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501ferdon techplantranscript
501ferdon techplantranscript
501ferdon techplantranscript
501ferdon techplantranscript
501ferdon techplantranscript
501ferdon techplantranscript
501ferdon techplantranscript
501ferdon techplantranscript
501ferdon techplantranscript
501ferdon techplantranscript
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Transcript

  • 1. EDTECH
501‐4172
(SU09)
Susan
Ferdon


Technology
Use
Plan
Presentation
Transcript
and
Links


NOTE:
Text
in
italics
is
audio
only,
plain
text
appears
on
the
slides.


SLIDE
1:
Technology
Integration
Plan
Technology
Plan
presentation,
by
Susan
Ferdon,
a
student
in
the
MET
program
at
Boise
State
University




SLIDE
2:
Technology
Integration
Plan
“To
realize
the
benefits
of
technology,
schools
must
develop
a
plan
for
integrating
technology
into
the
curriculum.
An
effective
technology
plan
is
based
on
the
shared
vision
of
educators,
parents,
community
members,
and
business
leaders
who
have
technological
expertise.
It
ensures
that
technology
strengthens
existing
curricula
and
supports
meaningful,
engaged
learning
for
all
students.
It
also
specifies
how
the
technology
will
be
paid
for
and
how
its
use
will
be
supported.”

The
preceding
quote
was
included
in
an
article
published
by
the
North
Central
Regional
Technology
in
Education
Consortium,
leaders
in
the
field
of
educational
technology
in
Illinois
until
2005.
http://www.ncrel.org/sdrs/areas/issues/methods/technlgy/te300.htm

While
those
reasons
are
excellent
reasons
to
develop
a
tech
plan,
the
most
prevalent
reasons,
at
least
in
my
home
state
of
Illinois,
are
mandates
by
the
Illinois
State
Board
of
Education.
Illinois
K­12
districts,
in
order
to
qualify
for
e­Rate
funding
and
to
comply
with
NCLB,
must
have
three­year
Technology
Integration
Plans
approved
by
the
state.
While
this
is
certainly
not
the
best
reason,
the
mandates,
Technology
Integration
Plan
template,
and
accompanying
planning
materials
provide
a
uniform
foundation
on
which
Illinois
K­12
school
districts
can
build
their
technology
plans.


For
the
purposes
of
this
presentation,
the
terminology
“Technology
Integration
Plan”
will
be
used,
rather
than
other
commonly
used
titles:
Technology
Plan
or
Technology
Use
Plan.
As
an
Illinois
educator,
I
will
use
the
terminology
that
is
most
consistent
with
my
current
teaching
position.


SLIDE
3:
Technology
Integration
Plan

  • 2. Mandates
aside,
the
development
of
a
comprehensive
and
well
thought­out
technology
plan
provides
direct
benefits
to
school
districts.
While
educators
may
look
at
the
Technology
Integration
Plan
from
an
educational
perspective,
administrators,
taxpayers
and
school
boards
look
closely
at
the
financial
implications.

Fiscal
Responsibility:
 • Technology
Integration
Plans
require
the
inclusion
of
specific
budget
information.
 Districts
are
expected
to
disclose
how
much
will
be
spent
on
what
and
where
that
 money
will
come
from.
 • Careful
planning
will
avoid
waste.
Purchasing
hardware
or
software
that
does
not
fit
 district
needs
can
be
a
very
expensive
mistake.
 • The
flipside
of
that
is
that
Monies
budgeted
for
technology
will
be
put
to
the
best
 possible
use.
 • A
well
thought­out
technology
plan
will
make
the
Best
use
of
equipment
and
 personnel
that
is
currently
available.


SLIDE
4:
Technology
Integration
Plan
Without
funding
there
will
be
no
technology
to
integrate
which
makes
the
fiscal
side
of
a
TIP
critically
important.
How
that
technology
is
used
in
classrooms,
however,
will
determine
how
positively
technology
use
will
impact
instruction
and
learning.

