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FST 1.1

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  • Transcript

    • 1. Warm-Up: Read page 5 in your textbook
    • 2. Chapter 1: Exploring Data
    • 3. Chapter 1: Exploring Data Section 1.1 Tables and Graphs
    • 4. Essential Question:
    • 5. Essential Question: What do we need to consider when reading a table?
    • 6. Vocabulary
    • 7. Vocabulary Statistics:
    • 8. Vocabulary Statistics: branch of math; collection, organizing, analysis, and interpretation of information
    • 9. Vocabulary Statistics: branch of math; collection, organizing, analysis, and interpretation of information Data:
    • 10. Vocabulary Statistics: branch of math; collection, organizing, analysis, and interpretation of information Data: information that is collected
    • 11. Vocabulary Statistics: branch of math; collection, organizing, analysis, and interpretation of information Data: information that is collected Variable:
    • 12. Vocabulary Statistics: branch of math; collection, organizing, analysis, and interpretation of information Data: information that is collected Variable: a certain characteristic of a person or thing that is being examined
    • 13. Vocabulary Statistics: branch of math; collection, organizing, analysis, and interpretation of information Data: information that is collected Variable: a certain characteristic of a person or thing that is being examined Population:
    • 14. Vocabulary Statistics: branch of math; collection, organizing, analysis, and interpretation of information Data: information that is collected Variable: a certain characteristic of a person or thing that is being examined Population: the set of ALL individuals or objects you want to study
    • 15. Sample:
    • 16. Sample: the part ACTUALLY studied (a subset of the population)
    • 17. Sample: the part ACTUALLY studied (a subset of the population) Survey:
    • 18. Sample: the part ACTUALLY studied (a subset of the population) Survey: gathering facts or opinions through an interview or questionnaire
    • 19. Sample: the part ACTUALLY studied (a subset of the population) Survey: gathering facts or opinions through an interview or questionnaire Census:
    • 20. Sample: the part ACTUALLY studied (a subset of the population) Survey: gathering facts or opinions through an interview or questionnaire Census: survey of the entire population (U.S. Census - every 10 years
    • 21. Sample: the part ACTUALLY studied (a subset of the population) Survey: gathering facts or opinions through an interview or questionnaire Census: survey of the entire population (U.S. Census - every 10 years Random Sampling:
    • 22. Sample: the part ACTUALLY studied (a subset of the population) Survey: gathering facts or opinions through an interview or questionnaire Census: survey of the entire population (U.S. Census - every 10 years Random Sampling: every member of the population has an equal chance of being chosen
    • 23. Example 1
    • 24. Example 1 A physician takes a biopsy of a suspicious growth to check for malignancy. Identify the variable, population, and sample.
    • 25. Example 1 A physician takes a biopsy of a suspicious growth to check for malignancy. Identify the variable, population, and sample. Variable:
    • 26. Example 1 A physician takes a biopsy of a suspicious growth to check for malignancy. Identify the variable, population, and sample. Variable: Population:
    • 27. Example 1 A physician takes a biopsy of a suspicious growth to check for malignancy. Identify the variable, population, and sample. Variable: Population: Sample:
    • 28. Example 1 A physician takes a biopsy of a suspicious growth to check for malignancy. Identify the variable, population, and sample. Variable: (ask: what is being studied?) Population: Sample:
    • 29. Example 1 A physician takes a biopsy of a suspicious growth to check for malignancy. Identify the variable, population, and sample. Variable: (ask: what is being studied?) the condition of the growth Population: Sample:
    • 30. Example 1 A physician takes a biopsy of a suspicious growth to check for malignancy. Identify the variable, population, and sample. Variable: (ask: what is being studied?) the condition of the growth Population: entire suspicious growth Sample:
    • 31. Example 1 A physician takes a biopsy of a suspicious growth to check for malignancy. Identify the variable, population, and sample. Variable: (ask: what is being studied?) the condition of the growth Population: entire suspicious growth Sample: small proportion taken for the biopsy
    • 32. When reading a table... 1. What is being presented? 2. Is the data trustworthy? 3. What conclusions can you draw from the data?
    • 33. When reading a table... 1. What is being presented? Be aware of what you are looking at 2. Is the data trustworthy? 3. What conclusions can you draw from the data?
    • 34. When reading a table... 1. What is being presented? Be aware of what you are looking at 2. Is the data trustworthy? Consider the data source, accuracy of data, and time when data was collected 3. What conclusions can you draw from the data?
    • 35. When reading a table... 1. What is being presented? Be aware of what you are looking at 2. Is the data trustworthy? Consider the data source, accuracy of data, and time when data was collected 3. What conclusions can you draw from the data? Some conclusions can be made right away, others may need to be calculated or found
    • 36. Example 2 Refer to the table on page 7. How many times as likely was a family to have an income of less than $15,000 if the head of the household had some high school, but no diploma rather than graduated from high school?
    • 37. What do we do?
    • 38. What do we do? Some High School
    • 39. What do we do? Some High School Graduated from High School
    • 40. What do we do? Some High School Graduated from High School 28.2% + 14.5% =
    • 41. What do we do? Some High School Graduated from High School 28.2% + 14.5% = 42.7%
    • 42. What do we do? Some High School Graduated from High School 28.2% + 14.5% = 13.6% + 10.2% = 42.7%
    • 43. What do we do? Some High School Graduated from High School 28.2% + 14.5% = 13.6% + 10.2% = 42.7% 23.8%
    • 44. What do we do? Some High School Graduated from High School 28.2% + 14.5% = 13.6% + 10.2% = 42.7% 23.8% Almost TWICE as likely to have an income of less than $15,000 than a household headed by a high school graduate
    • 45. Bar Graphs: Circle Graphs:
    • 46. Bar Graphs: A graph that uses bars to represent the data Circle Graphs:
    • 47. Bar Graphs: A graph that uses bars to represent the data Circle Graphs: A graph that is made out of a circle. Each section is made up of a percentage of the whole
    • 48. Bar Graphs: A graph that uses bars to represent the data Circle Graphs: A graph that is made out of a circle. Each section is made up of a percentage of the whole Circle graph gives a quick visual summary of the data
    • 49. Example 3 Continent Area 1000 mi2 Population Africa 11,700 (mill) 878 Antarctica 5,400 0 Asia 17,400 3,340 Australia 3,300 29 Europe 3,800 714 North America 9,400 292 Central & South America 6,900 481 Source: 1996 World Almanac and Book of Facts
    • 50. 3a. Construct a circle graph of the areas
    • 51. 3a. Construct a circle graph of the areas 3b. If the areas of the continents were measured in km2, would the circle graph for area be different? Why or why not?
    • 52. 3a. Construct a circle graph of the areas 3b. If the areas of the continents were measured in km2, would the circle graph for area be different? Why or why not? No
    • 53. 3a. Construct a circle graph of the areas 3b. If the areas of the continents were measured in km2, would the circle graph for area be different? Why or why not? No It is the same ratio. Here the units do not matter
    • 54. With our technology, circle graphs are usually made on spreadsheets 3c. Construct a circle graph of the populations using Excel
    • 55. With our technology, circle graphs are usually made on spreadsheets 3c. Construct a circle graph of the populations using Excel 3d. How do the circle graphs indicate which continents have more people for their area?
    • 56. With our technology, circle graphs are usually made on spreadsheets 3c. Construct a circle graph of the populations using Excel 3d. How do the circle graphs indicate which continents have more people for their area? Continents with more people for their area have larger sectors on the population graph than the area graph
    • 57. Homework: page 10-11 #1-24

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