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Dr Colin G. Harrison, IBM Smarter Cities -Seismics and the City 22 March 2012
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Dr Colin G. Harrison, IBM Smarter Cities -Seismics and the City 22 March 2012

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Dr Colin Harrison presented a keynote at Seismics and the City forum - 22 March 2012 in Christchurch.

Dr Colin Harrison presented a keynote at Seismics and the City forum - 22 March 2012 in Christchurch.

Published in: Education, Business, Technology

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  • In 2007, for the first time in history, the majority of the worlds populations lived in cities -3.3 billion. By 2050, city dwellers are expected to make up 70 percent of the Earths total population -6.4 billion Today In New Zealand 80% of your population live in cities
  • Estimated emission of greenhouse gases by cities of the world today – this is a sinficant issue for NZ as we are impacted by GLOBAL greenhouse gases “ as the climate shifted? – NIWA identified in August 1998 that a significant shift in the New Zealand climate has occurred during the past 20 years. The changes have resulted from a strengthening of highs to the north of New Zealand, squeezing stronger westerly winds over southern and central New Zealand. Since 1977: The north and east of the North Island has become 10 percent drier and five percent sunnier, with more droughts. The west and south of the South Island has become 10 percent wetter and five percent cloudier, with more damaging floods. Night temperatures continue to rise. Fewer frosts are occurring nation-wide. The retreat of the west coast glaciers has halted but eastern glaciers continue to shrink. “ LINK: http://www.niwa.co.nz/education-and-training/schools/students/change NOTE have arranged a private tour of NIWA with you on Wednesday with Rob who is head of Science group there (just back from 6 weeks in Antatica) he is a part of my family - so we will have a good time and you can ask him anything/ Investment needed for infrastructure in developing countries by 2030 NZ is vey aware of Asain market impact and oppertunity H2O - Portion of water lost within cities due to infrastructure leaks We are not as concious about this as people are in the USA see article” http://www.stuff.co.nz/waikato-times/news/6351786/American-water-expert-laments-the-waste Cities – more than states, provinces or even nations – will increasingly be the crucible where the success or failure of our planet is determined. USA Vs NZ Language We tend to use region vs provinces NZ has no States I woulld not change it as it is more impactfull – but FYI
  • Do we want to add the benefit in the headings…..
  • Select ‘dollars’ unit.
  • Here are three techniques many of them use to collaborate and build constituency effectively. Recognize Broad-scale Opportunities: A very normal response for leaders faced with complex issues is to simplify them, confining analysis and decision-making to a definable set of well-understood parameters under their control. Increasingly, though, leaders are exploring areas beyond their strict control to seek competitive advantage. In a rail system, for instance, traditional approaches might focus on optimizing the passage of freight over the miles of track within a carrier’s domain and perhaps at fringe points of intersection with other modes of transport. But the most successful rail leaders today recognize they need to take a far broader view of the challenges facing them, even though this introduces greater complexity. They seek insight into all the modes of transport needed to take goods from original source to ultimate destination, seeking to understand the needs of an array of manufacturers, wholesalers, retailers, etc. that ship and receive goods. This enables them to cultivate new business opportunities and also to optimize their overall capacity. Finally, they seek to understand consumer purchasing trends, shipping preferences and views toward issues such as sustainability to better focus their strategic and even operational management. But the more successful leaders we studied realize that the better they are at gathering data to understand such a broadened scope, the better they will be at creating opportunities that put them at the forefront of their industries. To explore, understand and then seize these opportunities, these leaders weave collaborative and information-gathering networks with other forward thinkers and key constituencies. They may tap into existing forums where business, government and citizens convene to discuss issues important to them all. Often, where no such forums exist, they create new ones. Identify and Analyze an Ecosystem of Influence and Decision-making Understanding an ecosystem provides leaders with important insights about how to bridge gaps and find commonalities between groups who have different needs, agendas, values, and approaches. This includes government institutions, non-governmental organizations, commercial interests, and citizens. Many have applied social network analysis in new ways and contexts to do this effectively. By creating a visual