Module Three: Working with GroupsCHCGROUP403DPlanandConduct GroupActivities(c) Copyright CTA CHCGROUP403D, MODULE 3 Versio...
GroupsDiscussion: Why do people form groups?2 (c) Copyright CTA CHCGROUP403D, MODULE 3 Version 1 Date: 07/12/2012
Dynamics of GroupsWhat do we mean by group dynamics?• The atmosphere of a group• The actions of a group• The personality t...
Structure of Groups• Formal or informal• Structured• Semi structured• Unstructured• What happens in each of these types of...
Formal Groups• organisation/agenda in place• clear roles for each group member• time frame• refreshments• minutes taking/s...
Formal Meetings• Formal meetings are typical of themanagement of a community serviceorganisation which is a little larger ...
Informal Groups• Group norms established• Encourage brainstorming• Activities which help the group bond likeicebreakers• R...
Group LeadershipKurt Lewins Leadership stylesKurt Lewin and colleagues identified fourleadership styles• Dictator• Autocra...
Dictator Leaders• A leader who uses fear and threats to get thejob done. Dictator leadership has similaritieswith a leader...
Autocratic or Authoritarian Leaders• Under the autocratic leadership styles, alldecision-making powers are centralised in ...
Participative or Democratic Leaders• The democratic leadership style favoursdecision-making by the group, so a leaderwould...
Laissez Faire or Free Rein Leaders• A free rein leader does not lead, but leaves thegroup entirely to itself; such a leade...
Group Leadership cont.The type of leadership styles that organisations haveand individuals may demonstrate vary• The autho...
Effective Communication StrategiesWhat constitutes effective communication in agroup setting?Ability to listenAllowing o...
Organisational Communication• Staff meetings• Emails• Memos• Notice boards• Intranet• Log book/day books• Informal discuss...
Organisation and CommunityResources• Groups are dependent on the organisation andcommunity resources• In the largest sense...
Stages of Group DevelopmentBruce W. Tuckman proposed a theory of groupdevelopment known as:1. Forming – formation of the g...
Supporting Group Activities• How would you support activities for bothformal and informal groups?• What might you need?18 ...
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Ppt chcgroup403 d working with groups v 22.3.13

  1. 1. Module Three: Working with GroupsCHCGROUP403DPlanandConduct GroupActivities(c) Copyright CTA CHCGROUP403D, MODULE 3 Version 1 Date: 07/12/2012
  2. 2. GroupsDiscussion: Why do people form groups?2 (c) Copyright CTA CHCGROUP403D, MODULE 3 Version 1 Date: 07/12/2012
  3. 3. Dynamics of GroupsWhat do we mean by group dynamics?• The atmosphere of a group• The actions of a group• The personality type of a group/influenced by thedominant group within the group• Ages/attitudes/beliefs/cultures• Purpose of a group3 (c) Copyright CTA CHCGROUP403D, MODULE 3 Version 1 Date: 07/12/2012
  4. 4. Structure of Groups• Formal or informal• Structured• Semi structured• Unstructured• What happens in each of these types ofgroups?• If someone calls a meeting but doesn’t havean agenda what kind of meeting would thisbe?4 (c) Copyright CTA CHCGROUP403D, MODULE 3 Version 1 Date: 07/12/2012
  5. 5. Formal Groups• organisation/agenda in place• clear roles for each group member• time frame• refreshments• minutes taking/secretary• distributing minutes• documented procedure according toorganisational policy• checking on actions and feedback loop5 (c) Copyright CTA CHCGROUP403D, MODULE 3 Version 1 Date: 07/12/2012
  6. 6. Formal Meetings• Formal meetings are typical of themanagement of a community serviceorganisation which is a little larger in size• Particularly government departments and notfor profit organisations work with this kind ofa meeting format• These organisations have a high degree ofaccountability6 (c) Copyright CTA CHCGROUP403D, MODULE 3 Version 1 Date: 07/12/2012
  7. 7. Informal Groups• Group norms established• Encourage brainstorming• Activities which help the group bond likeicebreakers• Refreshments• Positive feedback• Equal inclusion of all members• Ownership of action by all• Loose time frames/useful ones7 (c) Copyright CTA CHCGROUP403D, MODULE 3 Version 1 Date: 07/12/2012
  8. 8. Group LeadershipKurt Lewins Leadership stylesKurt Lewin and colleagues identified fourleadership styles• Dictator• Autocratic• Participative• Laissez Faire8 (c) Copyright CTA CHCGROUP403D, MODULE 3 Version 1 Date: 07/12/2012
