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Module 5 counselling to suit the client part b
Module 5 counselling to suit the client part b
Module 5 counselling to suit the client part b
Module 5 counselling to suit the client part b
Module 5 counselling to suit the client part b
Module 5 counselling to suit the client part b
Module 5 counselling to suit the client part b
Module 5 counselling to suit the client part b
Module 5 counselling to suit the client part b
Module 5 counselling to suit the client part b
Module 5 counselling to suit the client part b
Module 5 counselling to suit the client part b
Module 5 counselling to suit the client part b
Module 5 counselling to suit the client part b
Module 5 counselling to suit the client part b
Module 5 counselling to suit the client part b
Module 5 counselling to suit the client part b
Module 5 counselling to suit the client part b
Module 5 counselling to suit the client part b
Module 5 counselling to suit the client part b
Module 5 counselling to suit the client part b
Module 5 counselling to suit the client part b
Module 5 counselling to suit the client part b
Module 5 counselling to suit the client part b
Module 5 counselling to suit the client part b
Module 5 counselling to suit the client part b
Module 5 counselling to suit the client part b
Module 5 counselling to suit the client part b
Module 5 counselling to suit the client part b
Module 5 counselling to suit the client part b
Module 5 counselling to suit the client part b
Module 5 counselling to suit the client part b
Module 5 counselling to suit the client part b
Module 5 counselling to suit the client part b
Module 5 counselling to suit the client part b
Module 5 counselling to suit the client part b
Module 5 counselling to suit the client part b
Module 5 counselling to suit the client part b
Module 5 counselling to suit the client part b
Module 5 counselling to suit the client part b
Module 5 counselling to suit the client part b
Module 5 counselling to suit the client part b
Module 5 counselling to suit the client part b
Module 5 counselling to suit the client part b
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Module 5 counselling to suit the client part b

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  • 1. Module 5 Part B:Using the Right Counselling TechniqueCHCCSL506AApply counselling therapies to address arange of client issues
  • 2. 2Unit Description• This unit describes the knowledge and skills relating to usinga range of counselling techniques to assist clients in dealingwith a variety of life issues(c) Copyright CTA CHCCSL506A, MODULE 5 Part B Version Date: 10.3.13
  • 3. 3Use techniques from a range of counsellingtechniques• 1.1 Work with knowledge of at least five counsellingtechniques• 1.2 Identify the applications, benefits and limitations ofcommon counselling techniques in the context of own workrole• 1.3 Demonstrate the application of counselling techniquesand processes from these approaches• 1.4 Combine counselling techniques and processes fromdifferent approaches in an effective way(c) Copyright CTA CHCCSL506A, MODULE 5 Part B Version Date: 10.3.13
  • 4. 4ASummary of Contemporary CounsellingModels1. PsychoanalyticPsychotherapy2. Behaviourism3. Humanistic counselling –Cognitive Therapy4. Person-centeredpsychotherapy5. Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs6. Gestalt therapy – the ‘aha’experience(c) Copyright CTA CHCCSL506A, MODULE 5 Part B Version Date: 10.3.13
  • 5. 5ASummary of Contemporary CounsellingModels cont.7. Neuro LinguisticProgramming8. Cognitive BehaviouralCounselling or Therapy (CBT)9. Narrative Therapy10. Solution Focused Therapy11. Emotional ReleaseCounselling12. Hypnosis and GuidedImagery Techniques(c) Copyright CTA CHCCSL506A, MODULE 5 Part B Version Date: 10.3.13
  • 6. 6ASummary of Contemporary CounsellingModels cont.13. Eye-MovementDesensitisation andReprocessing (EMDR)14. Thought-field therapy15. Brain Gym16. Be Set Free Fast17. TheoPhostic Ministry(Spiritual Healing Technique)(c) Copyright CTA CHCCSL506A, MODULE 5 Part B Version Date: 10.3.13
  • 7. 71. Psychoanalytic psychotherapy• Sigmund Freud• ID– Base desires• EGO– Our conscious mind• SUPEREGO– Our conscience(c) Copyright CTA CHCCSL506A, MODULE 5 Part B Version Date: 10.3.13
  • 8. 8• B.F.Skinner• Watson• We are stimulus/responsecreatures… we movetowards reward and avoidpunishment• Thinking… is a nonsenseconcept(c) Copyright CTA CHCCSL506A, MODULE 5 Part B Version Date: 10.3.132. Behaviourism
