Frontline Advocacy for Libraries

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  • 1. WHERE
THE
ACTION
IS: Advocating
for
Your
Library
from
the
Frontline A
self-paced
interactive
tutorial 1
  • 2. Welcome! Everyone
who
works
in
a
library
has
 opportunities
to
influence
what
others
think
 image coming about
that
library.
 The
purpose
of
this
online
tutorial
is
to
help
 you
get
fresh
ideas
about
how
you
can
be
 an
effective
advocate
for
your
library,
both
 on
and
off
the
job.
 The
tutorial
is
easy.

Read
at
your
own
 pace,
and
click
on
the
interactive
features
 that
catch
your
eye.
It
should
only
take
 about
20
minutes. 2
  • 3. What
is
frontline
advocacy
for
libraries? The
word
frontline
describes
anyone
who
interacts
 directly
with
others
in
the
course
of
providing
a
product
 or
service.

 Advocacy
means
supporting
a
cause
or
action.

We
 often
think
that
only
lobbyists
or
certain
kinds
of
 administrators
have
the
skills
and
connections
to
be
 advocates.

Not
true!


Some
of
the
most
effective
 advocacy
is
staff-driven,
and
everyone
can
do
it,
 especially
you. So...frontline
advocacy
for
libraries
means
using
your
 position
as
a
library
employee
to
promote
your
library
 and
encourage
the
support
of
others. 3
  • 4. How
does
this
apply
to
me
and
my
library? Positive
interactions
by
frontline
library
staff
bring
 about
customer
loyalty
and
support.

In
other
words,
 when
people
think
about
your
library,
they
probably
 don’t
think
about
your
director
or
management
staff.

 They
think
about
-
and
interact
with
-
you.

 When
they
enjoy
positive
interactions
with
you,
they
 also
form
a
positive
impression
of
your
library.

Your
 help,
friendliness
and
personal
attention
make
them
 more
likely
to
be
a
faithful
library
user
and
potentially
 to
become
a
champion
of
your
library
because
of
its
 association
with
you. 4
  • 5. What’s
a
frontline
advocacy
interaction? Good
question!
It’s
any
interaction
by
you
that
gives
 you
the
opportunity
to
share
information
about
your
 library’s
strengths
and
needs.

 For
example,
let’s
say
your
library
manager
is
asking
 Library Photo for
more
money
for
online
resources
in
next
year’s
 from Ann budget.

 When
a
patron
comments
on
the
database
he
found
 helpful,
or
perhaps
complains
about
waiting
for
a
 computer,
take
the
opportunity
to
tell
him,
“We’re
trying
 add
more
online
resources
in
next
year’s
budget.

In
 fact,
we
have
a
fact
sheet
at
the
reference
desk
that
 will
tell
you
all
about
it.

Let
me
get
one
for
you!”

 5
  • 6. When
your
library’s
evening
hours
are
threatened,
be
 sure
your
evening
users
take
home
the
book
mark
that
 tells
them
who
they
can
contact
to
voice
their
support
 for
keeping
the
library
open
late. It’s
tough
to
measure
the
impact
your
frontline
 advocacy
interactions
make
on
people,
but
articulating
 your
library’s
strengths
and
needs
do
make
a
 tremendous
difference
in
library
support.

 6
  • 7. Who
me? We
all
have
our
comfort
zones
when
it
comes
to
 ? sharing
messages
about
our
libraries
and
the
support
 they
need.

Your
personal
comfort
zone
may
start
with
 talking
to
a
family
member,
friend
or
neighbor.

 Practice
until
you
feel
like
stretching
yourself
a
little
bit,
 then
share
your
library’s
good
points
and
needs
with
 someone
you
know
less
well.

Keep
it
short
and
 simple.

 Your
library
will
benefit
from
what
you
have
to
say
and
 you’ll
benefit
from
the
confidence
that
comes
from
 doing
something
you
thought
you
could
do.


 7
  • 8. Love
me,
love
my
library It’s
easy
to
understand
how
library
staff
who
 interact
directly
with
customers
are
on
the
 frontline.
The
reference
librarian,
circulation
 desk
clerk,
the
person
who
speaks
to
a
book
 group
or
assists
computer
users
are
obvious
 examples.
 But
what
if
your
job
doesn’t
require
you
to
 interact
directly
with
library
users?