  9. 9. Dictator Leaders• A leader who uses fear and threats to get thejob done. Dictator leadership has similaritieswith a leader who uses an autocratic style ofleadership, as this style of leader also makesall the decisions9 (c) Copyright CTA CHCGROUP403D, MODULE 3 Version 1 Date: 07/12/2012
  10. 10. Autocratic or Authoritarian Leaders• Under the autocratic leadership styles, alldecision-making powers are centralised in theleader, as mentioned previously such leaders aredictators• They do not entertain any suggestions orinitiatives from subordinates. The autocraticmanagement has been successful as it providesstrong motivation to the manager. It permitsquick decision-making as only one persondecides for the whole group, and keeps it tothemselves until they feel it is needed by the restof the group.• An autocratic leader does not trust anybody10 (c) Copyright CTA CHCGROUP403D, MODULE 3 Version 1 Date: 07/12/2012
  11. 11. Participative or Democratic Leaders• The democratic leadership style favoursdecision-making by the group, so a leaderwould give instruction after consulting thegroup• They can win the cooperation of the groupand can motivate members effectively andpositively.• The decisions of the democratic leader are notunilateral, as with the autocrat, because theyarise from consultation and participation fromthe group members.11 (c) Copyright CTA CHCGROUP403D, MODULE 3 Version 1 Date: 07/12/2012
  12. 12. Laissez Faire or Free Rein Leaders• A free rein leader does not lead, but leaves thegroup entirely to itself; such a leader allowsmaximum freedom to the group• They are given a freehand in deciding theirown policies and methods. Free reinleadership style is considered better than theauthoritarian style, however it may beconsidered not as effective as the democraticstyle12 (c) Copyright CTA CHCGROUP403D, MODULE 3 Version 1 Date: 07/12/2012
  13. 13. Group Leadership cont.The type of leadership styles that organisations haveand individuals may demonstrate vary• The authoritarian leadership style, for example, isapproved in periods of crisis but fails to win the"hearts and minds" of their followers in the day-to-day management.• The democratic leadership style can be effective insituations that require consensus building; and finally,• The laissez faire leadership style is appreciated bythe degree of freedom it provides, but as the leaderdoes not "take charge" they can be perceived as afailure in protracted or thorny organisationalproblems13 (c) Copyright CTA CHCGROUP403D, MODULE 3 Version 1 Date: 07/12/2012
  14. 14. Effective Communication StrategiesWhat constitutes effective communication in agroup setting?Ability to listenAllowing others to speak and express their opinionsDrawing out other people to help them expressthemselvesKeeping to the pointInvolving all group participants on an equal levelNon-offensive languageStyle of speechRespectful attitudes14 (c) Copyright CTA CHCGROUP403D, MODULE 3 Version 1 Date: 07/12/2012
  15. 15. Organisational Communication• Staff meetings• Emails• Memos• Notice boards• Intranet• Log book/day books• Informal discussions• Hand over information15 (c) Copyright CTA CHCGROUP403D, MODULE 3 Version 1 Date: 07/12/2012
  16. 16. Organisation and CommunityResources• Groups are dependent on the organisation andcommunity resources• In the largest sense unless a community hastransport, people may not be able to gettogether at all• Group success may be dependent on materialsfor example for art therapy would needpainting equipment, paper and pen,computers, appropriate venue16 (c) Copyright CTA CHCGROUP403D, MODULE 3 Version 1 Date: 07/12/2012
  17. 17. Stages of Group DevelopmentBruce W. Tuckman proposed a theory of groupdevelopment known as:1. Forming – formation of the group, getting together2. Storming – brainstorming ideas3. Norming – normalising processes and tasks4. Performing – putting it into action5. Adjourning/mourning – closure of group17 (c) Copyright CTA CHCGROUP403D, MODULE 3 Version 1 Date: 07/12/2012
  18. 18. Supporting Group Activities• How would you support activities for bothformal and informal groups?• What might you need?18 (c) Copyright CTA CHCGROUP403D, MODULE 3 Version 1 Date: 07/12/2012

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