Educational
Responsibility:
 • The
TIP
provides
the
structure
for
developing
clear
goals
and
long‐term
direction
 for
school
districts.
Multi­year
planning
will
allow
time
for
long­term
goals
to
be
met
 but
will
not
be
so
restrictive
that
emerging
technologies
can’t
be
incorporated.
 • As
mentioned
earlier,
technology
strengthens
existing
curricula.
Understanding
how
 and
when
technology
use
can
improve
student
learning
will
make
all
instruction
more
 effective.
 • The
TIP
will
connect
accepted
standards
with
the
work
that
goes
on
in
classrooms
 each
day
allowing
all
involved
to
better
see
how
their
piece
of
the
puzzle
fits
into
the
 bigger
picture.
 • As
the
TIP
is
developed
a
unified
vision
will
(hopefully)
form
which
will
result
in
 strong
support
from
stakeholders.

 
 “A
technology
plan
must
do
more
than
define
the
hardware
you
need.
It
must
 communicate
a
vision
that
is
aimed
toward
improving
learning.”
(Technology
Planning:
 the
Good,
the
Bad
and
the
Ugly,
By
Peter
H.R.
Sibley
and
Dr.
Chip
Kimball,
Ed.D.)



SLIDE
5:
TIP
–
Process
and
Planning
Experts
agree
that
development
of
a
TIP
should
take
place
over
the
course
of
approximately
one
year
and
involve
all
stakeholders.
The
document,
Basic
Technology
Plan
Guide,
published
by
the
Illinois
State
Board
of
Education
Division
of
Curriculum
and
Instruction
states:


  • 3. 
“The
writing
of
a
Technology
Integration
Plan
requires
collaboration
among
district
administrators,
curriculum
leaders,
teachers,
technology
maintenance
and
support
staff,
parents,
adult
literacy
providers
and
community
stakeholders.
Discussion
should
begin
early
in
the
planning
year
before
the
actual
writing
begins.”

The
process
for
development
of
the
TIP
begins
by
assembling
the
Planning
Team
and
establishing
time
frames
and
target
dates.
Dividing
duties
among
team
members
will
help
speed
the
process
and
assure
that
all
stakeholders
take
an
active
role.


SLIDE
6:
TIP
–
Process
and
Planning
The
Technology
Maturity
Model
(TMM)
suggests
that
the
planning
process
be
divided
into
three
phases:
assessment,
formulation
and
implementation.

(Technology
Planning:
the
Good,
the
Bad
and
the
Ugly,
By
Peter
H.R.
Sibley
and
Dr.
Chip
Kimball,
Ed.D.)

Of
primary
importance
in
the
assessment
phase
is
administration
of
needs
assessments.
In
order
for
the
TIP
to
best
meet
the
needs
of
students,
teachers
and
the
community,
information
must
be
gathered.
Previous
technology
plans,
if
there
are
any,
should
be
reviewed.
In
Illinois,
TIP
must
meet
specific
requirements
in
order
for
district
to
be
eligible
for
e­Rate
and
other
funding.
All
assessment
tools
and
dates
must
be
included.
Also,
Goals
and
Strategies
must
be
directly
tied
to
district
School
Improvement
Plans,
ISAT
data
and
local
assessment
data.
Budget
information
must
be
gathered
as
well,
to
meet
the
state’s
documentation
requirements.


SLIDE
7:
TIP
–
Process
and
Planning
The
second
phase
suggested
by
Sibley
and
Kimball
is
formulation.
Now
that
all
information
and
data
has
been
gathered,
it’s
time
to
put
it
to
use.
Component
parts
of
the
TIP
must
be
drafted,
evaluated,
and
finalized.
Throughout
this
process,
all
Planning
Team
members
should
be
active
contributors
and
draft
copies
should
be
made
available
for
stakeholders
to
provide
feedback.
In
Illinois,
TIP
must
include:
District
information,
a
description
of
data
used
to
develop
the
action
plan,
a
summary
and
analysis
of
the
data.
Inventory
and
technical
data
related
to
hardware
and
software
is
required
for
e­Rate
purposes.


The
heart
of
the
TIP
are
the
Action
Plans
that
are
developed.
For
each
goal
identified,
strategies
are
identified
as
they
relate
to
Curriculum
and
Instruction,
Professional
Development,
Parental/Community
Involvement
and
Technology
Deployment.
Budget
and
funding
sources
must
be
explicitly
listed
and
25%
of
the
tech
budget
must
be
devoted
to
Professional
Development.