  • 9. 93. Humanistic counselling – Cognitive Therapy• In the 1950s, both Psychoanalytictheory and Behaviourism werechallenged by humanist thoughtas being too pessimistic abouthuman nature.• Humanism is a theoreticalorientation that emphasises theunique qualities of humans,especially their freedom and theirpotential for personal growth.(c) Copyright CTA CHCCSL506A, MODULE 5 Part B Version Date: 10.3.13
  • 10. 10Humanist contribution• Carl Rogers and AbrahamMaslow took an optimisticview of human nature.• They forged the basis ofCognitive Therapy, whichemphasises the importanceof thinking and changingour thinking in order toinfluence positive humanbehaviour.(c) Copyright CTA CHCCSL506A, MODULE 5 Part B Version Date: 10.3.13
  • 11. 114. Person-centered psychotherapy• Person-Centered Therapy(PCT), also known asClient-centered therapy orRogerian Psychotherapy,was developed by thehumanist psychologist CarlRogers in the 1940s and1950s.• It is one of the most widelyused models in mentalhealth and psychotherapy.(c) Copyright CTA CHCCSL506A, MODULE 5 Part B Version Date: 10.3.13
  • 12. 12Person Centered Therapy• The basic elements ofRogerian therapy involveshowing congruence(genuineness), empathy,and unconditional positiveregard towards a client.• Based on these elementsthe therapist creates asupportive, non-judgmentalenvironment in which theclient is encouraged toreach their full potential.(c) Copyright CTA CHCCSL506A, MODULE 5 Part B Version Date: 10.3.13
  • 13. 13How it works…• PCT is used to help a person achievepersonal growth and/or come to termswith a specific event or problem.• PCT is based on the principle of talkingtherapy and is a non-directive approach.• The therapist encourages the client toexpress their feelings and does notsuggest how the person might wish tochange, but by listening and thenmirroring back what the client reveals tothem, helps them to explore andunderstand their feelings for themselves.(c) Copyright CTA CHCCSL506A, MODULE 5 Part B Version Date: 10.3.13
  • 14. 14The client decides…• The client is then able todecide what kind ofchanges they would like tomake and can achievepersonal growth.• Although this technique hasbeen criticized by some forits lack of structure and setmethod, it has proved to bea hugely effective andpopular treatment.(c) Copyright CTA CHCCSL506A, MODULE 5 Part B Version Date: 10.3.13
  • 15. 15The 6 conditions for change1. Therapist-ClientPsychological Contact• A relationship betweenclient and therapist mustexist.• It must be a relationshipin which each personsperception of the other isimportant.(c) Copyright CTA CHCCSL506A, MODULE 5 Part B Version Date: 10.3.13
  • 16. 166 conditions cont.2. Client incongruence orVulnerability• That incongruence existsbetween the client’sexperience andawareness.• Furthermore, the client isvulnerable to anxietywhich motivates them tostay in the relationship.(c) Copyright CTA CHCCSL506A, MODULE 5 Part B Version Date: 10.3.13
  • 17. 176 conditions cont.3. Therapist congruenceor Genuineness• The therapist iscongruent within thetherapeutic relationship.• The therapist is deeplyhis or herself - they arenot “acting” - and theycan draw on their ownexperiences (self-disclosure) to facilitatethe relationship.(c) Copyright CTA CHCCSL506A, MODULE 5 Part B Version Date: 10.3.13
  • 18. 186 conditions cont.4. Therapist UnconditionalPositive Regard (UPR)• The therapist accepts theclient unconditionally,without judgment,disapproval or approval.• This facilitates increasedself-regard in the client,as they can begin tobecome aware ofexperiences in which theirview of self-worth wasdistorted by others.(c) Copyright CTA CHCCSL506A, MODULE 5 Part B Version Date: 10.3.13
  • 19. 196 conditions cont.5. Therapist Empathicunderstanding• The therapist experiences anempathic understanding ofthe client’s internal frame ofreference.• Accurate empathy on thepart of the therapist helps theclient believe the therapist’sunconditional love for them.(c) Copyright CTA CHCCSL506A, MODULE 5 Part B Version Date: 10.3.13
  • 20. 206 conditions cont.6. Client Perception• That the client perceives, toat least a minimal degree,the therapist’s UnconditionalPositive Regard andempathic understanding.(c) Copyright CTA CHCCSL506A, MODULE 5 Part B Version Date: 10.3.13
  • 21. 215. Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs(c) Copyright CTA CHCCSL506A, MODULE 5 Part B Version Date: 10.3.13Self-actualizationNeedsSelf-esteemNeedsLove and BelongingnessNeedsSafety NeedsPhysiological NeedsCurrently unsatisfied but felt needs are “Motivators”
