Dr. Tim McAfee, MD,MPH
Director, CDC Office on Smoking and Health
Tobacco Control and Behavioral Health:
National Networks...
CDC Office on Smoking and Health
VISION
A world free from tobacco-related death and disease
GOALS
Prevent initiation of to...
IDENTIFY
Success with the LGBT Community
Smoking behavior for this population not routinely
available
Pride advocacy group of Puert...
The Burden
Vital Signs: Current Cigarette Smoking Among Adults Aged ≥18 Years with Mental Illness—
United States, 2009–201...
AMI
Vital Signs: Current Cigarette Smoking Among Adults Aged ≥18 Years with Mental Illness—United States,
2009–2011 Februa...
AMI Variation Across Groups
Prevalence lowest among Asians with AMI and
highest for Whites
However: difference in prevalen...
Greater Risk
Mood-altering effects of nicotine
Issues that make it challenging to quit
Lack of knowledge of the health eff...
ELIMINATE
Evidence-Based Interventions
Sustained funding of
comprehensive programs
Price increases
100% smoke-free policies
Hard-hit...
SGR 2014
“ The evidence is sufficient to conclude that tobacco
cessation treatments are effective across a wide
population...
Cessation is Possible
“Research indicates that smoking cessation interventions
with individuals experiencing mental or sub...
Challenges
Tailored
Dissemination
Integration
Carve out
Special services
Challenges
Mental Health/
Substance Abuse
Bipolar
Schizophrenia
Low SES
AI/AN
CDC Initiatives
Healthy People 2020 objectives
HHS Strategic Plan
Best Practices
CDC Initiatives
Research
State Tobacco Program Activities
Collaborations
National Networks
To support a stronger infrastructure to understand
and reach populations experiencing disparities
8 spec...
To prevent and reduce tobacco use and cancer
among those with mental illness and substance
abuse disorders
Tips from Former Smokers
Earned Media
For more information please contact Centers for Disease Control and
Prevention
1600 Clifton Road NE, Atlanta, GA 30333
Tel...
Other Successes
African American Network’s work on Menthol and
Smoke-free policies
Break Free Alliance partnership with NA...
CDC Update: Joining Forces to Reduce Tobacco and Cancer Among Behavioral Health Populations by Tim McAfee, MD, MPH
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CDC Update: Joining Forces to Reduce Tobacco and Cancer Among Behavioral Health Populations by Tim McAfee, MD, MPH

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From the the first Annual National Conference on Tobacco and Behavioral Health, which occurred May 19-20, 2014 in Bethesda, MD and was hosted by the Central East Addiction Technology Transfer Center, a program of The Danya Institute. You can see videos from the conference on our website www.ceattc.org (go to “Tobacco and Behavioral Health Resources” under “Special Topics”).

Tim McAfee, MD, MPH, is Director of CDC’s Office on Smoking and Health (OSH) within the National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion. He is responsible for providing leadership and direction for all scientific, policy, and programmatic issues related to tobacco control and prevention. Before ed his residency training at Group Health Cooperative in Seattle and completed a fellowship at the University of Washington. Dr. McAfee has been a principal investigator and co-investigator on numerous research studies focusing on questions related to the effectiveness and dissemination of telephone- and Web-based tobacco cessation programs in medical systems and through government-sponsored quitlines. He helped found and served on the Board of Directors of the North American Quitline Consortium as well as numerous state and national tobacco policy advisory groups. He also authored the World Health Organization’s quitline manual for low- and middle-income countries.

