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Photojournalism e dited

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Published in: Art & Photos, News & Politics

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  • 1. a representation of a person or scene recorded by a camera on light-sensitive material (digital censor)
  • 2. the timely reporting of events at the local, provincial, national and international levels. Relevant.
  • 3. the images have meaning in the context of a recently published record of events. SOLDIERS AFGHANISTAN WAR
  • 4. the situation implied by the images is a fair and accurate representation of the events they depict in both content and tone POST-ELECTION PROTEST, IRAN
  • 5. the images combine with other news elements to make facts relatable to the viewer or reader on a cultural level. DHARAVI SLUM, MUMBAI
  • 6. GAZA STRIP, JERUSALEM
  • 7. A photojournalist uses words to tell a pictures instead of story. They can also accompany their images with some text to elaborate on the details or events.
  • 8. WORLD PRESS PHOTO OF THE YEAR SHOUTING PROTESTS FROM ROOFTOPS, IRAN
  • 9. Henri Cartier-Bresson
  • 10. Eddie Adams Mathew Brady Danny Lyon Jacob Riis Susan Meiselas Steve Mccurry James Nachtwey Diane Arbus Robert Capa Sebastião Salgado Henri CartierBresson Walker Evans W. Eugene Smith Peter Turnley Gordon Parks Lauren Greenfield Ed Kashi André Lewis Hines
  • 11. AMERICAN PHOTOGRAPHER
  • 12. EXPOSED CHILD LABOUR PRACTICES
  • 13. BECAUSE OF HIM, LAWS WERE CHANGED
  • 14. BRAZILIAN PHOTOJOURNALIST
  • 15. Photo essays are most dynamic when you as the photographer about the care subject. Make your topic something in which interest. you find
  • 16. you document For example, if a newborn’s first month, spend time with the family. Discover who the parents are, what culture they are from, whether they are upper or lower class. These factors will help you in planning type of shots you set up for out the your story.
  • 17. After your research, you can determine the angle you want to take your story. The main factors of each story create an incredibly story. unique
  • 18. Joy. Fear. Hurt. Excitement. The best way you connect your photo essay with its audience is to draw out the emotions can within the story and utilize them in your shots. This does not mean that you manipulate your audience’s emotions. You merely use emotion as a connecting point
  • 19. Visualize each shot of the story, or simply walk through the venue/place/event in your mind, you will want to think about the type of shots that will work best to tell your story.
  • 20. Try to avoid posed photos. No Snapshots! Try to capture emotion. Photograph faces not backs. Let your picture tell the story. Use different angles and perspectives. Avoid inanimate objects. Focus on people. Don’t forget the Rule of Thirds. The Decisive Moment
  • 21. In The Fray Media Storm (audio & visual) Blue Eyes Magazine File Magazine Social Documentary.net Lunatic Travel Photography Network Colours Magazine F-Stop Magazine Deep Sleep Vewd See Saw Lens Culture & Interviews The Digital Journalist Photo Eye Magazine Aperture.org Reuters