Catalog of the Future

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Ideas for making library catalogs and library webpages more like Web 2.0. Presented at Wesleyan University Library, April 3, 2007.

Ideas for making library catalogs and library webpages more like Web 2.0. Presented at Wesleyan University Library, April 3, 2007.

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  • 1. Catalog of the Future Sally Grucan Wesleyan University Library April 3, 2007
  • 2. Marshall Breeding. Trends in Library Automation: Meeting the Challenges of a New Generation of Library Users.” OCLC Office of Research, Distinguished Seminar Series, Nov. 29, 2006. http://www.oclc.org/research/dss/ppt/breeding.ppt
  • 3. OCLC. Perceptions of libraries and information resources: a report to the OCLC membership . 2005. http://www.oclc.org/reports/2005perceptions.htm
  • 4. Revitalizing the Research Library Catalog Karen Calhoun. The Changing Nature of the Catalog and its Integration with Other Discovery Tools: Final Report, March 17, 2006 , p. 11, fig. 1. Prepared for the Library of Congress. http://www.loc.gov/catdir/calhoun-report-final.pdf
  • 5. Marshall Breeding. Trends in Library Automation: Meeting the Challenges of a New Generation of Library Users.” OCLC Office of Research, Distinguished Seminar Series, Nov. 29, 2006. http://www.oclc.org/research/dss/ppt/breeding.ppt
  • 6.
    • “ To ask catalogs to serve as portals to the Web is asking too much of them, just as asking portals to serve as catalogs of ‘the non-Web’ is asking too much of them.”
    • Brian E.C. Schottlaender commentary to “The catalog as portal to the internet” by Sarah E. Thomas, LC Bicentennia Conference on Bibliographic Control for the New Millennium: Confronting the Challenges of Networked Resources and the Web” http://www.loc.gov/catdir/bibcontrol/schottlaender_paper.html
  • 7. Two-part discovery model
    • A. Library as search destination
    • B. Library as source of discovery
  • 8. Library discovery model, part A Marshall Breeding. Trends in Library Automation: Meeting the Challenges of a New Generation of Library Users.” OCLC Office of Research, Distinguished Seminar Series, Nov. 29, 2006. http://www.oclc.org/research/dss/ppt/breeding.ppt
  • 9. Libraries GOOGLEZON! http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2005/11/photogalleries/godzilla/
  • 10. Google Book Search
  • 11. Google Book Search single record http://books.google.com/
  • 12. Google Book Search scroll down
  • 13. Amazon.com
  • 14. LibX toolbar in Firefox Maryville University Library’s use of LibX toolbar in Firefox. More info: http://www.maryville.edu/library/libx/default.asp Results in Maryville catalog have link back to Firefox
  • 15. How do they do it?
    • Web services are technologies allowing applications (software that performs a task) to communicate across platforms (hardware/software framework which allows software to run) and programming languages using standard protocols based on XML (eXtensible Markup Language).
  • 16. Approaches to finding information
    • Bibliographic surrogates (catalogs, abstracting & indexing)
    • Computational, content-based techniques that compare queries to parts of the actual works (full-text searching)
    • Social processes that consider works in relation to the user and his/her characteristics and history, to other works, and to the behavior of other communities of users (reviews, citation indexes, suggestions from colleagues, web communities)
    Calhoun, Karen. The Changing Nature of the catalog and its integration with other discovery tools: final report, March 17, 2006 . Prepared for the Library of Congress. http://www.loc.gov/catdir/calhoun-report-final.pdf
  • 17. Users like
    • Single search box
    • Default AND Boolean operator
    • Spell-checking
    • Relevance ranking, Google-like post-Boolean methods
    • Clustering of results, e.g. FRBR-ized
    • Help in refining search results, e.g. facets
    • Standardized searching techniques
    • Retrieve something
    • Friendly messages (“Did you mean? “More like this?” “People interested in this also liked”)
    • Enhanced records
    • Visualization, e.g. tag clouds
    • Link to full text whenever possible
    • No need to repeat the search in different systems; federated searching
    • Social networking: tagging, rating, reviews, bookmarking
  • 18. WorldCat.org
  • 19. WorldCat.org single record “find in a library” results
  • 20. WorldCat.org single record in my library
  • 21. OCLC Fiction Finder search http://fictionfinder.oclc.org/
  • 22. OCLC Fiction Finder results
  • 23. OCLC Fiction Finder all editions
  • 24. OCLC Fiction Finder single record
  • 25. Library discovery model, part B Marshall Breeding. Trends in Library Automation: Meeting the Challenges of a New Generation of Library Users.” OCLC Office of Research, Distinguished Seminar Series, Nov. 29, 2006. http://www.oclc.org/research/dss/ppt/breeding.ppt
  • 26. NCSU Endeca catalog http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/catalog/
  • 27. Plymouth State U. experimental “Scriblio” catalog based on WordPress (open-source blog management application) Created by Casey Bisson http://www.plymouth.edu/library/opac/
  • 28.  
  • 29.  
