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Information Literacy curriculum
 

Information Literacy curriculum

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“Experience & Information Literacy: Primary-Text Focused Curriculum as a Filter for Information Literacy” aims to create a situated context for building information literacy skills. Through tying ...

“Experience & Information Literacy: Primary-Text Focused Curriculum as a Filter for Information Literacy” aims to create a situated context for building information literacy skills. Through tying the research process to the process of exploring and understanding a primary text (in this case, William Blake’s Songs of Experience) and the creative process, our project instills: analytical thinking, a deeper appreciation of reading and discussion, a comprehension of library resources and skills, and a positive view of the library as social and communal space.

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  • Intro to program: who is our intended audience?
  • This relates to Lave & Wenger’s theories of social learning and situated learning.
  • shared inquiry discussion, librarian as teacher-student, participants as student-teachers. “…peripherality, when it is enabled, suggests an opening, a way of gaining access to sources for understanding through growing involvement” (Lave & Wegner)—librarian and curriculum encouraging this progress.
  • Participants will learn to deconstruct a text through focused discussion and through producing their own creative responses to that text. The creative process will be tied directly to navigating the library and its resources.
  • A theory of legitimate peripheral participation developed by Lave and Wenger (1991) asserts that “even so-called general knowledge only has power in specific circumstances”—with this notion in mind we choose to teach aspects of basic information literacy (e.g., the ability to differentiate between various information sources, accessing resources through a library catalog, using electronic databases, etc.) through the filter of a shared text and curriculum. Through the active, close reading of William Blake’s Songs of Experience, and the creation of their own body of work, participants (it is hoped) will by necessity learn to access, use, and evaluate library print resources like dictionaries, thesauri, monographs, as well as electronic resources such as article and image databases, and those found on the World Wide Web. Curriculum exercises will encourage and facilitate this sort of exploration through the act of close reading (unpacking images, words, etc.) and discussion, group exercises, and weekly journal prompts. A theory of legitimate peripheral participation developed by Lave and Wenger (1991) asserts that “even so-called general knowledge only has power in specific circumstances”—with this notion in mind we choose to teach aspects of basic information literacy (e.g., the ability to differentiate between various information sources, accessing resources through a library catalog, using electronic databases, etc.) through the filter of a shared text and curriculum. Through the active, close reading of William Blake’s Songs of Experience, and the creation of their own body of work, participants (it is hoped) will by necessity learn to access, use, and evaluate library print resources like dictionaries, thesauri, monographs, as well as electronic resources such as article and image databases, and those found on the World Wide Web. Curriculum exercises will encourage and facilitate this sort of exploration through the act of close reading (unpacking images, words, etc.) and discussion, group exercises, and weekly journal prompts.
  • Maybe outline our objectives for the integration of weekly journal prompts?
  • Prompt: Listen to the audio recording of poetry. How is listening to a poem or reading it aloud different from reading it silently. How is it different from reading prose or speaking in conversation? Pay attention to tone, pace, etc. Challenge yourself to write an “answer” poem responding to the plea of “O Earth O Earth return! [...]” in Blake’s “Introduction”—what would “Earth’s Answer” be today? Be prepared to read it to the group.
  • exhibition: two month exhibition will feature zine, photographed contributions (w/ captions from participants stating research process), titles used, screenshots of electronic resources. essentially creating a visual bibliography. 
  • Triangulation. Not sure if we want to make the distinction between informal interviews and observed level of discussion. CAT-immediate feedback and collaborative. Performance and product assessment (floating instructors & exhibited submissions). metacognition- instill analytical and reflective thinking.
  • Cambridge Biographical Dictionary & Oxford Companion to English Literature ; databases: Literature Resource Center (make sure to point out the Biographies limiting tab as a searching technique), Columbia Granger’s World of Poetry (William Blake Archive is also worth mentioning as a free online resource alternative to proprietary databases)

Information Literacy curriculum Information Literacy curriculum Presentation Transcript

