PBS Universal Overview (Nov. 2011)

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  • Give one to get one…within a table
  • Give one to get one…within a table
  • Grounding actviy
  • There are 3 essential components of an RTI model: 1) multi-tiered model (shown above); 2) Problem solving process: identify problem, analyze problem, intervene, and evaluate response (also shown above by circle in middle); and 3) integrated, balanced assessment. This 3 rd component is our focus today. Click – blue arrow comes in then “Data” – Data is used to make decisions about – is our core working for most students? Which students need more support in addition to the core? Which students need more support (frequency and intensity) in addition to Tier 1 and 2. Arrows = movement in tiers is fluid (up, down, around); In a multi-tiered approach to instruction and intervention, teachers provide instruction at each tier of service that is differentiated, culturally responsive, evidence-based and aligned to grade-level, content standards. All students should have universal access to this high-quality instruction. Universal access refers to the right of all students to have equal opportunity and access to high quality, grade-level instruction and behavioral support, regardless of socioeconomic Status, ethnicity, background, or disability (See notes)
  • There are 3 essential components of an RTI model: 1) multi-tiered model (shown above); 2) Problem solving process: identify problem, analyze problem, intervene, and evaluate response (also shown above by circle in middle); and 3) integrated, balanced assessment. This 3 rd component is our focus today. Click – blue arrow comes in then “Data” – Data is used to make decisions about – is our core working for most students? Which students need more support in addition to the core? Which students need more support (frequency and intensity) in addition to Tier 1 and 2. Arrows = movement in tiers is fluid (up, down, around); In a multi-tiered approach to instruction and intervention, teachers provide instruction at each tier of service that is differentiated, culturally responsive, evidence-based and aligned to grade-level, content standards. All students should have universal access to this high-quality instruction. Universal access refers to the right of all students to have equal opportunity and access to high quality, grade-level instruction and behavioral support, regardless of socioeconomic Status, ethnicity, background, or disability (See notes)
  • Pick which slide you like interlocking circles or this one….This one is easier ….
  • Pick which slide you like interlocking circles or this one….This one is easier ….
  • Jessie - Pick which slide you like interlocking circles or this one….This one is easier ….
  • Discuss with neighbor how social/emotional skills– behavioral expectations were taught at your former school.
  • Pick which slide you like interlocking circles or this one….This one is easier ….
  • Teaching a behavior
  • Making it real
  • Pick which slide you like interlocking circles or this one….This one is easier …. - Could have staff think of a time when you were acknowledged at work or in personal life. Share with a partner.
  • Ur fear when we are talking about acknowledgements…. Defining_ An acknowledgement is a recognition of an act or achievement Reward –something given in return for something – compensate. Splitting hair but acknowledgement feel better to me
  • In summary – defining Acknowledgement – recognition of an act or achievement Why they are important- hand out the summary of article When they work / when they don ’t
  • Hand out looking at different types to acknowledgements
  • Pick which slide you like interlocking circles or this one….This one is easier ….
  • There are 3 essential components of an RTI model: 1) multi-tiered model (shown above); 2) Problem solving process: identify problem, analyze problem, intervene, and evaluate response (also shown above by circle in middle); and 3) integrated, balanced assessment. This 3 rd component is our focus today. Click – blue arrow comes in then “Data” – Data is used to make decisions about – is our core working for most students? Which students need more support in addition to the core? Which students need more support (frequency and intensity) in addition to Tier 1 and 2. Arrows = movement in tiers is fluid (up, down, around); In a multi-tiered approach to instruction and intervention, teachers provide instruction at each tier of service that is differentiated, culturally responsive, evidence-based and aligned to grade-level, content standards. All students should have universal access to this high-quality instruction. Universal access refers to the right of all students to have equal opportunity and access to high quality, grade-level instruction and behavioral support, regardless of socioeconomic Status, ethnicity, background, or disability (See notes)
  • As defined by data entered into PBS Surveys

Transcript

  • 1. Positive Behavior Support PBS
    • Madison Metropolitan School District
  • 2. Give One to Get One
    • Name:
    • Role and School: What you hope to learn this morning:
  • 3. Give One to Get One
    • Partner with someone and share information from notecard
    • Exchange cards
    • Find a new partner and introduce the person on the notecard
    • Keep rotating and meeting new people
  • 4. Working Agreements
  • 5. Parking Lot
  • 6. Outcomes
    • Increase understanding of PBS
    • Learn PBS Universal Practices
    • Connect learning to your work
  • 7. Agenda
    • Inclusion activity
    • PBS overview
    • Universal system and practices
    • Secondary & Tertiary overview
  • 8. Foundations for the PBS Model
    • Read silently.
    • Highlight important phrases and/or sentences
    • Share one or two highlights with a partner
  • 9. MMSD GUIDING BELIEFS
    • Read the guiding beliefs
      • What resonates with you?
      • How do see this practiced in your school or district wide?
