0131389033 ppt12

749 views
629 views

Published on

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
749
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
26
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
7
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

0131389033 ppt12

  1. 1. CJ 2011 James A. Fagin Chapter 12The Juvenile Justice System: The Youthful Offender
  2. 2. After completion of this chapter, students should be able to: Describe the goals of the juvenile criminal justice system Discuss major court cases that shaped due process rights of juvenile offenders Explain why states are beginning to hold juveniles more accountable for crime Detail how juveniles are processed through the juvenile justice system  Talk about strategies being used to reduce violence in schoolsCJ 2011 © 2011 Pearson Higher Education,James A. Fagin Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. • All Rights Reserved. 2
  3. 3.  The New York House of Refuge juvenile reformatory was established in 1824  In 1865, any child could be sent to the House of Refuge in New York upon the complaint of a guardian  In 1849, 21% of Maryland penitentiary prisoners were between the ages of 10 and 20 % were between 12 and 20, and 21% were between 10 and 20CJ 2011 © 2011 Pearson Higher Education,James A. Fagin Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. • All Rights Reserved. 3
  4. 4.  Concept of parens patriae allows state government to act in place of parents. First juvenile court established in 1899 in Cook County, Illinois. Juvenile courts remove the child from authority of adult criminal courtsCJ 2011 © 2011 Pearson Higher Education,James A. Fagin Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. • All Rights Reserved. 4
  5. 5.  Status offenders: a child who commits an act that if they were adults, the court would not have any authority over them (i.e. runaways)  Delinquents: juveniles who commit an act that is criminal for both adults and juvenilesCJ 2011 © 2011 Pearson Higher Education,James A. Fagin Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. • All Rights Reserved. 5
  6. 6.  Kent v. United States (1966)  In re Gault (1967)  In re Winship (1970)  McKeiver v. Pennsylvania (1971)CJ 2011 © 2011 Pearson Higher Education,James A. Fagin Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. • All Rights Reserved. 6
  7. 7. Juvenile court proceedings are not open for the public to viewSome exceptions: Oklahoma Publishing Company v. District Court in and for Oklahoma City Smith v. Daily Mail Publishing CompanyCJ 2011 © 2011 Pearson Higher Education,James A. Fagin Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. • All Rights Reserved. 7
  8. 8.  The processing of youthful offenders through the juvenile justice system is quite different from that of the adult system Forces acting on the juvenile justice system make juveniles who commit violent crimes more accountable for their actionsCJ 2011 © 2011 Pearson Higher Education,James A. Fagin Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. • All Rights Reserved. 8
  9. 9. Does the youthful offender have sufficient mens rea to appreciate the criminality of his or her act? Many argue youthful offenders: Are not fully responsible for their criminal actions s Do not have the same mens rea or criminal intent as adults, due to their youthCJ 2011 © 2011 Pearson Higher Education,James A. Fagin Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. • All Rights Reserved. 9
  10. 10.  About 25 states have adopted a Blended Sentencing Option to create a ‘middle ground’ between traditional juvenile sanctions and adult sanctions  Blended sentencing can originate with either the juvenile court or the criminal courtCJ 2011 © 2011 Pearson Higher Education,James A. Fagin Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. • All Rights Reserved. 10
  11. 11. There are more differences among states in the processing of juveniles in the juvenile justice system than there are in the processing of adults in the criminal justice systemCJ 2011 © 2011 Pearson Higher Education,James A. Fagin Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. • All Rights Reserved. 11
  12. 12.  Intake – the process whereby a juvenile enters the juvenile justice system  Referral – the process where juveniles are referred (by a parent/guardian, school official, social worker, juvenile probation officer, or juvenile court officer) into the juvenile justice systemCJ 2011 © 2011 Pearson Higher Education,James A. Fagin Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. • All Rights Reserved. 12
  13. 13.  Juvenile Adjudication Hearing  Delinquency Petition  Teen Courts  Juvenile Drug Courts  Detention and Probation (Aftercare)  Residential Placement  Juvenile Probation (Aftercare)  Juvenile Boot Camps  Juvenile Death Penalty  Life Sentence Without ParoleCJ 2011 © 2011 Pearson Higher Education,James A. Fagin Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. • All Rights Reserved. 13
  14. 14. Much attention is focused on explaining why juveniles commit crimesCJ 2011 © 2011 Pearson Higher Education,James A. Fagin Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. • All Rights Reserved. 14
  15. 15.  Child delinquents (between 7 and 12) are two to three times more likely to become serious, violent, and chronic offenders than adolescents whose delinquent behavior begins in their teens  Antisocial careers of male juvenile offender start, on average, at age 7  Preschool period is critical in setting a foundation for preventing the development of delinquencyCJ 2011 © 2011 Pearson Higher Education,James A. Fagin Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. • All Rights Reserved. 15
  16. 16.  Hybrid Youth Gangs  Have younger members  Have more female members  Less involved in drugs/violent crimes than traditional youth gangs  Female Gangs  Females tend to leave the gang around age 20  Commit fewer violent crimes than male gang members  Tend to join gangs because of victimization at homeCJ 2011 © 2011 Pearson Higher Education,James A. Fagin Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. • All Rights Reserved. 16
  17. 17.  National Youth Anti-Drug Campaign  Drug Abuse Resistance Education (DARE) Growing Problems:  Methamphetamine use  Prescription drug abuseCJ 2011 © 2011 Pearson Higher Education,James A. Fagin Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. • All Rights Reserved. 17
  18. 18.  Preventing school violence has become an important goal  Attempts are made to reduce weapons on school property  Attempts are made to reduce bullyingCJ 2011 © 2011 Pearson Higher Education,James A. Fagin Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. • All Rights Reserved. 18
  19. 19.  Reducing weapons on school property  Metal detectors  Paying for information  Reducing bullying  Increasing police presenceCJ 2011 © 2011 Pearson Higher Education,James A. Fagin Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. • All Rights Reserved. 19
  20. 20.  Banning of cell phones  Transferring troublemakers to the juvenile court  Expelling of disruptive/violent studentsCJ 2011 © 2011 Pearson Higher Education,James A. Fagin Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. • All Rights Reserved. 20
  21. 21. Children are vulnerable victims to certain crimes, and the public and criminal justice system work to protect them from victimizationCJ 2011 © 2011 Pearson Higher Education,James A. Fagin Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. • All Rights Reserved. 21
  22. 22.  Violence Against Children  Sexual Exploitation and Child Pornography  Child Pornography and the Internet  Missing ChildrenCJ 2011 © 2011 Pearson Higher Education,James A. Fagin Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. • All Rights Reserved. 22
  23. 23.  Megan’s Law: requires sex offenders to register with state law enforcement officials, and this registration is available to the public  AMBER Alerts: allows law enforcement officials to alert the public of a missing or abducted childCJ 2011 © 2011 Pearson Higher Education,James A. Fagin Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. • All Rights Reserved. 23

×