Beyond HREF (LAWDI)

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Slides that accompanied my presentation to the "Linked Ancient World Data Institute".

Slides that accompanied my presentation to the "Linked Ancient World Data Institute".

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  • 1. Beyond HREF<a rel="dcterms:creator" href="http://viaf.org/viaf/220831018">Sebastian Heath</a>Slides shown alongside my presentation to the NEH- Funded “Linked Ancient World Data Institute”. Except for the screen captures, quotes and anything else not original, the content here is ©2012 The Author, released under a CC0 license.
  • 2. Finally, we stress that it is not our intent to ask LAWDIparticipants to adhere to a single standard that dictates howeach project and discipline brings its intellectual content intodigital form. We recognize that existing data is heterogeneousand that many digital humanities projects have investedsubstantial time and money in creating resources according totheir own needs. In this environment, any attempt to create asingle unifying standard of data representation will fail and sowe have not adopted that language in this proposal. We are alsosensitive to the principle that overly detailed standards presumethat a discipline knows all that it wants to say about its topic ofstudy. This is certainly not the case for the Ancient World,where the basic terms of analysis continue to change inexciting ways. Of course, recognizing complexity as thestarting point of discussions does not mean that usefulinteroperability cannot be achieved.From the proposal submitted to the @NEH_ODH
  • 3. Linked Data is about using the Web to connect related datathat wasnt previously linked, or using the Web to lower thebarriers to linking data currently linked using othermethods. More specifically, Wikipedia defines Linked Dataas "a term used to describe a recommended best practicefor exposing, sharing, and connecting pieces of data,information, and knowledge on the Semantic Web usingURIs and RDF."
  • 4. linking data
  • 5. Text Click on the screen capture. Then, hover over “Mozia” in the sentence beginning “See linkeddata...” for an example of turning links to stable entities into a user experience.
  • 6. Nomisma.org is “Under Construction” but does show further examples of using the Internet to gather a distributed definition of a concept such as a hoard ofGreek coins. But again, stability of web addresses is key.
  • 7. Linked Data is about using the Web to connect related datathat wasnt previously linked, or using the Web to lower thebarriers to linking data currently linked using othermethods. More specifically, Wikipedia defines Linked Dataas "a term used to describe a recommended best practicefor exposing, sharing, and connecting pieces of data,information, and knowledge on the Semantic Web usingURIs and RDF."
  • 8. If you go to that page, there’s a link to “RDFa Triples (Turtle)”. We care not just about stable URIs, but alsoabout having automatically parsable content accessible at those stable URIs.
  • 9. “The assertion of an RDF triple says that some relationship, indicated by thepredicate, holds between the things denoted by subject and object of the triple.”<http://www.w3.org/TR/rdf11-concepts/> Predicate Object Subject nm:rrc-525.4a nm:denomination “Denarius” NOTE:You *REALLY* want URIs in all three positions if good ones exist. nm:rrc-525.4a nm:denomination nm:denarius “nm:” = “http://nomisma.org/id/”
  • 10. “Now many people will tell you (indeed Iprobably will too) that you need to distinguishthe statements you make about the thing in thereal world from the statements about thedocument. For example, a URI for me mightreturn a document with some information aboutme, but the creation date for that document andthe creation date for me are two differentthings. And because you donʼt want to getconfused itʼs better to have a URI for the thingand another one for the document makingassertions about the thing. Make sense?”<http://derivadow.com/2010/07/01/linked-things/>
  • 11. Text http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n79033006 is the URI - aka identifier - for the the subject “Augustus”.Go to that link and you’ll see “.html” appended in theaddress bar. That’s an example of redirecting from an abstract identifier to an actual document on the Internet with content about the identified concept.
  • 12. The issue of “identifiers” and “content about what those identifiers identify” falls under the rubric of“HTPP Issue 57” (originally issue 14). Note that it is “OPEN” and there is room for those of us in the Digital Humanities community to speak our minds.Particularly, is the current language around Issue #57 useful for/enabling of what we are trying to do? I suspect many will find that it just isn’t.
  • 13. “Information is always ameasure of the decrease ofuncertainty at a receiver.” http://www.lecb.ncifcrf.gov/~toms/information.is.not.uncertainty.html I quote this as a useful principle that can get a conversation started. I strive to put information on the Internet in such a way that upon transmission, both soft-tissue processors - “Brains” - and silicon/ other agents can make use of it.