.– Postpyloric feeding may help in high-risk individuals.– Nasal tube complications usually relate to incorrect placement.– All individuals placing &assessing tube position should be aware of current guidelines regarding checking tube position using pH testing, with chest X-ray where uncertainty remains.– Gastrostomy tubes have many more complications, including bleeding or perforation at the time of placement, and infection after placement, often be averted by good aftercare.
  • 18. Risks of nutritional support: Catheter-related sepsis– Catheter-related sepsis (CRS) can cause morbidity or even mortality.– Careful technique when handling these lines can obviate these complications.– If CRS is suspected (eg fever or rigors on feeding), PN should be discontinued& simultaneous line & peripheral cultures taken.– If line sepsis is confirmed, short-term temporary feeding linesshould be removed while longer-term tunnelled lines may be salvaged with antibiotic therapy.
  • 19. Risks of nutritional support: VTE– Long-term feeding catheters can also provoke venous thrombosis necessitating long-term anticoagulation.