 8
  • 9. Don’t
worry!

Whether
or
not
your
duties
 put
you
in
the
public
spotlight,
you
can
be
 a
great
frontline
advocate
for
your
library.
 That’s
because
you
have
friends,
relatives,
 neighbors
and
non-library
colleagues
who
 know
you
work
for
the
library
and
for
whom
 you
are
“the
face”
of
the
library.
 Here
is
a
video
of
how
ALA’s
2009-1010
 President,
Camila
Alire,
explains
it. 9
  • 10. You
are
your
library’s
BEST
advocate And
guess
what
else?
You’re
also
your
 library’s
best
frontline
advocate. You
are
the
person
who
interacts
every
day
 with
library
customers
and
with
others
who
 know
you
work
at
the
library
and
associate
 you
with
the
services
provided
there.
 10
  • 11. Whether
you’ve
worked
at
your
library
for
6
months
or
 25
years,
you
are
an
insider
who
knows
your
library
 best.
Because
of
this,
you
may
even
be
the
“go
to”
 person
for
your
friends
and
colleagues
who
are
 looking
for
information
or
advice. Work
with
your
library
manager
for
ideas
and
 language
to
use
to
point
out
your
library’s
strengths
 and
needs
-
and
to
persuade
others
to
support
it.

 11
  • 12. Libraries
exist
within
communities All
libraries
have
communities
 associated
with
them
–
towns,
schools,
 corporations,
colleges
or
universities
or
 hospitals,
for
example.
Libraries
and
 their
communities
enjoy
a
mutually
 beneficial
relationship.
 The
library
supports
its
community
by
 providing
important
resources
and
 services.
The
community
gives
the
 library
the
reason
for
its
very
existence
 and
devotes
some
of
its
resources
to
 its
support.
 12
  • 13. Whether
your
library’s
community
is
a
 neighborhood,
an
elementary
school,
a
high
 school,
a
university
campus,
or
a
historical
 society,
you
are
a
member
of
this
community
 and
understand
it
best.
 Because
you
understand
your
library
and
its
 community,
you
understand
your
library’s
value
 to
its
community
best. Shout
it
out
like
these
New
Yorkers. 13
  • 14. What
is
your
library’s
value? Why
does
your
library
matter?
Take
 some
time
to
think
about
this
question.

 Each
kind
of
library
offers
its
community
 something
unique
and
vital
to
the
 success
of
that
community.


 If
you
work
in
a
public
library,
is
your
 library
the
hub
of
your
neighborhood?
 Do
you
have
wonderful
job
and
career
 resources?
Are
you
passionate
about
 services
to
children
and
teens?
Are
your
 Internet
computers
always
in
demand? 14
  • 15. If
you
work
in
a
school
library,
what
do
 students
enjoy
most
about
their
library
time?
 Do
you
offer
excellent
help
teaching
how
to
 do
research?
 How
does
your
library
serve
teachers,
 families
and
others? 15
  • 16. What
about
your
college
or
university
library?
 Is
it
the
best
place
on
campus
to
study
or
work
 on
group
projects?
Does
it
offer
a
huge
range
 of
databases?
Does
your
faculty
value
your
 library
staff’s
ability
to
acquire
materials
from
 other
libraries
quickly? Do
you
work
in
a
special
library,
such
as
a
 business,
law
firm
or
hospital?
Does
a
wide
 range
of
employees
use
your
library?
Do
you
 or
other
library
staff
provide
personalized
 research
services?
Do
your
library’s
resources
 help
others
be
more
successful
at
their
jobs? 16
  • 17. Articulating
your
library’s
value Thinking
about
these
kinds
of
questions
will
help
you
understand
the
value
of
your
library,
 and
that’s
essential
before
you
can
articulate
that
value
to
others. Check
out
Harper
College’s

 Tour
The
Library
video 17
  • 18. Libraries
are
good
investments! Businesses
like
to
measure
“return
on
investment”
or
 “ROI,”
the
profit
that
is
realized
from
investing
in
a
 resource.

Libraries
of
all
kinds
provide
a
return
on
their
 investment
too;
and
that
ROI
is
an
important
 determinant
of
your
library’s
value.