  • PRIMARY TEXT-FOCUSED CURRICULUM AS A FILTER FOR LIBRARY RESOURCES & SKILLS Sara Grozanick, Julie Seigel & Elizabeth Lizan LIS 673 Library Use & Instruction 9 December 2009 Pratt Institute
  • “ --JOHN DEWEY ”
  • “--LOUISE ROSENBLATT ”
  • to promote : • analytical thinking • a deeper appreciation of reading and discussion • comprehension of the library’s resources and services • the library as a “third place”
  • participants will : • engage in collection development• identify and navigate multiple material types & formats • integrate information literacy skills into creative production • facilitate peer mentorship through collaborative projects • continued use of the library
  • traditionalinformationliteracyinstruction FILTER, curriculum: information literacy learning tied to the situated context of close reading, discussion, and reader response through participants’ production of creative “texts” internalized information literacy skills, teenagers as empowered library users shaping the collection (zine)
  • • facilitate relationship between participantsand text, readers as producers vs. consumers•present information literacy as an iterativeand creative process
  • •Introductions•Songs of Experience: What is experience? 2 •Close reading & discussion: “The Clod & Pebble” and “Holy Thursday”•Journal Prompt: Create an •Juxtaposition/Contradiction & Imagery autobiographical text. •Close reading & discussion: •Journal Prompt: Create a short “text”•Information Literacy: Researching the “Introduction” & “Earth’s Answer” (poem, drawing, etc.) that uses imagery life and work of William Blake. •Lyricism and Reading Aloud to juxtapose to seemingly contradictory •Information Literacy: find an audio that are linked by common idea or theme. recording of poetry through the library •Information Literacy: Using image catalog databases & repositories, picture files •Journal Prompt: Listen to the audio recording of poetry. Write an “answer” poem .Be prepared to read it to the 1 3 group.
  • •Close reading & discussion: “The 5 •Close reading & discussion: “The 7 •Close reading & discussion: “The Chimney Sweeper” & “Nurses Song” Sick Rose” & “The Fly” Tyger”•Voice and Viewpoint •Metaphor •Rhyme & metre•Information Literacy: primary •Information Literacy: Influenced by •Close reading & discussion: •Mid-point qualitative evaluation “London” documents (newspapers, periodicals) •Journal prompt: Evaluation. Blake—bibliographical research &•Journal Prompt: Based on your creating a bibliography. •Journal prompt: Appropriate a “text” Create a visualization (metaphor) from the bulletin board and re-mix reading of primary sources, create a for the research process and/or your •Journal Prompt: We’ve seen how text from the viewpoint of someone others have created works inspired it. Make sure to credit your peers! living during the period of 1789- experience thus far in the program. by works of Blake. Appropriate an •Information literacy: Citation 1803. Think about challenges and goals. image (visual or literary) from one of manuals, intellectual property & •Information literacy: Evaluating the poems we haven’t read as a appropriation. resources, credibility in the research group, and create your own “text.” process, a democratic discussion. 4 6
  • •Close reading & discussion: “The 9 •Close reading & discussion: “The Human Abstract” Voice of the Ancient Bard”•Revision and creative process: Guest •Sharing reflections with the speaker •Close reading & discussion: “The group/read-around•Journal Prompt: Choose a piece and Human Abstract” challenge yourself to revise it. •Information Literacy: Evaluation of •Journal Prompt: Reflective self- the program/instruction.•Information Literacy: Distribution of evaluation of progress and thoughts •Preparation for exhibition information, Blake’s era vs. today, issues of accessibility, credibility, control. on the program. Thinking about zine’s contribution to the •Peer revision & self-curating (zine) collection & what collection development •Information Literacy: Continued use means. of dictionaries & thesauri. 8 10
  • • converting content into conversations • promoting resource sharing & collaborative production • strengthening partnership between library & community
  • • surveys • interviews•observed level of participation in discussion, research, and production • enrollment, circulation, and transaction statistics
  • Blake, W. (1984). Songs of experience: Facsimile reproduction with 26 plates in full color. New York: Dover. Dewey, J. (1938). Experience & Education. The Kappa Delta Pi lecture series, [no. 10]. New York: Macmillan. Jacobs, H. L. M. (2008). Information Literacy and Reflective Pedagogical Praxis. Journal of Academic Librarianship, 34(3). Kent, R. (1997). Room 109: The promise of a portfolio classroom. Portsmouth, NH: Boynton/Cook-Heinemann. Lave, J. & Wenger, E. (1991). Legitimate Peripheral Participation. In Situated Learning: Legitimate Peripheral Participation. New York: Cambridge UP.Rosenblatt, L. M. (1994). The reader, the text, the poem: The transactionaltheory of the literary work. Carbondale: Southern Illinois University Press.