ACRL-NEC 2011: UConn WaterburyLibrary / OLLI Collaboration

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Librarians Embrace Lifelong Learning Initiative

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  • There are few academic outreach initiatives that go beyond offering borrowing privileges: Let’s Talk About It, sponsored by the ALA with a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities from 1983 to 1987. The program invited a “scholar facilitator” to lead book discussions in public libraries. Although this program did not require the participationof academic libraries, although it was adapted in CT by the Southern Connecticut Library Council.
  • Interest in outreach has been in the literature for at least forty-five years. Library Trends devoted an entire issue to library cooperation in January 1958, in an issue called “Building Library Resources through Cooperation,”
  • A survey of current literature indicates that academic libraries determine their interaction with their communities based on three factors:whether a need is expressed from outside the academy whether they see their mission as an invitation to pursue an action on their own accord whether they construct a form of outreach in response to a specific problem or crisisOutreach: Why, How and Who? Academic Libraries and Their Involvement in the Community.Schneider, Tina (2004) 'Outreach', The Reference Librarian, 39: 82, 199 — 213Regional Campuses & Outreach:55. Tina Schneider, “The Regional Campus Library and Service to the Public,”Journal of Academic Librarianship 27, no. 2 (2001): 122.
  • One of the most overused words, Academic Search Premier will yield 1,221 using terms outreach and libraries; when adding academic the numbers go down to 234. There’s much with health sciences libraries and outreach. Adding community brings the results to 57. Now we find one-shot events (Latin History Month event) that serve as PR for the library or as a means to attract new students. Definitions based on the following:Ruth Person, “Community College LRC Cooperative Efforts: A National Study,” Community & Junior College Libraries 3, no. 2 (1985): 55.Outreach: Why, How and Who? Academic Libraries and Their Involvement in the Community.Schneider, Tina (2004) 'Outreach', The Reference Librarian, 39: 82, 199 — 213
  • In 1965, when the ACRL conducted a nationwide survey of 1,110 academic libraries, it found that that ninety-four percent of academic libraries do provide some or all of the above services to most community members (i.e., non-affiliated users), although most impose restrictions.Source: E.J. Josey, ed. “Community Use of Academic Libraries: A Symposium,” College & Research Libraries 28, no. 3 (1967): 184-185. The survey does not ask about endeavors in outreach beyond circulation policies or what types of libraries are more likely to participate in outreach. The ACRL study is the first of its kind, and provides a baseline.
  • There is the concern that that the academic library, by providing too much access to the public, takes away from the support that should be going to the public library, or, in some cases, the school library. Are we taking away from our own students?
  • There are few academic outreach initiatives that go beyond offering borrowing privileges: Let’s Talk About It, sponsored by the ALA with a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities from 1983 to 1987. The program invited a “scholar facilitator” to lead book discussions in public libraries. Although this program did not require the participationof academic libraries, although it was adapted in CT by the Southern Connecticut Library Council.
  • There are few academic outreach initiatives that go beyond offering borrowing privileges: Let’s Talk About It, sponsored by the ALA with a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities from 1983 to 1987. The program invited a “scholar facilitator” to lead book discussions in public libraries. Although this program did not require the participationof academic libraries, although it was adapted in CT by the Southern Connecticut Library Council.
  • There are few academic outreach initiatives that go beyond offering borrowing privileges: Let’s Talk About It, sponsored by the ALA with a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities from 1983 to 1987. The program invited a “scholar facilitator” to lead book discussions in public libraries. Although this program did not require the participationof academic libraries, although it was adapted in CT by the Southern Connecticut Library Council.
  • ACRL-NEC 2011: UConn WaterburyLibrary / OLLI Collaboration