  • 22. 226. Gestalt therapy – the ‘aha’experience(c) Copyright CTA CHCCSL506A, MODULE 5 Part B Version Date: 10.3.13• Frederick (Fritz) Perlsfounded the Gestalt Therapywhich emphasizes the present‘here and now’.• Perls encouraged clients totake responsibility for theiractions without blaming eitherthe past or others• He concentrated on raisingclient’s awareness of currentbodily sensations, emotionalfeelings and related thoughts
  • 23. 237. Neuro linguistic programming (NLP)• NLP has three main elements:– The ‘Neuro’ refers to neurologyi.e. how mind and body arelinked through the nervoussystem.– The ‘Linguistics’ is aboutlanguage i.e. how we influenceeach other and ourselves by theuse of language.– The ‘Programing’ is aboutrepeated sequences of thoughtand behaviour i.e. how we act togain our goals and theconsequences of our actions.(c) Copyright CTA CHCCSL506A, MODULE 5 Part B Version Date: 10.3.13
  • 24. 248. Cognitive Behavioural Counselling orTherapy (CBT)• Albert Ellis• The ABC system!• Change the way you think…change the way you feel andact…• Many counsellors use CBT… itis one of the most researchedtherapeutic interventions(c) Copyright CTA CHCCSL506A, MODULE 5 Part B Version Date: 10.3.13
  • 25. 25ABC (and D & E)(c) Copyright CTA CHCCSL506A, MODULE 5 Part B Version Date: 10.3.13
  • 26. 269. Narrative therapy• ‘Storying’• Lewis and Butler practicedwhat they called ‘life reviewtherapy’• David Epston and MichaelWhite continued to developthis• Alternate life scripts… whereyou don’t play the victim… oraggressor(c) Copyright CTA CHCCSL506A, MODULE 5 Part B Version Date: 10.3.13
  • 27. 27Narrative Therapy• The problem is theproblem, as opposed to theperson being the problem• E.g. “When did thedepression first come…”instead of “When did youfirst get depressed…”• This language changeexternalises rather thaninternalises the problem(c) Copyright CTA CHCCSL506A, MODULE 5 Part B Version Date: 10.3.13
  • 28. 2810. Solution focused therapy• Milton Erickson placedemphasis on turning perceiveddeficits into resources• ‘Amplify what is already working,look for times when the clienthas been successful in the pastand for times when the client hasused coping skills successfully’• St Luke’s Innovative Resourceswhich include the Strength andBear Cards series• www.stlukes.org.au• or phone 03 54401100(c) Copyright CTA CHCCSL506A, MODULE 5 Part B Version Date: 10.3.13
  • 29. 2911. Emotional release counselling(c) Copyright CTA CHCCSL506A, MODULE 5 Part B Version Date: 10.3.13• Patricia and MichaelNolan• This therapy builds on thenotion that our problems aredue to repressed emotion,and that by expressing theemotion we can resolveissues• www.turnarounddevelopment.com.au/cal1.html
  • 30. 3012. Hypnosis and guided imagery techniques(c) Copyright CTA CHCCSL506A, MODULE 5 Part B Version Date: 10.3.13• Hypnosis is based on theassumption that the rigidityof the conscious mind blockspainful memories or ways ofthinking, which, if unblocked,may lead to a cessation ofpainful emotions.• Therapy is therapist-led…and moves clients intodeeper states of relaxationuntil they are in asuggestible state.
  • 31. 3113. Eye-Movement Desensitisation andReprocessing (EMDR)• Francine Shapiro• Simulating Rapid Eye Movement insleep cycle… assisting the brain tomake sense of traumatic ordisturbing events, imagery, sounds,feeling, meaning.(c) Copyright CTA CHCCSL506A, MODULE 5 Part B Version Date: 10.3.13
  • 32. 32EMDR explained…• EMDR is primarily used fortrauma reduction• The eye movements tend totake the client back to theoriginal distressing event thatwasn’t ‘processed’ and helpsthe brain to make sense of itin a more positive way• This in effect puts the trauma‘to bed’ and allows the personto live without the eventblockage which tends todominate their lives(c) Copyright CTA CHCCSL506A, MODULE 5 Part B Version Date: 10.3.13
  • 33. 33EMDR continued• EMDR has beensuccessfully used for painrelief for chronic painsufferers as pain issomewhat similar to traumain its impact on the nervoussystem• EMDR can also be used forself esteem and a myriad ofother issues. It is a “miracletherapy”.(c) Copyright CTA CHCCSL506A, MODULE 5 Part B Version Date: 10.3.13
  • 34. 3414. Thought field therapy(c) Copyright CTA CHCCSL506A, MODULE 5 Part B Version Date: 10.3.13• Dr. Callahan – the author• This intervention is designedto stimulate different parts ofthe brain, such as touch,singing, reciting, movementetc. These reduce distress forthe client.• The algorithm is a tappingsequence which is performedon the Meridian points aroundthe head, top half of the bodyand the hands.
