D-Wave One and Quantum Computing

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D-Wave claims to be selling the world's first commercial quantum computer. But is it really? And why are people so excited about quantum computing in general? (To fully follow along with this presentation, please grab the presentation script from http://granades.com/2011/09/12/talking-science-at-dragoncon-2011/ ‎)

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D-Wave One and Quantum Computing

  1. 1. Image courtesy D-Wave Systems, Inc.<br />
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  12. 12. Photo courtesy pasukara76<br />
  13. 13. D-Wave One<br />The First Commercial Quantum Computer<br />Stephen Granade<br />http://granades.com<br />stephen@granades.com<br />@sargent on Twitter<br />
  14. 14. Computing with Craigs<br />
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  16. 16. 16 8 4 2 1<br />1<br />0<br />0<br />1<br />1<br />16 2 1<br /> + +<br />= 19<br />
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  18. 18. Photo courtesy Oneras<br />
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  21. 21. Vertical light:<br />Horizontal light:<br />A mix:<br />Amplitudes<br />Square for probabilities:<br />
  22. 22. Vertical polarizer:<br />Horizontal polarizer:<br />nada<br />
  23. 23. Vertical polarizer:<br />45 degree polarizer:<br />Horizontal polarizer:<br />
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  26. 26. 3-Bit Number<br />3-Qubit Number<br />Superposition makes<br />this possible<br />
  27. 27. Classical Computer<br />Quantum Computer<br />
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  29. 29. Public<br />Private<br />
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  32. 32. Photo courtesy joshfassbind<br />
  33. 33. If n has the factors p and q,then, if you pick a random x,the above sequence has aperiod that evenly dividesinto (p-1)(q-1)<br />Leonhard Euler<br />
  34. 34. Photo courtesy joshfassbind<br />
  35. 35. Classical factoring<br />Shor’s Algorithm<br />
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  38. 38. Photo courtesy John Fraissinet<br />
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  40. 40. Photo courtesy ghbrett<br />
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  45. 45. Is There a Car in the Picture?<br />Yes!<br />No!<br />Yes!<br />???<br />Photos courtesy borkazoid, Travel Aficionado, and MartinAbbott<br />
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  48. 48. $10 meeeeeeelion<br />
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  50. 50. Try to take over the world!<br />

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