    1. 1. “Librarians Embrace Lifelong Learning Initiative<br />Session 1D<br />Shelley Goldstein, Library Director, University of Connecticut, Waterbury and Brian G. Chapman, Director of Outreach at University of Connecticut, Waterbury and Director of The Osher Lifelong Learning Institute at the University of Connecticut<br />“Librarians Embrace Life Long Learner Initiative”<br />Engaging older adults in new, technology-based learning is at the heart of this outreach project on the campus of the University of Connecticut where there is a dynamic collaboration between the Osher Lifelong Learning Institute (OLLI) and the Waterbury Campus Library.<br />
    2. 2.
    3. 3. What is Lifelong Learning?<br />http://prezi.com/se8xkds-aozs/copy-of-librarians-embrace-lifelong-learner-outreach-initiative-with-ollis/<br />
    4. 4. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UvFtl67uds4<br />
    5. 5. <ul><li>To feel more connected to the campus
    6. 6. To increase the library’s visibility
    7. 7. To explore avenues outside familiar library walls
    8. 8. Because the Academic Plan seeks to embrace “outreach”
    9. 9. Because partnerships are key in our profession
    10. 10. To direct our community members to library-related resources
    11. 11. To share librarian skills/creativity with a captive audience</li></ul>As an urban-based regional campus libraries we have a strong connection to our community.<br />
    12. 12. Outreach<br />“inter-agency cooperation (i.e., with non-library agencies such as museums, governmental units, and social service organizations)” … Outreach which focuses less on circulation policies and shared libraries, and more on independent efforts of academic libraries to move beyond their walls or traditional clientele to interact with their surrounding communities.”<br />
    13. 13. Nov/Dec 2008<br />
    14. 14. http://thewearypilgrim.typepad.com/the_weary_pilgrim/images/2007/04/11/bandwagon1.jpg<br />
    15. 15. If opportunity doesn’t knock, build a door! <br />
    16. 16.
    17. 17. Spring 2009<br />Filled to Capacity!<br />
    18. 18. Expanded Workshop Series<br /><ul><li>free (library) resources on the web
    19. 19. evaluating website skills
    20. 20. RSS feeds & podcasts
    21. 21. Facebook & Twitter
    22. 22. Google (Advanced)
    23. 23. Firefox </li></ul>Fall 2009<br />
    24. 24. <ul><li> map resources on the web
    25. 25. health-related sites</li></ul>expanded again<br />Fall 2010<br />
    26. 26. Co-sponsored event<br />“This Spring Osher Lifelong Learning Institute (OLLI) Roundtable is presented in conjunction with the UConn Library exhibit” <br />Spring 2011<br />http://www.lib.uconn.edu/about/womenshistory/OLLIRoundtable.pdf<br />
    27. 27. Where we are now?<br />
    28. 28. Where we are now?<br />March 18, 2011 –May 6, 2011<br />Cards Issued: 71<br />Historical Charges: 69<br />
    29. 29. What were the challenges?<br />
    30. 30. So what is our collaboration <br />all about?<br /><ul><li> successful “Connect to the World Workshops”
    31. 31. well-attended Exhibit/Roundtable commemorating women’s history month
    32. 32. grateful community members with library privileges
    33. 33. supportive environment for OLLI presenters/members</li></li></ul><li>Plans for the future?<br /><ul><li> how-to use the library workshop for OLLI users
    34. 34. more workshops on technology topics
    35. 35. more workshops on our collections (archival and print)
    36. 36. more exhibits/events to promote visibility of the library
    37. 37. LibGuide for OLLIs
    38. 38. enhanced collection on aging topics (DVDs)</li></li></ul><li>Conclusion<br /><ul><li>The type and extent of an outreach program depends a great deal on the resources available (staffing, time, and funding)
    39. 39. Take it slow, keep your eyes open for opportunities, don’t be afraid to build doors.</li></li></ul><li>Questions?<br />Questions?<br />.<br />
    40. 40. “Thank You!<br />Shelley Goldstein, Library Director, University of Connecticut, Waterbury <br />Shelley.goldstein@uconn.edu<br />Brian G. Chapman, Director of Outreach at University of Connecticut, Waterbury and Director of The Osher Lifelong Learning Institute at the University of Connecticut<br />Brian.chapman@uconn.edu<br />.<br />
    41. 41. FYI<br />.<br />Ruth Pearson, “Community College LRC Cooperative Efforts: A National<br />Study,” Community & Junior College Libraries 3, no. 2 (1985): 55.<br />E.J. Josey, ed. “Community Use of Academic Libraries: A Symposium,” College<br />& Research Libraries 28, no. 3 (1967): 184-185.<br />Tina Schneider, “Outreach”, The Reference Librarian39, no. 82 (2004): 199-213.<br />
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