  • 10. Academic and Learning Systems Positive Behavior Support and Social-Emotional Systems Tier III: Intensive Interventions Students who need Individual Intervention Tier II: Strategic Interventions Students who need more support/challenges in addition to the core curriculum Tier II: Targeted Group Interventions Students who need more support in addition to school-wide positive behavior program Tier I: Core Curriculum and Instruction Tier I: Universal Practices (PBS) and Social-Emotional Learning Standards Response to Instruction and Intervention A Focus on Learning • A Collaborative Culture • A Focus on Results Tier III: Comprehensive/Intensive Interventions Students who need Individualized Interventions/accelerations ASSESSMENT&DATA Culturally Responsive Practices Universally Designed Instruction
  • 11. Social Emotional Learning – Standards and Curriculum SEL
  • 12. Above the Line Restorative Practices Respectful Responsible Safe SEL
  • 13. Positive Behavior Supports
    • Teaching Behavior
    • Data
    • Acknowledgement
    • Behavior Referral
    SEL
  • 14. Responsive Classrooms/Developmental Designs
    • RC/DD
    • Morning Meeting/CPR
      • Teacher Language
      • Logical Consequences
      • Modeling
      • Community Building
      • Student Voice
    SEL
  • 15. PBS Universal System and Practices Positive Behavior Supports Cultural Practices that are Relevant Responsive Classrooms/Dev Designs/Restorative Practices ATL Respectful Responsible Safe SEL
  • 16. 30 Second Speech
  • 17. Text as Expert
    • Read handout
      • Put a “!” by text that resonates with you.
      • Put a “?” by text that you want to know more or have questions about.
    • Share “!” and “?” with a partner.
  • 18. Academic and Learning Systems Positive Behavior Support and Social-Emotional Systems Tier III: Intensive Interventions Students who need Individual Intervention Tier II: Strategic Interventions Students who need more support/challenges in addition to the core curriculum Tier II: Targeted Group Interventions Students who need more support in addition to school-wide positive behavior program Tier I: Core Curriculum and Instruction Tier I: Universal Practices (PBS) and Social-Emotional Learning Standards Response to Instruction and Intervention A Focus on Learning • A Collaborative Culture • A Focus on Results Tier III: Comprehensive/Intensive Interventions Students who need Individualized Interventions/accelerations ASSESSMENT&DATA Culturally Responsive Practices Universally Designed Instruction
  • 19. What Will We SEE? Universal PBS
    • >80% of students can tell you what is expected of them & give behavioral example because they have been taught, actively supervised, practiced, & acknowledged.
    • Positive adult-to-student interactions exceed negative 4:1 goal
    • Data- & team-based action planning & implementation are operating.
    • Administrators are active participants.
    • Full continuum of behavior support is available to all students
  • 20.  
  • 21.  
  • 22. Tier 3 (6+ ODR) 1-5% Tier 2 (2-5 ODR) 5-10% Tier 1 (1 ODR) 80-90% PBS Triangle 399 Students 2007-08 1 st semester 19% 13% 68%
  • 23. Tier 3 (6+ ODR) 1-5% Tier 2 (2-5 ODR) 5-10% Tier 1 (1 ODR) 80-90% PBS Triangle 409 Students 1 st Semester 08-09 4% 11% 85%
  • 24. Infinite Campus (IC) demo
  • 25.  
  • 26.  
  • 27. La Follette PRIDE Creating a common language
  • 28. Black Hawk Behavior Matrix Expectations Hallway Cafeteria Playground Arrival/ Dismissal Areas Assemblies/ Field Trips Restrooms Emergencies /Drills Respect Everyone
    • Hands & feet to self
    • Walk on right side
    • Keep lockers clean
    • Accept responsibility
    • Use trash receptacles
    • Lock your locker
    • Wait your turn
    • Accept responsibility
    • Keep area clean
    • Say please and thank you
    • Play safely
    • Stop your activity at the whistle
    • Use appropriate language
    • Listen to adults
    • Keep hands & feet to self
    • Follow adult ’s directions
    • Enter/leave calmly
    • Listen to speaker
    • Applaud appropriately
    • Keep hands and feet to self
    • Participate appropriately
    • Respect others privacy
    • Flush
    • Wash your hands
    • Listen and follow adult directions
    • Remain quiet
    Respect Education
    • Use a quiet voice
    • Be on time to class
    • Have your planner visible
    • Make healthy food choices
    • Bring your coat
    • Bring a pass if you are leaving the lunch room
    • Eat something
    • Keep hands & feet to self
    • Use a quiet voice in hallways
    • Remove hats/bandanas
    • Turn off electronics
    • Put electronics in your backpack/ locker and keep them there during the school day
    • Return permission slips by due date
    • Represent Black Hawk with pride
    • Use a quiet voice
    • Have your planner or a pass
    • Be aware of other classes taking place
    • Walk
    • Move safely when told
    • Remain with your class
    Respect the Environment
    • Keep your lockers clean
    • Use trash receptacles
    • Keep food in cafeteria
    • Clean up after yourself
    • Keep the area clean
    • Dress for the weather
    • Clean your area before you leave
    • Walk
    • Use trash receptacles
    • Walk on the bleachers
    • Stay seated on the bus
    • Leave the place clean
    • Bring only needed materials
    • Keep the restroom clean
    • Use equipment appropriately
    • Keep the area clean
  • 29. WEST HOUSE Characteristics of Success Video Link : https://mediaprodweb.madison.k12.wi.us/node/551
  • 30.  