Though
Illinois
TIP
are
not
required
to
include
any
correlation
to
technology
standards
(ISTE,
NETS,
Illinois
Technology
Standards
http://web54.sd54.k12.il.us/district54/lts/dmoore/techstandards/illtech.htm)
a
comprehensive
tech
plan
will
use
professional
standards
as
a
guide
throughout
the

  • 4. formulation
phase
of
the
process
and
will
correlate
strategy
and
activity
portions
of
the
Action
Plans
to
those
standards.

Template:
http://www.isbe.state.il.us/curriculum/elearning/pdf/basic_technology_plan_guide.pdf




SLIDE
8:
TIP
–
Process
and
Planning
The
third
and
final
phase
in
this
process
is
implementation.
A
tech
plan
that
looks
good
on
paper
will
not
bring
about
change
unless
it
is
implemented
effectively.
Though
not
explicitly
stated
by
Sibley
and
Kimball,
evaluation
is
a
critical
component
of
implementation.
Illinois
TIPs
allow
for
what
they
call
“mid­course
corrections.”
Once
approved,
as
situations
change
tech
plans
can
be
modified.
Evaluating
the
plan
itself,
as
well
as
evaluating
how
well
the
plan
is
being
implemented
are
essential.
Some
experts
suggest
that
the
planning
team
re­evaluate
their
tech
plan
on
a
yearly
basis.



SLIDE
9:
My
Tech
Plan
­
Vision
In
creating
a
TIP,
one
of
the
first
steps
is
to
state
the
district’s
vision.
The
Illinois
TIP
template
suggests
the
following:



“State
the
district’s
vision
and
then
explain
how
telecommunications,
instructional
technology
and
informational
technology
in
instructional
and
administrative
programs
support
the
vision.
Incorporate
a
forward‐thinking
process
which
will
identify
needs
that
may
emerge
during
or
even
beyond
the
life
of
the
technology
plan.
It
should
demonstrate
that
the
district
has
planned
for
actions
such
as
change
in
funding,
student
population
growth
and
building
construction,
expansion,
etc.,
which
may
occur
beyond
the
life
of
the
plan.


A
technology
plan’s
vision
may
be
a
separate
district
vision
for
technology,
or
a
restatement
of
the
district’s
strategic
vision
with
an
explanation
of
how
the
technology
plan
supports
the
vision.”


SLIDE
10:
My
Tech
Plan
­
Vision
The
task
for
this
project
is
to
plan
the
creation
of
a
Technology
Integration
Plan
for
Kipling
Elementary
School
in
Deerfield,
Illinois.
As
suggested,
a
good
first
step
is
to
gather
tech
plans
from
previous
years
for
reference.
For
District
109,
two
tech
plans
are
available
for
review.
At
the
time
of
this
writing,
the
earlier
tech
was
linked
on
the
district
website.
The
current
plan
is
not
available
online
but
I
have
a
pdf
version
of
the
document.

2008
Vision
Statement
“The
Vision
of
Deerfield
Public
Schools
109
is
to
provide
opportunities
for
each
child
to
develop
his
or
her
maximum
potential.
This
purpose
will
be
directed
by
a
commitment
to

  • 5. constant
improvement,
persistent
innovation,
and
continued
growth.


In
order
to
accomplish
this,
the
District
will
integrate
instructional
technology
and
administrative
programs
consisting
of
telecommunications
and
informational
technology.
Since
the
District
successfully
passed
an
operating
rate
referendum
two
years
ago,
the
District
has
the
necessary
resources
to
address
changes
in
enrollment,
student
curriculum,
technology
use
and
infrastructure,
as
well
as
facility
needs
necessary
to
implement
this
vision.”

The
2008
vision
statement
bears
no
resemblance
(thankfully)
to
the
2005
vision
statement
and
there
are
no
other
district
vision
statements
available.
Given
the
criteria
required
by
the
state,
the
2008
statement
would
provide
an
excellent
starting
point.
The
next
steps
would
be
to
locate
the
district’s
vision
statement
and
incorporate
ideas
and
feedback
from
the
Planning
Team.



SLIDE
11:
My
Tech
Plan
–
Needs
Assessment
Following
district
information
and
the
vision
statement,
the
next
component
in
an
Illinois
Technology
Integration
Plan
is
data
analysis.
Illinois
plans
are
required
to
be
research­based
and
that
research
must
include
data
from
the
Illinois
School
Report
Card,
which
state
testing
results
and
demographics,
and
may
also
include
local
assessments.