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CDC Update: Joining Forces to Reduce Tobacco and Cancer Among Behavioral Health Populations by Tim McAfee, MD, MPH

  1. 1. Dr. Tim McAfee, MD,MPH Director, CDC Office on Smoking and Health Tobacco Control and Behavioral Health: National Networks and CDC’s Role National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion Office on Smoking and Health National Conference on Tobacco and Behavioral Health: Interventions, Integration, and Insurance May 19, 2014
  2. 2. CDC Office on Smoking and Health VISION A world free from tobacco-related death and disease GOALS Prevent initiation of tobacco use among youth and young adults Promote tobacco use cessation among adults and youth Eliminate exposure to secondhand smoke Identify and eliminate tobacco-related disparities
  3. 3. IDENTIFY
  4. 4. Success with the LGBT Community Smoking behavior for this population not routinely available Pride advocacy group of Puerto Rico worked with the National Latino Tobacco Network and the Network for LGBT Tobacco Control Data collected at the 2009 PRIDE fest used to demonstrate to decision makers the value of adding questions to the national tobacco survey
  5. 5. The Burden Vital Signs: Current Cigarette Smoking Among Adults Aged ≥18 Years with Mental Illness— United States, 2009–2011 February 8, 2013 / Vol. 62 /
  6. 6. AMI Vital Signs: Current Cigarette Smoking Among Adults Aged ≥18 Years with Mental Illness—United States, 2009–2011 February 8, 2013 / Vol. 62 /
  7. 7. AMI Variation Across Groups Prevalence lowest among Asians with AMI and highest for Whites However: difference in prevalence between Asians with AMI and without was highest of any group 2X higher overall 3X higher for women Vital Signs: Current Cigarette Smoking Among Adults Aged ≥18 Years with Mental Illness— United States, 2009–2011 February 8, 2013 / Vol. 62 /
  8. 8. Greater Risk Mood-altering effects of nicotine Issues that make it challenging to quit Lack of knowledge of the health effects Tobacco industry targeting Vital Signs: Current Cigarette Smoking Among Adults Aged ≥18 Years with Mental Illness—United States, 2009–2011 February 8, 2013 / Vol. 62 /
  9. 9. ELIMINATE
  10. 10. Evidence-Based Interventions Sustained funding of comprehensive programs Price increases 100% smoke-free policies Hard-hitting media campaigns Cessation access
  11. 11. SGR 2014 “ The evidence is sufficient to conclude that tobacco cessation treatments are effective across a wide population of smokers, including those with significant mental and physical comorbidity” Chapter 14: Conclusion 8
  12. 12. Cessation is Possible “Research indicates that smoking cessation interventions with individuals experiencing mental or substance use disorders are feasible, beneficial, and needed.” “Smokers with mental illness can quit and remain abstinent from cigarettes during mental health treatment, and that this is a promising setting to promote smoking cessation.” The health consequences of smoking – 50 years of progress: a report of the Surgeon General. – Atlanta, GA. : U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health, 2014. Chapter 12- Appendix 14.4. Pages 10-11.
  13. 13. Challenges Tailored Dissemination Integration Carve out Special services
  14. 14. Challenges Mental Health/ Substance Abuse Bipolar Schizophrenia Low SES AI/AN
  15. 15. CDC Initiatives Healthy People 2020 objectives HHS Strategic Plan Best Practices
  16. 16. CDC Initiatives Research State Tobacco Program Activities Collaborations
  17. 17. National Networks To support a stronger infrastructure to understand and reach populations experiencing disparities 8 specific networks National African American Tobacco Prevention Inter-Tribal Council of Michigan Asian Pacific Partners for Empowerment, Advocacy, & Leadership National Alliance for Hispanic Health Centerlink National Council for Behavioral Health Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America (Low Socioeconomic)
  18. 18. To prevent and reduce tobacco use and cancer among those with mental illness and substance abuse disorders
  19. 19. Tips from Former Smokers
  20. 20. Earned Media
  21. 21. For more information please contact Centers for Disease Control and Prevention 1600 Clifton Road NE, Atlanta, GA 30333 Telephone, 1-800-CDC-INFO (232-4636)/TTY: 1-888-232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web: www.cdc.gov The findings and conclusions in this report are those of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official position of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
  22. 22. Other Successes African American Network’s work on Menthol and Smoke-free policies Break Free Alliance partnership with NAQC to review Quit Line use for Low SES and Blacks APPEAL assisted MN to develop a comprehensive plan for addressing diverse communities LGBT Network spearheaded initiative to expand data collection across HHS AI/AN network trained tribes and implemented the AI ATS
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