Regardless
of
the
 kind
of
library
in
which
you
work,
your
job
is
to
 communicate
its
value
to
others
whenever
you
can.

 How
is
your
library
 valuable?

Please
share
 Its
about
informing
your
customer
and
persuading
that
 at
ALAConnect. person
to
consider
how
your
library
benefits
him
or
her,
 and
to
feel
inspired
to
act
on
your
library’s
behalf.

 Work
with
your
library’s
management
team
to
craft
the
 best
frontline
advocacy
messages.

 18
  • 19. Becoming
an
effective
frontline
advocate
is
easy You’re
probably
thinking,
“Hey,
I
already
do
 this!”
But
how
can
you
do
it
systematically
and
 be
more
effective? Good
news!
ALA
has
easy-to-use
Frontline
 Advocacy
Toolkits,
online
resources
that
can
 help
you
determine
what
you
should
tell
others
 about
your
library
and
how
you
can
become
an
 ace
at
frontline
advocacy.
There
are
toolkits
for
 every
kind
of
library:

public,
school,
academic
 and
special...

 ...and
they’re
just
a
click
away. 19
  • 20. Creating
advocacy
message These
toolkits
can
help
you
and
your
library
management
 team
employ
effective
practices
and
processes
for
creating
 messages
that
convey
your
library’s
value,
articulate
its
 needs
and
persuade
users
that
you
need
action
from
them.

 The
toolkit
will
help
you
identify
key
words
that
come
to
 mind
when
you
think
about
why
your
library
is
valuable.

 Research
help?
Computer
access?
Job
resources?
 Personalized
services?

 Can
you
articulate
your
advocacy
message
in
15
words
or
 less?
Could
you
say
it
in
the
time
it
takes
to
walk
to
your
car
 with
someone
in
the
parking
lot?
Click
here
to
learn
more.
 20
  • 21. Who
needs
to
hear
your
advocacy
message? Potentially
everyone
you
know.

People
 who
use
your
library,
who
know
how
they
 benefit
from
your
library’s
resources,
will
 be
a
very
receptive
audience
for
your
 message.
 They’ll
also
be
motivated
to
share
your
 message
with
others
and
help
your
library
 gain
the
resources
it
needs. 21
  • 22. Some
advocacy
messages
are
best
targeted
to
 specific
audiences.

 For
example,
business
students
can
work
through
 the
student
government
to
support
your
college/ university
library’s
request
for
more
online
business
 reference
tools.

Parents
who
bring
their
children
to
 story
time
at
your
public
library
branch
should
 understand
why
your
library
needs
to
expand
its
 children’s
area.

Corporate
personnel
who
depend
 upon
your
special
library
for
a
competitive
edge
 need
to
become
library
advocates.

In
all
these
 examples,
you
are
the
best
messenger. Click
here
to
read
more
about
identifying
your
key
 audiences. 22
  • 23. Think
about
those
who
don’t
use
your
library,
but
 should.

Who
can
you
persuade
to
try
it?

Start
by
 inviting
just
one
person
-
a
family
member,
friend
 or
colleague
-
to
come
for
a
visit.

 Be
persistent!
And
when
that
person
comes,
be
 sure
to
take
the
time
to
show
how
your
library’s
 resources
benefit
him
or
her.

Remember
that
 Tell
us
with
whom
you
share
 everyone
who
understands
your
library’s
value
is
 your
advocacy
message.
 a
potential
library
champion. 23
  • 24. Seize
the
opportunity! Don’t
let
opportunities
to
be
an
effective
frontline
advocate
for
your
library
pass
you
by.
 And
don’t
wait
for
a
crisis
to
advocate
for
your
library.

Practice
it
every
day,
and
when
 there
is
a
special
issue
or
concern,
you’ll
feel
like
a
pro. Here’s
are
two
examples.... Example 1 Example 2 24
  • 25. Team
up
with
your
library
management
 team
and
other
staff
and
brainstorm
 ways
to
communicate
appropriately
the
 kind
of
support
you
need.

Share
ideas
 to
place
your
library
front
and
center
in
 a
positive
way.

 25
  • 26. Timing
is
everything It’s
true.
Take
advantage
of
that
timing.

