Renaissance

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  • Renaissance

    1. 1. Villa RotondaCathedral Sveti Jakov
    2. 2. HistoryArtIntroduction.Characteristics of Renaissance art.ArchitectureIntroduction.Characteristics of Renaissancearchitecture.Example.Interior.Famous peopleLeonardo da Vinci.Michelangelo.
    3. 3. HistoryRenaissance, “Rebirth,"is considered to havestarted in Florence, Italyaround the years 1350 to1400.The start of theRenaissance also was theend of the Middle Ages.the Renaissance was anage in which artistic,social, scientific,and political thoughtturned in
    4. 4. ArtMedieval art tended to bevery flat and nearly alwayshad religious overtones.The Renaissance saw aflourishing of new artistictechniques.Introduction
    5. 5. Characteristics ofRenaissance artPerspectivelight and shadeoptical illusion
    6. 6. Madonna and Child -RAFFAELLO Sanzio
    7. 7. ArchitectureRenaissance architecture is thearchitecture of the periodbetweenthe early 15th and early 17thcenturies in different regionsof Europe.The Renaissance style placesemphasis on symmetry,proportion, geometry and theregularity ofparts as they aredemonstrated in thearchitecture.Orderly arrangements ofcolumns, pilasters and lintels,SantAgostino,Rome,Giacomo diPietrasanta,1483
    8. 8. Characteristics ofRenaissance architecture
    9. 9. The plans of Renaissancebuildings have a square,symmetrical appearancein which proportions areusually based on amodule. Within a churchthe module is often thewidth of an aisle.Sant Andrea, Mantua.
    10. 10. The Roman orders ofcolumns are used:-Tuscan, Doric, Ionic,Corinthian andComposite. During theRenaissance, architectsaimed to use columns,pilasters, andentablatures as anintegrated system.Tuscan order
    11. 11. The dome is usedfrequently, both as avery large structuralfeature that is visiblefrom the exterior, andalso as a means ofroofing smaller spaceswhere they are onlyvisible internally.
    12. 12. Roofs are fitted with flat orcoffered ceilings. They are notleft open as in Medievalarchitecture. They arefrequently painted or decorated.The Sistine Chapel MichelangeloBuonarroti1508 - 1512
    13. 13. External walls aregenerally of highly-finished ashlar masonry,laid in straight courses.Internal walls aresmoothly plastered andsurfaced with white-chalk paint.
    14. 14. Door usually havesquare lintels. Theymay be set within anarch or surmounted bya triangular orsegmental pediment.Openings that do nothave doors are usuallyarched and frequentlyhave a large ordecorative keystone.Ghiberti – Gates ofParadise Baptistry Door,Florence (1425 – 1452)
    15. 15. Windows may be pairedand set within a semi-circular arch. Theyhave square lintels andtriangular or segmentalpediments, which areoften used alternately.Windows are used tobring light into thebuilding and in domesticarchitecture, to giveviews.Stained glass, althoughsometimes present, is
    16. 16. Door usually havesquare lintels. Theymay be set within anarch or surmounted bya triangular orsegmental pediment.Openings that do nothave doors are usuallyarched and frequentlyhave a large ordecorative keystone.Ghiberti – Gates ofParadise Baptistry Door,Florence (1425 – 1452)
    17. 17. Windows may be pairedand set within a semi-circular arch. Theyhave square lintels andtriangular or segmentalpediments, which areoften used alternately.Windows are used tobring light into thebuilding and in domesticarchitecture, to giveviews.Stained glass, althoughsometimes present, is
    18. 18. Building examplesSt. Peters BasilicaSanta Maria Gloriosa
    19. 19. St. Peters BasilicaIs a Late Renaissance churchlocated within Vatican City.Designed principally byDonatoBramante, Michelangelo,Carlo Maderno andGian Lorenzo Bernini.St Peters is the mostrenowned work ofRenaissance architecture andremains one of the largestchurchesin the world.
    20. 20. Interior of the Basilica
    21. 21. Statues in the piersof the domeFrancoisDuquesnoy’ssculpture ofSt. Andrewwas the firstto be started,but it took along time tocomplete. St.Andrew isshown with hischaracteristicX-shapedcross.St. Veronica,by FrancescoMochi. She isdisplaying theVeil ofVeronica (veraicona, or trueicon), whichshe used towipe JesusSt. Helena ofConstantinople,sculpted byAndrea Bolgi (aBernini pupil).Helena was themother ofEmperorConstantine.Made from fourblocks ofmarble.Longinus holdsthe spear withwhich hepierced the sideof Jesus on the
    22. 22. The Sistine ChapelIt is famous for itsarchitecture and itsdecoration that wasfrescoed throughout byRenaissance artistsncluding Michelangelo,Sandro Botticelli,Pietro Perugino,Pinturicchio andothers.
    23. 23. Exterior & Interiorof the Sistine ChapelThe Chapel is a highrectangularbrick building, its exteriorunadorned by architecturalor decorative details.The internal spaces aredividedinto three stories of whichthelowest is huge, with arobustly vaulted basementwith several utilitarianThe ceiling of the chapel is aflattened barrel vaultspringing from a course thatencircles the walls.
    24. 24. Interior
    25. 25. Furniture in this age was crudea massive with classical motifsin reliefs.Chairs became larger and moreornate with high, richly carvedbacks.Tables commonly took arectangular form, with scrollingon the legs.Artists began using marbleor mosaic designs on tabletops.Poorer peoples chairs often cassone: the marriage chestItalian Renaissance CabinetSgabello
    26. 26. Lighting was mainlyobtained throughwindows andclearstories butthese are a fewexamples ofrenaissance inspiredlighting.
    27. 27. richly detaileddesigns ofornaments areperfect examples ofRenaissance styles
    28. 28. Since this era was enjoyedbythe rich, their drapery wereof very lush quality liketapestry, rich velvet orbrocatelle (a type of silkstrengthened withlinen).Untilthe latter part of the 16thcentury in England, windowcurtains were virtually non-existent.When curtains did finallymake an appearance, theywere made from one piece offabric hung on an iron rod
    29. 29. Although their colorsimproved immeasurablyduring the Renaissanceit mirrored that ofmiddle ages.Red: symbolized highsocial status, royalty,Power and prestige. Inthe Church, red was asymbol of authorityother colors includeOrange, Yellow,Green, shades ofbrown, black andPainting of Philip the Good, Duke ofBurgundy by Rogier van der Weyden, from adedication page of the Chroniques deHainault, 1400-1464.
    30. 30. Famous people
    31. 31. Leonardo da VinciLeonardo da Vinci was aFlorentine artist.one of the great mastersof the High Renaissance.who was also celebrated asa painter, sculptor,architect, engineer, andscientist.Leonardo produced arelatively small number ofpaintings, many of whichremained unfinished.he was nevertheless anextraordinarily innovative
    32. 32. Paintings
    33. 33. “A painter should begin every canvas with a wash ofblack, because all things in nature are dark exceptwhere exposed by the light.” ― Leonardo da Vinci“Study without desire spoils the memory, and it retainsnothing that it takes in.” ― Leonardo da Vinci
    34. 34. MichelangeloMichelangelo was born onMarch 6, 1475, in a townnear Florence.Michelangelo couldpossibly be the greatestartist and sculptor whohas ever lived. Hispaintings and sculptureshave changed the meaningof art forever.Michelangelo lived to theage of 89, and died in
    35. 35. Michelangelo’s Works
    36. 36. www.wikipedia.comwww.mrkash.comwww.engineering.comreference

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