map generated partially through automated analysis of existing connections — websites, on-line forums, other digital communications — with an essential overlay of insight gleaned from interviewing players in chief parts of the network, they are able to begin to understand how decisions really get made, what individuals or groups may wield considerable influence in shaping thinking and opinions, what coalitions might easily be built by improving communications channels, etc. Exercising Influence Beyond Traditional Boundaries of Control By definition, leaders seek to influence. But to take advantage of opportunities arising in a smarter planet, many we studied are shifting their focus from ‘commanding and controlling the troops,’ to acting as influential nodes in an opportunity ecosystem, establishing themselves and their organizations as committed, long-term community members and partners. As key influencers in their ecosystems, effective leaders seek to engage with forward thinkers across the ecosystem to understand varying perspectives and motivations for participation or support — or resistance. Effective leasers also help people understand how interconnected systems underpin complex issues, making a strong case for change and improvement. For example, a leader might demonstrate the ways in which improvements in transportation and public health systems also support or extend a city’s public safety initiatives. Similarly, leaders consider the potential consequences of alternative actions across an entire ecosystem, using a variety of data gathering and analysis methods to consider a range of outcomes. They encourage people to adopt meaningful measures for accountability that capture the value of improvements, not only in their particular area of control or primary interest, but also across other affected systems, emphasizing operational, strategic, innovative and societal benefits.
  • Add info re other more recent awards…
  • Group 1 examined the system flows involved in creating a community recycling center and what it means to consider "waste" as a resource. The group disclosed the local wealth and job potential that a community recycling center could generate, they also discussed the positive benefits of energy production, reduced roadside dumping, and the reclamation of a local gravel pit. They explored the larger sustainable implications of what a business like this could mean for their community: a lower carbon footprint, energy independence, emergency preparedness, and a more localized economy.
  • Data Must Be Complete All public data are made available. Data are electronically stored information or recordings, including but not limited to documents, databases, transcripts, and audio/visual recordings. Public data are data that are not subject to valid privacy, security or privilege limitations, as governed by other statutes. Data Must Be Primary Data are published as collected at the source, with the finest possible level of granularity, not in aggregate or modified forms. Data Must Be Timely Data are made available as quickly as necessary to preserve the value of the data. Data Must Be Accessible Data are available to the widest range of users for the widest range of purposes. Data Must Be Machine-processable Data are reasonably structured to allow automated processing of it. Access Must Be Non-Discriminatory Data are available to anyone, with no requirement of registration. Data Formats Must Be Non-Proprietary Data are available in a format over which no entity has exclusive control. Data Must Be License-free Data are not subject to any copyright, patent, trademark or trade secret regulation. Reasonable privacy, security and privilege restrictions may be allowed as governed by other statutes. Finally, compliance must be reviewable. A contact person must be designated to respond to people trying to use the data. A contact person must be designated to respond to complaints about violations of the principles. An administrative or judicial court must have the jurisdiction to review whether the agency has applied these principles appropriately. C ompliance must be reviewable. A contact person must be designated to respond to people trying to use the data. A contact person must be designated to respond to complaints about violations of the principles. An administrative or judicial court must have the jurisdiction to review whether the agency has applied these principles appropriately.
  • Data geeks – analyze it. Care about statistical data. Tech geeks – build something. Care about operational data. Journalists (journo geeks?) – tell a story Community activists – use data for their cause Startups – want to add features (Everyblock) Universities getting involved UIC – Open Gov graduate class with every student doing an open data project UC – Starting an Open Data Lab to compete in the next contest IIT – Student group forming to build apps
  • In 2007, for the first time in history, the majority of the worlds populations lived in cities -3.3 billion. By 2050, city dwellers are expected to make up 70 percent of the Earths total population -6.4 billion Today In New Zealand 80% of your population live in cities
  • Transcript