 • Strengths:
Strong
research
component
and
data‐driven
decisions

In
prior
years,
only
state
testing
data
was
used
in
the
development
of
Action
Plan
Goals,
Strategies
and
Activities.
The
make­up
of
this
affluent
district
is
such
that
95%
of
students
met
or
exceeded
expectations
on
statewide
testing.
The
only
sub­group
that
had
a
statistically
significant
gap
was
special
education
students.
As
a
result,
special
education
students
and
teachers
are
the
only
populations
that
are
addressed
in
the
most
recent
Deerfield
TIP
.For
this
plan,
I
propose
that
additional
data
be
collected,
via
surveys
to
faculty/staff
and
students,
to
allow
for
the
development
of
comprehensive
Action
Plans
which
will
meet
more
wide­ranging
needs.




SLIDE
12:
My
Tech
Plan
–
Needs
Assessment
Metiri
Group
research
(Technology
in
Schools:
What
the
Research
Says,
http://www.cisco.com/web/strategy/docs/education/TechnologyinSchoolsReport.pdf)
shows
that
“in
schools
with
sufficient
access
(e.g.,
1:1
environments,
schools
with
laptops
on
carts,
schools
with
low
student­to­computer
ratios),
the
barriers
to
effective
[technology]
use
are
lack
of:
vision,
access
to
research,
leadership,
teacher
proficiency
in
integrating
technology
in
learning,
professional
development,
school
culture,
and/or
resources.”


Deerfield
qualifies
as
a
school
with
“sufficient
access”
so
I
chose
to
focus
this
needs
assessment
on
two
areas
with
the
direct
and
measureable
connections
to
teacher
and
student
technology
use:
1)
teacher
(and
student)
proficiency
in
integrating
technology,
and
2)
professional
development.


  • 6. 
In
addition
to
information
regarding
technology
integration
and
professional
development,
a
limited
amount
of
demographic
data
was
gathered.
Students
are
asked
to
indicate
whether
they
are
in
4th
or
5th
grade
and
teachers
provide
information
about
their
teaching
assignment.
Information
regarding
equipment
and
Internet
access
is
addressed
in
great
detail
in
the
2008­2011
TIP,
so
that
data
did
not
need
to
be
gathered.



SLIDE
13:
My
Tech
Plan
–
Survey
Questions
Survey
questions
related
to
school
and
home
use
of
technology
by
faculty/staff
and
students
are
included
on
the
survey.
For
students,
technology
use
at
school
is
not
within
their
control
since
use
is
most
often
determined
by
tasks
teachers
have
assigned.
For
adults,
technology
use
at
school
is
impacted
by
the
availability
of
resources
and
the
nature
of
their
job
duties.
Including
questions
about
home
use
will
provide
a
clearer
picture
of
technology
use,
than
would
be
possible
with
school­related
data
only.
For
faculty/staff
and
students,
survey
questions
about
to
school­related
technology
use
are
required;
those
relating
to
personal
technology
use
at
home
are
optional.

Questions
about
the
quantity
of
time
spent
using
computers
and
the
Internet
will
not
provide
data
about
the
quality
and
nature
of
work
students
complete,
but
do
provide
a
starting
point.
Survey
data
will
aid
in
the
identification
of
gaps
between
what
technologies
are
currently
being
used
and
district
goals
for
future
technology
use.
The
next
step
would
be
to
determine
how
effectively
that
technology
is
being
used,
which
would
not
be
accurately
measured
using
a
self­reporting
instrument
alone.

Faculty/Staff
Survey:
https://spreadsheets.google.com/viewform?formkey=dF9IUUhLd3dBVHBnRzI0MnR3WE1iclE6MA..

Student
Survey:
https://spreadsheets.google.com/viewform?formkey=dFRhSUJ3YUlRMlJRYUJ0S3pWSFJWekE6MA..