For
example:
 • What
if
a
member
of
your
book
club
has
just
announced
she’s
expecting
 her
first
child?

Tell
that
perspective
parent
about
materials
or
 programming
your
library
has
on
prenatal
care.

Let
her
know
that
your
 library
wants
to
add
programs
for
toddlers. • What
about
college
students
who
are
leaving
to
study
abroad?
Let
the
students
 know
what
your
college
library
has
to
offer
to
prepare
them
for
living
in
their
 new
country,
and
be
sure
their
teachers
know
that
your
library
is
the
first
place
 students
go
to
find
that
information. • What
if
your
organization
has
just
taken
a
new
client
or
partner
on
 board?
Gather
some
helpful
information
on
them
and
share
it
with
your
 corporate
colleagues.

Remind
your
colleagues
that
the
resources
your
 organization
subscribes
to
allow
you
to
gather
this
information
quickly.

 26
  • 27. There
are
some
special
times
to
tell
your
 friends,
relatives,
neighbors
and
non-library
 colleagues
what
the
library
has
for
them.

 Go
online
to
www.ilovelibraries.org
or

 www.ala.org
and
find
out
the
dates
for
 National
Library
Week,
Library
Snapshot
 Day,
Read
Across
America
Week,
Teen
 Read
Week,
or
other
celebrations,
and
 make
use
of
the
public
awareness
those
 events
generate.
 27
  • 28. How
do
you
get
people’s
attention? Start
slowly.

For
example: • Send
a
faculty
member
an
email
inviting
her
to
 bring
her
freshman
class
for
a
library
tour. • Call
a
neighbor
and
let
him
know
that
he
can
use
the
library’s
 computers
to
write
a
resume
and
search
for
a
job. 28
  • 29. • Tell
a
parent
you
bump
into
at
the
store
that
your
library
will
 soon
be
open
longer
hours
for
students.
 • Let
a
colleague
in
another
department
know
that
 your
library
has
begun
subscribing
to
a
new
 database
he
might
find
helpful.
 See?

its
easy!

Once
those
individuals
realize
the
benefits
they
derive,
 encourage
them
to
step
up
and
help
your
library
keep
those
resources
-
and
 gain
new
ones.

Click
here
to
learn
more. 29
  • 30. Feeling
more
confident? Work
closely
with
your
library
manager
to
spread
effective
frontline
 advocacy
messages:

 • Write
a
letter
to
the
editor.

Praise
your
library
as
a
community
jewel
 and
a
great
place
to
work
and
explain
why
it
needs
financial
support
 to
remain
strong.

 • Start
a
blog
about
all
the
things
that
make
your
library
“the
resource
 place”
for
everyone.”

Include
in
your
blog
ways
that
others
can
 become
your
library’s
friend
and
advocate.

 • Design
and
print
some
simple,
colorful
fliers
or
bookmarks
that
 remind
readers
of
your
library’s
assets
or
special
services
and
let
 people
know
which
ones
are
threatened
by
budget
cuts. 30
  • 31. What’s
your
kind
of
library? Public?
School?
Academic?
Special?
 ALA’s
four
toolkits
can
be
easily
accessed.
 Simply
click
on
the
Frontline
Advocacy
 Toolkit
for
your
kind
of
library,
and
find
 simple,
ready-to-use
tools
that
will
make
 you
a
frontline
advocacy
ace
in
no
time
flat! • Public
library • School
library • Academic
library • Special
library 31
  • 32. What
have
you
learned? Has
this
tutorial
inspired
you
to
think
creatively
about
how
you
can
be
a
 better
frontline
advocate
for
your
library?
 Take
a
short
quiz
and
see
what
you’ve
learned!
 32
  • 33. Frontline
Advocacy
Quiz
-
Question
1
of
4 1.

Which
of
the
following
are
examples
of
frontline
advocacy
interaction?