    • 1. Dr Colin Harrison - IBM Smarter Citiesharrisco@us.ibm.comCreating a Smarter Christchurch © 2009 IBM Corporation
    • 2.  Smarter City Concepts  Contextual Examples  Enabling Change2 © 2009 IBM Corporation IBM Confidential Copyright Colin Harrison 2005
    • 3. We Are a World Of CitiesIn 2007, for the first time in history, the majority of the world’s population~3.3 billion lived in cities. By 2050, city dwellers are expected to make up70 percent of the world’s total population ~6.4 billion New Zealand is one of the most highly urbanised countries in the world, with over 85% of the population living in urban areas.3 © 2009 IBM Corporation
    • 4. Urbanization - an unprecedented force 75% Estimated energy consumption by cities of the world today 80% Estimated emission of greenhouse gases by cities of the world today $41 Investment needed for infrastructure in developing countries by 2030 triillion 20% Portioninfrastructure within cities due to of water lost leaks Cities – more than states, provinces or even nations – will increasingly determine the success or failure of our planet .4 © 2009 IBM Corporation
    • 5. The Principle of “Smart”The Digital and Physical World is Convergingenabling us to leverage information to .develop Insight and Wisdom Digital Worldapplications, workflows, models, Virtually all things, processes and ways of working are becoming analysis, optimization, …. INTELLIGENT data integration Our world is becoming networks INTERCONNECTED sensors / actuators Our world is becoming Physical World INSTRUMENTED buildings, roads, pipelines, grids, airports, …5 © 2009 IBM Corporation
    • 6. The Benefits of “Smart”Intelligent cities enable new approaches to urban infrastructure services... Intelligent Transportation Enhanced Public Safety Systems - Intelligent Surveillance - Integrated Fare - Integrated Emergency Services Management - “Weatherproofing” - Road Usage Charging - Micro-Weather Forecasting - Traffic Information Management - Electric Vehicles Water Management - Smart metering - Network instrumentation Energy Management - Combined Sewage Overflow - Network Monitoring & Stability - Smart Grid – Demand Management - Intelligent Building Management Smart Integrated Building - Automated Meter Management Management - Integrated control systems Environmental Management - Property Performance - City-wide Measurements Management - KPI’s, scorecards - Building to Grid - CO2 Management Copyright Colin IBM Corporation Harrison 20096 © 2009
    • 7.  Smarter City Concepts  Contextual Example  Enabling Change7 © 2009 IBM Corporation IBM Confidential Copyright Colin Harrison 2005
    • 8. Named one of the 10 “Smartest Cities on the Planet” Dubuque was ranked #8 Dubuque the city that came back and the only US city to be recognised Dec 20108 © 2009 IBM Corporation
    • 9. Dubuque - living in a connected city9 © 2009 IBM Corporation
    • 10. Dubuque Optimal Bus Routing Inputs: Bus stop locations Transit demand Resources (buses) Max. trip length allowed Constraints: Travel time Max bus lines allowed Fleet size Load factor Operating costs Number of hops Optimal routes displayed: Red Line: red and brown + Green Line: green benefit Medical Line: orange and yellow Grey Line: dark and light blue Minimizes Unmet Demand Reduces Total Travel Time Lowers Operating Costs10 © 2009 IBM Corporation
    • 11. Dubuque Water Portal – Social Signals Infomation - Notifications - Gaming - Savings Leak detected11 © 2009 IBM Corporation
    • 12. It’s a Journey – building constituencies in the city Focused on Smarter Sustainability by: • Establishing a common vision for sustainability with key stakeholders • Convening a community led Sustainability Task Force to define what sustainability means for Dubuque • Holding Town Meetings to seek further citizen input • Utilizing a 3rd Party Organizations such as Dubuque 2.0, to promote sustainability messages and seek feedback (via community forums, a website and blog, Facebook postings, Twitter, games, and in- town ads) • Tapping into the potential of Public-Private Partnerships, as well as strong elected and appointed local government talent “Successful communities…figure out how to engage …on where you want to take the community…” Roy Buol, Mayor, Dubuque, Iowa12 © 2009 IBM Corporation
    • 13. Dubuque - a Smart City a Loved City…13 © 2009 IBM Corporation
    • 14.  Smarter City Concepts  Contextual Examples  Enabling Change14 © 2009 IBM Corporation IBM Confidential Copyright Colin Harrison 2005
    • 15. Damascus, Oregon Civic Ecology – Waste Recycling Centre15 Copyright SERA Architects Inc. 2011 © 2009 IBM Corporation
    • 16. Open Data Principles – a basis for civic collaboration Data Must Be ACCESSIBLE TIMELY MACHINE-PROCESS ABLE COMPLETE LICENSE-FREE PRIMARY Access Must Be Non-Discriminatory Data Formats Must Be Non-Proprietary Compliance must be reviewable.16 From “Eight Principles of Open Government”© 2009 IBM Corporation from opengovdata.org
    • 17. Open Data - enables the innovative power of the community Hackathons / Hack Salons Groups Photo: John Tolva Photo: Dan O’Neill Award Ceremonies Conferences Photo: MPC17 © 2009 IBM Corporation
    • 18. Closing thoughts…  Money is necessary, but not sufficient  Strong consensus on a narrative is essential  New economies can be created  The Open Data movement multiplies the number of innovators who are engaged  Smart City principles create a forward looking city  …..it’s really about re-building a community18 © 2009 IBM Corporation
    • 19. Thank You For more information search “Smarter Cities IBM”19 © 2009 IBM Corporation