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On the Road to Sustainability
On the Road to Sustainability
On the Road to Sustainability
On the Road to Sustainability
On the Road to Sustainability
On the Road to Sustainability
On the Road to Sustainability
On the Road to Sustainability
On the Road to Sustainability
On the Road to Sustainability
On the Road to Sustainability
On the Road to Sustainability
On the Road to Sustainability
On the Road to Sustainability
On the Road to Sustainability
On the Road to Sustainability
On the Road to Sustainability
On the Road to Sustainability
On the Road to Sustainability
On the Road to Sustainability
On the Road to Sustainability
On the Road to Sustainability
On the Road to Sustainability
On the Road to Sustainability
On the Road to Sustainability
On the Road to Sustainability
On the Road to Sustainability
On the Road to Sustainability
On the Road to Sustainability
On the Road to Sustainability
On the Road to Sustainability
On the Road to Sustainability
On the Road to Sustainability
On the Road to Sustainability
On the Road to Sustainability
On the Road to Sustainability
On the Road to Sustainability
On the Road to Sustainability
On the Road to Sustainability
On the Road to Sustainability
On the Road to Sustainability
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On the Road to Sustainability

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Presentation by Ramin Seifi at South Fraser OnTrax's 2nd Annual Sustainability on the Edge Event.

Presentation by Ramin Seifi at South Fraser OnTrax's 2nd Annual Sustainability on the Edge Event.

Published in: Education, Technology, Real Estate
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  • Good MorningI’d like to thank the organizers for inviting me to provide a bit of a glimpse as to what the Township of Langley has been doing on its road to sustainability and more importantly To thank you for braving the weather and attending this one-day conference
  • I have put together a number of slides, mostly pictures, to assist me with what I hope to be telling a story over the next 15 minutes or so;Not knowing the background and extent of knowledge of the audience about the Township of Langley, I decided to start with a few introductory slides about the work of my department at the Township of Langley;Followed with some background and history about the Township; A few words about our context in the region, and finallysome of the initiatives we are currently working on and what our future focus might be…
  • This is a table of our estimated population projections over the next 40 years:As one of the high growth municipalities in the region, we are expecting to accommodate 65% of the overall projected growth of 35,000 people per year within the region, over the next 25 to 30 years.
  • In terms of our historic growth rates, we have seen an annual average growth of about 2.5 – 3.0 % over the past 30 to 40 years
  • I know most municipalities believe that they are unique; butWe are really unique with our active and vibrant mix of urban and rural lifestyles
  • To luxury equestrian themed estate homes
  • As part of the region our developments must comply with the regional plansCurrently LRSP with several key highlights: 1. Protect the Green Zone: (ecologically, agricultural and recreational areas), while establishing a long term growth boundary 2. Build complete communities: complete communities with jobs closer to where people live and accessible by transit, shops and services and a variety of housing types. 3. Achieve a compact metropolitan region: avoids sprawl and dispersal of development by concentrating growth in the centres
  • This is a rapid bus plan [produced by Translink a few years ago, which provides for a future rapid bus corridoralong Fraser Highway to the Langley RTC;Highway No. 1 to theCarvolth area of the Township at the 200 Street Interchange; andNorth to M. Ridge and P. Meadows along the GEB
  • This is a more recent Frequent Transit Concept Plan by Translink, which shows a future rapid transit corridor along 200 St. Between the Langley RTC and Carvolth as well as some of the secondary routes
  • While transportation Planning and Land Use are inextricably connected; for some reason we have two separate bodies in our region responsible for each one of theseThis is the proposed land use plan (received 2 readings by the GVRD Board recently) which contains rather restrict provisions (at least more than its predecessor) relating to land use; but can only make suggestions to TransLink relating to ytransit and transportation infrastructure Goal 1: Create a Compact Urban AreaGoal 2: Support a Sustainable EconomyGoal 3: Protect the Region’s Natural AssetsGoal 4: Development Complete and Resilient CommunitiesGoal 5: Support Sustainable Transportation Choices
  • Just a brief outline of the history of our road to sustainability, which as you can see started many centuries, possibly millennia, ago READ: 2001 to 2010 (David Pollock will provide a bit more detail on the CEEP program)
  • We essentially adopted the commonly known (1987) UN Definition for sustainability – “development which meets the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs” with the vision to build a legacy for future generations by leading and committing the community to a balanced lifestyle.And adopted a charter a couple of years ago
  • Based on the goals and visions of the Charter, which is really a high-level policy document that is hoped to guide us ad we grow, we developed a sustainability model, which you can access on our website and I will try and run you through a quick review; We are using this as an interactive tool:to raise the awareness of sustainability initiatives in the community;to track our progress; andto obtain feedback from the residents.It is a work in progress.
  • A number of years ago Council adopted an amendment to the OCP providing for high density developments in certain areas and along certain corridors
  • Very quickly some slides relating to what we are currently working on:With the GEB…..
  • We are looking at the possibility of Transit Oriented Residential developments….
  • We will continue to tweak and fine-tune some of our specific sustainability measures as we develop more and more neighbourhoods:Some of the measures in the past include ISWM initiatives implementation of which started about 10 years ago in Routley with infiltration measures, that were then expanded upon in Yorkson and enhanced again in NEGE NP
  • In terms of Social aspects of sustainability, we feel that with our aging population, it is critical for our envisioned livable communities to be able to offer the flexibility of residents to age in place;Hence the adaptable housing requirements, recently adopted by Council
  • And finally in terms of environmental initiatives: the solar hot water ready regulations also recently adopted by Council
  • Thank you.
  • Transcript