  • 30. U.Rochester CUIPID experimental catalog CUIPID project http://docushare.lib.rochester.edu/docushare/dsweb/Get/Document-18040/CUIPID%20Project.ppt
  • 31. Koha open-source catalog repackaged by LibLime http://zoomopac.liblime.com/ . Implementation at Nelsonville Public Library http ://search.athenscounty.lib.oh.us/cgi-bin/koha/opac-main.pl
  • 32. Koha single record with Amazon data
  • 33. Serial record family tree based on 76x linking fields in bib records Washington State Library Newspapers http://www.secstate.wa.gov/library/docs/iii/seattlepi.htm
  • 34. Library homepage Extremely compact Brigham Young University Library’s homepage http://www.lib.byu.edu/
  • 35. Incorporating the catalog
  • 36. U. Minnesota Undergraduate Virtual Library http://www.lib.umn.edu/undergrad/
  • 37.
    • “… decouple the user experience layer from the library’s back-office functions, separating data creation and maintenance from its discovery.”  
    • Michael Kaplan. OPAC 2.0 and beyond: can librarians succeed as counter-counter revolutionaries? NELINET 2006. http://www.nelinet.net/edserv/conf/cataloging/opac06/kaplan.ppt
  • 38. Primo from Ex Libris
    • End-user discovery tool for library-selected resources
    • Optimizes searches for locally-controlled resources that can be harvested (“just in case” processing): catalogs, databases, local digitized collections
    • Harvests remote collections, e.g. content available thorugh Open Archives Initiative Protocol for Metadata Harvesting (OAI)
    • Uses MetaLib to perform searches on remote databases (“just in time” federated searching)
    • Indexes and displays results together:
      • Normalizes records
      • Enriches the source data with covers, TOC’s, etc.
      • Dedups and creates FRBR-ized groups
    • Toolbar may be embedded in Google, etc. (like LibX)
    • http://www.exlibrisgroup.com/resources/various/primo_A4.pdf
  • 39. John Webb. Lib 2.0: Hip or Hype, WSU Libraries Learning Break, May 26, 2006, Washington State U. www.wsulibs.wsu.edu/usered/learnbreak/materials/web2. ppt
  • 40. Primo search screen Tamar Sadeh, with Michael Kaplan and Ex Libris staff. Primo: an exclusive peek from Ex Libris , recording of a webinar held May 9, 2006. Register at http://www.exlibrisgroup.com/webinar_1144862525.htm
  • 41. Primo search screen with MetaLib
  • 42. Results FRBRized grouping Appropriate access: location, player, or viewer
  • 43. Single record with SFX button
  • 44. Single record for a book
  • 45. User can add reviews and tags
  • 46. Tagging help
  • 47. No dead ends
  • 48. Search view customizable
  • 49. Library staff participation, too
    • Make personal and public recommendations of sources and articles
    • Expose library’s selection processes
    • Expose library expertise
    • Cody Hanson. A Lesson from Web. 2.0 for Academic Libraries, http ://codyhanson.com/CodyHansonCIC032007.ppt , slide #19. Presented at CIC Library Conference “Getting in the Flow,” Mar. 19-20, 2007. Referring to the functionality of Digg.com
  • 50. Catalog ing of the future
    • Better sense of user needs and costs to determine what needs to be cataloged or cataloged at what level/with what metadata/in which database
    • Any metadata is good. Record entered at time of selection/order can be upgraded automatically over time (Bib Notification, Marcadia)
    • Inadequacy and inflexibility of AACR2/RDA and MARC. Many access points unused.
    • LC cutting back
    • Root out redundancy
    • Dramatically increase cooperative cataloging in WorldCat
    • Less emphasis on description, more on discovery and access
  • 51. Andrew Pace on NCSU catalog
    • 2/3 of users do a plain search without refinements
    • 25% do a search with some navigation
    • 8% do pure navigation (browse); mostly looking at “new books” option
    • Most-used refinements: LC class and LCSH
    • 1/2 of navigation is subject-based
    • Most searches are keyword
    • 4% subject searches
    • 8% author searches
    Andrew Pace. “The promise and paradox of bibliographic control.” Library of Congress Working Group on the Future of Bibliographic Control, March 8, 2007. Karen Coyle blog http ://kcoyle.blogspot.com/
  • 52.
    • “ Research libraries are spending a fortune on creating metadata that is mismatched to our users’ needs.”
    • Bernie Hurley. “Users and uses, research libraries” section, Library of Congress Working Group on the Future of Bibliographic Control, Mar. 8, 2007. Karen Coyle blog http://kcoyle.blogspot.com
  • 53. Role of metadata
    • Must primarily facilitate document-selection decisions . Qualify retrievals:
      • In a discipline : in biology, in computer science, in the history of art, in mathematics, in meteorology, in physics, in theology, etc.
      • With knowledge of the subject at a particular academic level : with an elementary education, with a high school education, with a college education, etc.
      • To what extent the author is an authority on the topic at hand.
      • For a particular class of people : for teens, for seniors, for shut-ins, etc.