SLIDE
14:
My
Tech
Plan
–
Survey
Questions
Professional
Development
Historically,
professional
development
for
technology
has
been
limited.
District­level
offerings
are
most
often
40
minutes
sessions
during
a
half­day
Inservice.
Teachers
choose
which
session
to
attend
and
typically
only
one
or
two
sessions
related
to
technology.
At
most,
15%
of
district
faculty/staff
will
have
the
opportunity
to
take
part
in
technology­related
professional
in­district.
District
administrative
assistants
have
been
trained
on
new
software
for
student
records
and
purchase
orders.


  • 7. At
Kipling,
our
Tech
Coordinator
will
address
specific
needs
as
they
arise
and
is
very
proactive
in
anticipating
and
planning
for
emerging
needs.
Scheduling
time
to
meet,
however,
is
very
difficult,
as
the
only
common
time
tends
to
be
before
or
after
school.
Occasionally,
the
tech
topics
will
be
introduced
briefly
at
monthly
staff
meetings.

Since
professional
development
for
technology
has
been
quite
limited,
data
is
being
collected
for
both
in­district
and
out­of­district
professional
development.
NCLB,
Part
D,
Section
2402
(5)
states:
“To
enhance
the
ongoing
professional
development
of
teachers,
principals,
and
administrators
by
providing
constant
access
to
training
and
updated
research
in
teaching
and
learning
through
electronic
means.”
Accordingly,
questions
relating
to
faculty/staff
attitudes
towards
a
variety
of
instructional
models
have
been
included.



SLIDE
15:
My
Tech
Plan
–
Goals
Illinois
TIP
requirements
include
the
writing
of
S.M.A.R.T.
Goals,
supported
by
data
analysis.

 S
 Specific
 M
 Measurable
 A
 Attainable
 R
 Realistic
 
 T
 Tangible

Though
not
required,
this
tech
plan
will
include
correlations
to
NETS
and
Illinois
Technology
Standards
for
teachers
as
well
as
NETS
for
Students.


Please
note
that
the
goal
descriptions
that
follow
are
from
the
Illinois
TIP
template
which
has
been
used
to
guide
the
formatting
of
this
project.
The
goals
that
follow
are
those
prescribed
by
the
Illinois
template.
The
strategies
and
activities
are
my
own
and
if
this
plan
were
submitted
for
state
approval,
they
would
appear
in
the
Action
Plan
portion
of
the
document.




SLIDE
16:
Goal
1:
Curriculum
Integration
Description
(from
template):

Improve
student
academic
achievement
through
the
use
of
technology.

Strategy
1:

Provide
teachers
will
reference
resources
and
documents,
in
a
shared
network
folder
and
on
Sharepoint.

 • Activity
1:
Provide
teachers
with
expert
training
on
the
use
of
SharePoint
in
an
 elementary
school
building.
 

  • 8. • Activity
2:
Provide
teachers
with
a
toolbox
of
mini‐lessons,
in
print
and
multimedia
 formats.
 
 • Activity
3:
Provide
teachers
with
graphic
organizers
for
students
and
benchmark
 assessments
on
technology
skills.



SLIDE
17:
Goal
1:
Curriculum
Integration
Strategy
2:
Incorporate
digital
resources
into
classroom
instruction
including
video
streaming
and
web
2.0
technologies.

 • Activity
1:
Students
will
use
blogs
and
wikis
for
communication,
publication,
and
 collaboration.
 
 • Activity
2:
Students
will
use
social
bookmarking
sites
(www.delicious.com)
to
share
 research
on
cooperative
group
projects.

 • Activity
3:
Students
will
use
United
Streaming
to
access
subject
matter
content.

 • Activity
4:
Students
in
grades
four
and
above
will
use
online
collaborative
tools,
 including
Wikispaces
and
SchoolTown.



SLIDE
18:
Goal
2:
Professional
Learning
Description
(from
template):
Ensure
that
all
educators
are
proficient
in
the
use
and
integration
of
technology
and
that
ongoing
professional
development
activities
are
provided


Strategy
1:
Provide
technology
training
to
district
teachers
in
the
use
of
word
processing,
database
management,
spreadsheet
applications,
and
basic
multi‐media
presentations.


 • Activity
1:
Offer
yearly
technology
training,
at
the
building
level,
on
the
use
of
 Microsoft
Word
and
PowerPoint
for
beginning
users
(CPDU
credit).
 
 • Activity
2:
Offer
yearly
technology
training,
at
the
building
level,
on
the
use
of
 Microsoft
Word
and
PowerPoint
for
intermediate
users
(CPDU
credit).