    • 1. “SUSTAINABILITY ON THE EDGE II” Ramin Seifi, P. Eng. M.C.I.P. Director, Community Development Division Township of Langley, British Columbia November 20, 2010 On the Road to Sustainability
    • 2. Presentation Outline  Introduction  History and Background  Regional Context  Local Initiatives • Policy Framework • Systems and Processes • Neigbourhood Planning • Engineering Servicing  Future Focus
    • 3. Our Mandate: Community Development  Plan, Coordinate and Encourage the Orderly Growth and Development of the Township of Langley
    • 4. Our Vision: Sustainability  Build a Legacy for Future Generations by Leading and Committing the Community to a Lifestyle that is Socially, Culturally, Economically and Environmentally Balanced.
    • 5.  Prepare community plans  Facilitate development applications  Report to Council  Identify and secure development prerequisites, inc. servicing  Draft bylaws, policies and procedures  Create public realm and features  Issue building permits and business licenses  Conduct inspections  Re view plans  Provide heritage services  Economic development  Administer DCCs What We Do… Community Development
    • 6. Birthplace of B.C.
    • 7. Birthplace of Sustainability….  Local Well Water Supply  On-site Waste Management  Ground Infiltration  Amenities Within Walking  Vibrant Downtown Core  Mix of Housing
    • 8. Regional Context
    • 9.  Rich in History and Heritage  Unique identity  Strong Sense of Community FORT LANGLEY SALMON RIVER ALDERGROVE GLOUCESTER BROOKSWOOD WALNUT GROVE WILLOUGHBY MURRAYVILLE FERNRIDGE 272ST 240ST 248ST 256ST 264ST 216ST 224ST 232ST 102 AVE 72 AVE 80 AVE 88 AVE 96 AVE 200ST 208ST 0 AVE 8 AVE 16 AVE 24 AVE 56 AVE 32 AVE 40 AVE 48 AVE 64 AVE Community of Communities
    • 10.  1974: Agricultural Land Reserve  1993: Rural Plan – 1st of its kind in BC  76% of Land Area  Strong Agriculture Base  Ill-Defined Boundary  Small Farms/Country Estates Buffer  107 km of Interface  $250M Farm gate Receipt in 2010 Community of Communities
    • 11. Provincial Regulations Official Community Plan Neighbourhood / Community Plans Development Applications Engineering Servicing Plans Financing Tools Regional Growth Strategies Municipal Bylaws (Servicing, etc.) Planning Framework
    • 12.  OCP Adopted in 1979  Comprised of Several Smaller Community and Neighbourhood Plans  Designates Urban and Industrial Growth Areas  Regional Parks Official Community Plan
    • 13. Community 2006 2021* 2031* 2051* Aldergrove 12,000 18,500 22,000 25,000 Brookswood-Fernridge 13,000 25,000 28,000 48,000 FortLangley 2,000 3,500 4,000 4,500 Murrayville 8,000 9,500 11,000 22,000 WalnutGrove/NWLangley 23,000 25,500 27,000 48,000 Willowbrook/Willoughby 14,000 58,000 62,000 82,000 Rural 22,000 25,000 26,000 27,500 Total 94,000 165,000 180,000 257,000 Population Projection  105,000: 2010 Estimate  Av. 2.5% Growth Estimated  One of 4 High Growth Muni’s.
    • 14. 12,441 14,585 15,767 21,936 36,660 44,617 53,434 66,040 80,179 86,896 93,726 0 20,000 40,000 60,000 80,000 100,000 1956 1961 1966 1971 1976 1981 1986 1991 1996 2001 2006 Historic Growth Rates
    • 15. Rural and Urban Mix
    • 16. Housing Choices
    • 17. Photo courtesy of Homestar Building Corp Housing Choices
    • 18. Housing Choices
    • 19. Housing Choices
