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0495808652 282842
0495808652 282842
0495808652 282842
0495808652 282842
0495808652 282842
0495808652 282842
0495808652 282842
0495808652 282842
0495808652 282842
0495808652 282842
0495808652 282842
0495808652 282842
0495808652 282842
0495808652 282842
0495808652 282842
0495808652 282842
0495808652 282842
0495808652 282842
0495808652 282842
0495808652 282842
0495808652 282842
0495808652 282842
0495808652 282842
0495808652 282842
0495808652 282842
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0495808652 282842

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  • Learning Objective One
  • Learning Objective One
  • Learning Objective Two
  • Learning Objective Two
  • Learning Objective Two
  • Learning Objective Three
  • Learning Objective Three
  • Learning Objective Three
  • Learning Objective Three
  • Learning Objective Three
  • Learning Objective Three
  • Learning Objective Three
  • Learning Objective Four
  • Learning Objective Four
  • Learning Objective Four
  • Learning Objective Four
  • Learning Objective Four
  • Learning Objective Five
  • Learning Objective Five
  • Learning Objective Five
  • Learning Objective Five
  • Learning Objective Four
  • Learning Objective Four
  • Transcript

    • 1. CorrectionalIssues
    • 2. Reentry into the Community
    • 3.  Most Inmates Eventually Released into Society  Over three-fourths will be on parole  Parole ▪ Grace or privilege ▪ Contract of consent ▪ Custody
    • 4.  Number of Adults under Parole Supervision, 1980-2007.
    • 5.  Maconochie  Classification procedure ▪ Strict imprisonment ▪ Labor on chain gangs ▪ Freedom within a limited area ▪ Ticket-of-leave or parole with conditional pardon ▪ Full restoration of liberty
    • 6.  Crofton  Progress through prison and ticket-of-leave linked  Parole included a series of conditions ▪ Report monthly to police
    • 7.  United States  Brockway ▪ Elmira Reformatory  Indeterminate sentencing followed by parole  U.S. Board of Parole
    • 8.  Methods of Release from State Prison
    • 9.  Discretionary Release Mandatory Release Probation Release Reinstatement Release Other Conditional Releases Expiration Release
    • 10.  Procedure  Eligibility ▪ Sentence ▪ Statutory criteria ▪ Conduct prior to incarceration ▪ Often minimum sentence minus good time ▪ Parole board discretion ▪ One-third to one-half of the maximum sentence
    • 11.  Release Criteria  Normally include at least eight factors ▪ Offense ▪ Prior criminal record ▪ Attitudes ▪ Institutional adjustment/participation/progress ▪ History of community adjustment ▪ Physical, mental, and emotional health ▪ Insight into causes of past criminal conduct ▪ Adequacy of parole plan
    • 12.  Release Criteria  Discretionary ▪ Moral judgments ▪ Culpability ▪ Adequacy of sentence ▪ DNA ▪ Legal and ethical issues
    • 13.  Structuring Parole Decisions  Parole guidelines  Three criteria ▪ Substantial observance of institutional rules ▪ Release will not devalue seriousness of offense or promote disrespect for the law ▪ Release will not jeopardize public welfare
    • 14.  The Impact of Release Mechanisms  Shorten a sentence  Encourages plea bargaining  Mitigates the harshness of the penal code  Reduce prison populations
    • 15.  Second Chance Act of 2007  Provides federal grants to states and communities to support reentry initiatives ▪ Employment ▪ Housing ▪ substance abuse ▪ Mental health treatment ▪ Children and family services
    • 16.  Community Supervision  Conditions of release ▪ Abstain from alcohol ▪ Stay away from undesirable associates ▪ maintain good work habits ▪ Do not leave the community without permission
    • 17.  Revocation  Parole can be revoked for two reasons ▪ Committing a new crime ▪ Violating conditions of parole  In practice ▪ Usually requires persistent non-compliance or ▪ Arrest on a serious charge  Supreme Court requirements
    • 18.  Revocation  Percentage of Prison Admissions Who are Parole Violators
    • 19.  Parole Officer  Surveillance ▪ Restriction ▪ Enforcement ▪ Revocation  Assistance ▪ Jobs ▪ Families ▪ Human service agencies
    • 20.  The Strangeness of Reentry  Changes  Unfamiliar freedom Supervision and Surveillance  Not really free
    • 21.  The Problem of Unmet Personal Needs  Education  Money  Job  Drug and alcohol problems  Mental health  Housing
    • 22.  Barriers to Success  Employment ▪ Conviction viewed as untrustworthy ▪ Statutory bars ▪ Expungement ▪ Pardon
    • 23.  Barriers to Success  Civil disabilities ▪ Right to vote and hold public office ▪ “War on Drugs” ▪ Access to public assistance and food stamps ▪ Living in public housing ▪ Having a driver’s license ▪ Being a foster parent or adopting children ▪ Receiving student loans
    • 24.  Four Factors  Get substance abuse under control.  Get a job.  Develop a support group of family and friends.  Get a sense of “who I am.”
    • 25.  Reentry Courts  Judicial supervision  Emphasis on involvement of judicial and correctional officials in ▪ Prerelease needs of prisoner ▪ Linkages to family ▪ Social services ▪ Housing ▪ Employment

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