  • 35. 3515. Brain gym• Dr. Paul Dennison, a pioneerin the field of applied brainresearch.• Brain Gym is a programconsisting of 26 simple and funphysical activities designed toenhance connections of thebrain’s neural pathways andintegrate the entire brain.• The end result is an increasedability to learn and improvedperformance.(c) Copyright CTA CHCCSL506A, MODULE 5 Part B Version Date: 10.3.13
  • 36. 36Brain Gym(c) Copyright CTA CHCCSL506A, MODULE 5 Part B Version Date: 10.3.13• Brain Gym consists ofsimple movements, manysimilar to thoseaccomplished by childrenas they go through variousstages of development.
  • 37. 3716. Be set free fast(c) Copyright CTA CHCCSL506A, MODULE 5 Part B Version Date: 10.3.13• Dr Larry Nims PhD• BSFF is an Energy Therapymethod for eliminating theemotional roots and self-limiting belief systems thatare embedded in thesubconscious mind, andwhich automaticallydetermine and control mostof our experience, self-expression and behavior.
  • 38. 38BSFF• This therapy involvestapping while repeatingpositive statements aboutthe ‘self’.• BSFF is an adapted versionof thought field therapy.(simpler)(c) Copyright CTA CHCCSL506A, MODULE 5 Part B Version Date: 10.3.13
  • 39. 3917. TheoPhostic Ministry (spiritual healing)(c) Copyright CTA CHCCSL506A, MODULE 5 Part B Version Date: 10.3.13• Dr Ed Smith• ‘Lies’ or negative beliefs we holdabout ourselves are at the basisof our emotional pain and not theactual event.• Pinpointing the lies in time andinviting God to bring truth andlight to these events brings lastingchange to negative feelings,thoughts and behaviours, saysthe author – a Christian Ministerand psychologist.
  • 40. 40Traditional Spiritual Healing• Many cultures and traditions havetheir own Spiritual Healers whopractice a combination of ritual andherb medicine interventions withgreat impact for the sufferer.• While in some cultures this may beseen as superstition and not helpful,if the person themselves holds adeep belief about the usefulness oftreatment, then we know that thesubconscious mind is able torespond in quite a miraculous way!(c) Copyright CTA CHCCSL506A, MODULE 5 Part B Version Date: 10.3.13
  • 41. 41Confirm suitability of counselling techniques inspecific situations• 2.1 Clarify specific client needs and issues and agreeddesired changes to be addressed, including analysis ofclient’s developmental status and response to change• 2.2 Identify application and limitations of identifiedcounselling techniques in addressing client needs, issues andgoals• 2.3 Identify client and counsellor roles in therapeutic processin relation to a range of counselling techniques• 2.4 Identify own level of comfort and/or issues in relation tousing identified counselling techniques• 2.5 Select most appropriate counselling technique(s) forapplication in identified situations(c) Copyright CTA CHCCSL506A, MODULE 5 Part B Version Date: 10.3.13
  • 42. 42Finding the right therapy…• It is always important to find theright therapy for your client• Not all people are the same• People of different agesappreciate different styles ofcounselling• We all as counsellors have ourpreferences… but it is alwaysabout matching the rightintervention with the personbefore us… their personality,presenting issue andexpectation.(c) Copyright CTA CHCCSL506A, MODULE 5 Part B Version Date: 10.3.13• At the end of the day, weneed to be confident inwhat we do!
  • 43. 43Apply counselling techniques to address specificclient issues and/or needs• 3.1 Demonstrate appropriate and effective use of counsellingtechniques in assisting clients to deal with a range of issues• 3.2 Use counselling skills appropriately in the context of eachcounselling modality and technique• 3.3 Explain rationale for using specific techniques andevaluate effectiveness of the technique in context• 3.4 Review own role as counsellor and in applying eachtechnique and identify areas for improvement and/or changesin approach for the future• 3.5 Identify indicators of client issues requiring referral andreport or refer appropriately, in line with organisationrequirements(c) Copyright CTA CHCCSL506A, MODULE 5 Part B Version Date: 10.3.13
  • 44. 44Practice, practice, practice…• Throughout this course you will be introduced to a range oftherapeutic interventions.• You will have a chance to learn them, practice them withscenarios and then with real clients… usually your fellowstudents.• It is important that you are willing to be a guinea pig in theprocess…• Pick smaller issues that you don’t mind sharing with fellowstudents…• If you need counselling for larger issues… speak to yourtrainer.(c) Copyright CTA CHCCSL506A, MODULE 5 Part B Version Date: 10.3.13

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