    • 20. 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% GVRD Township of Langley Percentageoftotalunits Single Family All other ground oriented dwellings (i.e. townhouses) Apartments 20 Housing Mix – 2006 Census
    • 21. Metro Vancouver Livable Region Strategic Plan
    • 22. 22 Seabus Livable Region Strategic Plan and Transit!
    • 23. Regional Rapid Bus Transit Plan
    • 24. Regional Frequent Transit Plan
    • 25. Regional Transit Network Plan
    • 26. Regional Growth Strategy
    • 27. On the Road to Sustainability  Kwantlen, Katzie and the Stó:lo First Nations  Late 1700’s first European settlers  1827: HBC traders establish homes in Fort Langley  1858: BC is proclaimed as crown colony in Fort Langley  1873: Township of Langley is incorporated as Municipality  1910: BC Electric Railway built through the community  1920: Fraser Highway construction  1964: Trans Canada Highway construction through Langley  2001: FCM Partners for Climate Protection – Corp. GHG reduction  2007: UBMC Climate Action Charter – carbon neutral by 2012  2008: Sustainability Charter adopted  2010: Community Energy and Emissions Plan
    • 28. Sustainability Charter
    • 29. Sustainability Model http://townshipoflangley.visiblestrategies.com/
    • 30. High Density Development
    • 31. Sustainability x Design  Within walking distance (400 m) of key intersections / transit nodes  Adjacent to Highway No. 1 / 200 St. Interchange and Carvolth NP area  Within and Adjacent to the Willowbrook Regional Town Centre  Along 200 Street Corridor connecting Wbk. TC to Carvolth  Adjacent to LEC at 200 St. and 80 Ave.
    • 32. Smart Growth Principles  Support a mix of uses of land  Create diverse housing opportunities  Strengthen agriculture  Utilize smarter, cheaper infrastructure  Develop well-designed compact neighbourhoods  Provide a variety of transportation choices  Encourage growth in existing and established communities  Protect natural environment  Foster unique neighbourhood identity  Engage the community
    • 33.  More density = less land needed to accommodate growth  More Open space  Efficient use of infrastructure  Less sprawl  Makes transit more feasible  Less pressures on agricultural lands  More diverse housing forms and affordability  Creates critical mass for transit and other community services Community Benefits
    • 34. Golden Ears Bridge
    • 35. Transit Exch.; P&R and Residential Proposed Transit Exchange
    • 36. Graphics courtesy of wesgroup Transit Oriented Development
    • 37. Carvolth Plan Update
    • 38. Integration and Harmony  Routley (2000), Yorkson (2001) and NEGE (2006) Neighbourhood Plans  Individual lot infiltration galleries  1’ - 1.5’ topsoil blanket  Greenway swales  Community sand filter and deep well injection  Green streets and vegetated swales Integrated Stormwater Management
    • 39. Age-Friendly Planning  Wider hallways and door openings  Lower switches and counter tops  Stacking of closets  5% of Single Family Homes; and Townhouses  10% of all Apartments Adaptable Housing Standards:
    • 40. Solar Hot Water Ready  Hot water: 2nd largest home energy demand  Average 25% to 30% of home energy use  Single Family homes ready for future solar energy for hot water  Conserve energy and reduce GHGs
    • 41. Thank You On the Road to Sustainability

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