SLIDE
19:
Goal
2:
Professional
Learning

 • Activity
3:

Expand
current
new
teacher
Mentor
Program
from
one
year
to
two.
The
 Year
One
Mentor
will
continue
to
be
a
teacher
at
the
same
grade
level
or
content
 area.
The
Year
Two
Mentor
will
be
an
experienced
technology
user
assigned
to
the

  • 9. same
building
as
the
mentee.
Mentor
stipend,
per
union
contract,
will
apply
to
both
 years.

 
 • Activity
4:
Develop
district‐level
technology
training
for
Classified
Staff,
on
all
new
 software
that
is
used
in
their
positions.

 • Activity
5:
Structure
half‐day
Inservice
meetings
to
provide
increased
computer
 access
for
faculty
and
staff
technology
training.



SLIDE
20:
Goal
2:
Professional
Learning
Strategy
2:
Use
computer‐based
technologies
including
telecommunications
to
access
information
and
enhance
personal
and
professional
productivity.

 • Activity
1:
Teachers
will
use
email
for
building‐
and
district‐level
communication,
 including
opening
and
attaching
files,
creation
of
distribution
lists,
and
management
 of
messages
and
folders.
 
 • Activity
2:
Building
technology
staff
will
provide
professional
development,
for
all
 building
personnel,
on
the
use
of
VOIP
(2009‐2010).

 • Activity
3:
Building
staff
will
contact
Net56
Help
Desk
for
all
network
and
hardware
 issues.


SLIDE
21:
Goal
2:
Professional
Learning

Strategy
3:
Provide
technology
training
to
district
teachers
in
the
use
of
Prometheus
Boards
and
voters.

 • Activity
1:
Expert
trainer
will
provide
professional
development
for
district
 technology
staff
and
teachers
in
pilot
program
(2009‐2010).
 
 • Activity
2:
District
technology
staff
will
provide
professional
development
for
all
 classroom
teachers
(2010‐2011).

 • Activity
3:
Building
technology
staff
will
provide
professional
development
for
all
 faculty/staff
who
will
be
using
Prometheus
Boards
for
the
first
time
(2010‐2011).
 
 • Activity
4:
Building
technology
staff
will
attend
a
minimum
of
one
common
planning
 time
meeting,
per
grade
level,
per
month,
to
provide
feedback
and
additional
 support
to
classroom
teachers
in
the
integration
of
interactive
whiteboard
 technology
in
their
classrooms.

 • Activity
5:
Content‐specific
resources,
for
use
with
Prometheus
Boards,
will
be
 posted
online
(all
plan
years).

  • 10. 

SLIDE
22:
Goal
3:
Evaluation
Description
(from
template):
Develop
a
continuous
process
of
evaluation
and
accountability
for
the
use
of
educational
technology
as
a
teaching
and
learning
tool,
a
measurement
and
analysis
tool
for
student
achievement,
and
a
fiscal
management
tool.

Strategy
1:
Continually
evaluate
the
success
and
progress
of
the
Technology
Plan
based
on
changing
environments.



 • Activity
1:
Monitor
assessment
data
and
review
curriculum
to
ensure
alignment
to
 standards.


SLIDE
23:
Goal
3:
Evaluation

 • Activity
2:
Continue
to
enforce
Acceptable
Use
Policy
for
students
and
staff.

 • Activity
3:
With
Net56,
conduct
yearly
review
of
security
issues
and
needs
as
they
 relate
to
data
transfer
and
storage.

 • Activity
4:
Technology
Plan
Committee
to
meet
quarterly
to
review
progress
of
the
 plan.



SLIDE
24:
In
Conclusion
Once
the
plan
has
been
written,
attention
can
be
focused
on
that
very
critical
issue
of
implementation.
It
is
all
too
common
for
committees
to
spend
tremendous
amounts
of
time
working
on
projects
only
to
have
those
wonderful
documents
filed
away
and
looked
at
only
rarely.
As
the
Technology
Integration
Plan
becomes
increasingly
visible
throughout
the
school
and
community,
technology
leaders
and
Planning
Team
members
will
play
a
critical
role
in
assuring
that
the
plan
is
truly
an
agent
for
positive
change.



×