      • Is a particular genre or of a particular literary nature: encyclopedias, law, newspapers, poetry, history, bibliography, research, diaries, statistics, state-of-the-art review, dissertation, first-person account, fiction, etc.
      • When the particular subject took place: 16th century, Age of Enlightenment, Victorian Era, 1939-1945, etc.
      • What can be done with the document: buy, read, solve, calculate, download, play games, chat, sell, gamble, search, listen, watch, etc.
      • How others benefited from using the document, i.e., reviews and ratings.
      • What kind of experience the user gets from the document: scary stories, sad pictures, funny jokes, break-your-heart lyrics, etc.
      • Karen Markey. “The online library catalog: Paradise lost and Paradise regained?” D-Lib magazine, v.13, no. 1/2 (Jan./Feb. 2007). http://www.dlib.org/dlib/january07/markey/01markey.html
  • 54.
      • Keywords lack
        • Contextual info
        • Term control
        • Conceptual groupings
        • Conceptual browsing
      • More than 1/3 of records retrieved by keyword searches would be lost if subject headings were not present
      • Calhoun Bibliography, p. 46
      • Skepticism about controlling topical terms, but broad support for control of names, geographical terms, time periods, and uniform titles or some sort of work identifier
      • Classification the new controlled terminology?
      • Identities vs. authority control
    Controlled terminology still needed
  • 55. FAST: Faceted Application of Subject Terminology, a project of OCLC, ALA, and LC. http://www.oclc.org/research/presentations/oneill/ALA2004FAST.ppt
  • 56. FAST vs. LCSH
  • 57.
    • “ Local OPACs have served a purpose but if I were designing an information discovery system today there would be no local catalog,” he says. “OPACs represent a tremendous duplication of effort.”
    • Gregg Silvis, Assistant Director for Library Computing Systems, University of Delaware Library. Quoted in Tom Storey. “Moving to the Network Level.” Next: the OCLC Newsletter , no. 4, p. 6-11. http://www.oclc.org/nextspace/004/1.htm
  • 58. WorldCat as our catalog?
    • Customization: Collections, customized ranking, branding
    • Interoperability: Local holdings, patron authentication, local circulation, consortial resource sharing
    • Configuration: Institution and group profiles, interoperability testing, implementation
    • Other: Direct consortial borrowing, reference and citation management, group resolution
    • SUMMER 2007
    Doug Loynes. OCLC WorldCat.org Update, Oct. 30, 2006. http://www.oclc.org/memberscouncil/meetings/2007/october/worldcatservices.ppt
  • 59. Other WorldCat developments
    • RLG institutional records/enriching master records
    • Identities
    • Terminologies Service
    • Improved Bibliographic Notification (2007)
    • Marcadia (Backstage Library Works)
    • Reclamation
    • eSerials Holdings service
    • Selection Service …
  • 60. Wesleyan Library 2.0 ?
  • 61. Recommended sources
    • BIBLIOGRAPHY
    • Breeding, Marshall and Tom Peters. Smart Libraries Newsletter . http://www.techsource.ala.org/sln/
    • Calhoun, Karen. The Changing Nature of the catalog and its integration with other discovery tools: final report, March 17, 2006 . Prepared for the Library of Congress. http://www.loc.gov/catdir/calhoun-report-final.pdf
    • Library Technology Reports . http://www.techsource.ala.org/ltr/
    • Library of Congress Working Group on the Future of Bibliographic Control. Public meetings. First meeting “Users and Uses of Bibliographic Data,” Mar. 8, 2007. “Brief meeting summary” by Nancy J. Fallgren http://www.loc.gov/bibliographic-future/meetings/2007_mar08.html . Blog of meeting by Karen Coyle http://kcoyle.blogspot.com
    • Marcum, Deanna B. The future of cataloging . Address to the EBSCO Leadership Seminar, Dec. 16, 2005. http://www.loc.gov/library/reports/CatalogingSpeech.pdf
    • Markey, Karen. “The online library catalog: Paradise lost and Paradise regained?” D-Lib magazine, v.13, no. 1/2 (Jan./Feb. 2007). http://www.dlib.org/dlib/january07/markey/01markey.html
    • Schneider, Karen. “How OPACs suck,” parts 1-3, ALA TechSource blog, Mar. 13, 2006-May 20, 2006. Part 1 with links to parts 2-3: http://www.techsource.ala.org/blog/2006/03/how-opacs-suck-part-1-relevance-rank-or-the-lack-of-it.html
    • University of California Libraries. Bibliographic Services Task Force. 2005. Rethinking how we provide bibliographic services for the University of California . http://libraries.universityofcalifornia.edu/sopag/BSTF/Final.pdf
    • BLOGS
    • ALA TechSource Blog http://www.techsource.ala.org/blog/
    • Catalogablog http://catalogablog.blogspot.com/
    • Disruptive Library Technology Jester http://dltj.org/
    • Lorcan Dempsey’s Weblog http://orweblog.oclc.org/
    • Planet Cataloging an automatically-generated aggregation of blogs related to cataloging and metadata http://planetcataloging.org/