  • 31.
    • “ If a child doesn’t know how to read, we teach.”
    • “ If a child doesn’t know how to swim, we teach.”
    • “ If a child doesn’t know how to multiply, we teach.”
    • “ If a child doesn’t know how to drive, we teach.”
    • “ If a child doesn’t know how to behave, we… …teach? …punish?” (Tom Herner, NASDE President 1998)
  • 32. Teaching Behavioral Expectations
    • 1) State behavioral expectations (3-5 expectations)
    • 2) Specify student behaviors (skill on matrix)
    • 3) Discuss why it is important
    • 4) Model appropriate student behaviors
    • 5) Students practice appropriate behaviors
    • 6) Reinforce/acknowledge appropriate behaviors
    • 7) Re-teach as appropriate
  • 33. Voice Volume Cool Tool
  • 34. From High School Lancer Lesson – Personal Responsibility Being On Time Providing Context – Personal Responsibility of Being Punctual Start discussion with following questions (optional: white board) What is the best movie you have seen in theaters lately? What are some of the benefits of being on time to the movie (below are possible answers)? You get a great seat Your group/friends sit together Time to get snacks and popcorn Don ’t have to trip over people Get to see previews Personal Responsibility for Being Punctual/Both School and Non-School Settings . Read questions aloud and have students write down answer then share in circle format or class discussion.
  • 35. Instructional Purpose Everyone has different comfort levels with how they want to interact with their friends. This lesson will accomplish the following: ● Discuss how actions can be unacceptable or ‘cross the line’ ● Share the qualities you look for in a friend ● Practice how to be clear about what crosses the line ● Learn the dangers and effects of cyberbullying What do we want the students to be able to do? ● Identify qualities of a good friend ● Identify what crosses the line for each of us ● Have language they will use when someone crosses their line ● Have language they will use when they see/hear someone else cross the line ● Understand personal responsibilities when online Content standard being taught in this activity: Social Competence: Build & maintain positive relationships through effective communication, cooperation and conflict resolution (MMSD SELS) High School Example SEL Teaching Tool Video Link: http://www.athinline.org/videos/61-library
  • 36. Partner Practice
    • Choose an appropriate behavior.
    • Use the Cool Tool/Teaching Tool Template.
    • Teach and Model with a partner
  • 37.  
  • 38.  
  • 39. Reinforcement/ Acknowledgement is ineffective if…
    • Delivered ambiguously
    • Is not meaningful
    • Creates psychological pressure
    • Never fade ( generalize)
  • 40. Four Corners Activity
  • 41. Dialogue
    • What is currently in place?
      • For students
      • For staff
    • What can more can we build to acknowledge?
      • Students
      • Staff
  • 42. Types of acknowledgement
    • Verbal
    • Symbolic
    • Tokens
    • Tangibles
  • 43.  
  • 44. SCHOOL EXAMPLE
    • Teacher Managed Behavior
      • Disruptions
      • i.e. noisy, out of turn, out of seat
      • Inappropriate language ( swearing, inappropriate conversations
      • Sleeping
      • Tardies
      • Food in class
      • No supplies
      • Lack of participations
      • Cheating (1 st offense)
      • Talking at inappropriate times
      • Dress code
    • Office Managed Behavior
      • Chronic/severe behaviors (classroom managed AFTER teacher interventions)
      • Safety issues (threatening)
      • Serious threats (to students or staff)
      • Violent behavior (fighting, physical aggression)
      • Harassment (bullying)
      • Profanity and verbal abuse directed towards adults
      • AOD
      • Weapons
      • Theft
  • 45. Key Questions
    • How does a staff member make an office referral?
    • Who responds to the call?
    • How is data recorded?
    • What does the intervention look like?
    • How is information communicated back to referring staff members?
    • What does re-entry look like?
  • 46. Academic and Learning Systems Positive Behavior Support and Social-Emotional Systems Tier III: Intensive Interventions Students who need Individual Intervention Tier II: Strategic Interventions Students who need more support/challenges in addition to the core curriculum Tier II: Targeted Group Interventions Students who need more support in addition to school-wide positive behavior program Tier I: Core Curriculum and Instruction Tier I: Universal Practices (PBS) and Social-Emotional Learning Standards Response to Instruction and Intervention A Focus on Learning • A Collaborative Culture • A Focus on Results Tier III: Comprehensive/Intensive Interventions Students who need Individualized Interventions/accelerations ASSESSMENT&DATA Culturally Responsive Practices Universally Designed Instruction
  • 47.  
  • 48. Where are we as a state?
  • 49. Closing Activity
    • How does this fit with your current role?
    • How can you integrate this with other initiatives?
    • Where do you go from here?