 A. Telling
students
and
teachers
that
study
groups
need
for
the
library
to
be
open
in
the
evenings,
and
their
voices
 need
to
be
heard
to
prevent
cuts
in
evening
hours. B. Sending
a
colleague,
family
member
or
friend
an
article
you
know
he
will
find
helpful,
and
reminding
him
that
your
 library
provided
this
information
and
needs
his
ongoing
support. C. Being
sure
that
a
parent
you
know
understands
why
your
library
needs
to
expand
its
space
and
services
for
children. D. Informing
a
book
club
that
meets
at
your
library
that
possible
cuts
to
your
collections
budget
will
impact
your
library’s
 ability
to
have
their
titles
on
hand,
then
giving
them
contact
information
for
the
decision
makers
who
will
be
 determining
the
library’s
budget. E. All
of
the
above. 33
  • 34. Frontline
Advocacy
Quiz
-
Question
1
of
4 1.

Which
of
the
following
are
examples
of
frontline
advocacy
interaction?

 A. Telling
students
and
teachers
that
study
groups
need
for
the
library
to
be
open
in
the
evenings,
and
their
voices
 need
to
be
heard
to
prevent
cuts
in
evening
hours. B. Sending
a
colleague,
family
member
or
friend
an
article
you
know
he
will
find
helpful,
and
reminding
him
that
your
 library
provided
this
information
and
needs
his
ongoing
support. C. Being
sure
that
a
parent
you
know
understands
why
your
library
needs
to
expand
its
space
and
services
for
children. D. Informing
a
book
club
that
meets
at
your
library
that
possible
cuts
to
your
collections
budget
will
impact
your
library’s
 ability
to
have
their
titles
on
hand,
then
giving
them
contact
information
for
the
decision
makers
who
will
be
 determining
the
library’s
budget. E. All
of
the
above. 33
  • 35. Frontline
Advocacy
Quiz
-
Question
2
of
4 2.

The
person
who
is
in
a
good
position
to
be
an
effective
frontline
advocate
for
your
library
is:
 A. The
individual
who
manages
your
library B. The
one
who
handles
reference
and
research
requests C. The
cataloger
or
clerk
who
works
behind
the
scenes
 D. The
staff
member
who
works
at
the
circulation
desk E. All
of
the
above 34
  • 36. Frontline
Advocacy
Quiz
-
Question
2
of
4 2.

The
person
who
is
in
a
good
position
to
be
an
effective
frontline
advocate
for
your
library
is:
 A. The
individual
who
manages
your
library B. The
one
who
handles
reference
and
research
requests C. The
cataloger
or
clerk
who
works
behind
the
scenes
 D. The
staff
member
who
works
at
the
circulation
desk E. All
of
the
above 34
  • 37. Frontline
Advocacy
Quiz
-
Question
3
of
4 3.

What’s
an
effective
way
to
get
your
frontline
advocacy
message
heard? A. Tell
your
advocacy
message
to
everyone
you
can
think
of B. Sending
an
email
blast
with
your
advocacy
message
clearly
spelled
out C. Handing
out
fact
sheets,
fliers
or
bookmarks
that
publicize
your
library’s
advocacy
message D. Inviting
people
to
your
library
to
learn
how
they
benefit
from
its
services
and
resources
and
how
they
can
support
it E. All
of
the
above 35
  • 38. Frontline
Advocacy
Quiz
-
Question
3
of
4 3.

What’s
an
effective
way
to
get
your
frontline
advocacy
message
heard? A. Tell
your
advocacy
message
to
everyone
you
can
think
of B. Sending
an
email
blast
with
your
advocacy
message
clearly
spelled
out C. Handing
out
fact
sheets,
fliers
or
bookmarks
that
publicize
your
library’s
advocacy
message D. Inviting
people
to
your
library
to
learn
how
they
benefit
from
its
services
and
resources
and
how
they
can
support
it E. All
of
the
above 35
  • 39. Frontline
Advocacy
Quiz
-
Question
4
of
4 4.

ALA
provides
easy-to-use
Frontline
Advocacy
toolkits
online
for
staff
in
which
kinds
of
 libraries?:
 A. Public B. School C. Academic
 D. Special E. All
of
the
above 36
  • 40. Frontline
Advocacy
Quiz
-
Question
4
of
4 4.

ALA
provides
easy-to-use
Frontline
Advocacy
toolkits
online
for
staff
in
which
kinds
of
 libraries?:
 A. Public B. School C. Academic
 D. Special E. All
of
the
above 36
  • 41. Thank
you
for
taking
the
time
to
learn
about
 Advocating
for
Your
Library
from
the
Frontline Now go out and be a frontline advocate for your library! 37