CJ 2011       James A. Fagin         Chapter 11:Corrections in the Community
After completion of this chapter, students should be able to: Explain why federal and state government are turning to com...
     In 2004, more than 7 million people were       on probation, in jail or prison, or on parole      7% of the U.S. ad...
     Record number of prisoners being released      Lack of support services      Infrequent contact with parole office...
     Citizen opposition to having community-based       corrections in their neighborhood      Crime victims and police ...
     Developed out of response to overcrowding       and skyrocketing costs      Early programs not built upon research ...
     Intensive Probation Supervision Programs      Split Sentencing and Shock Probation      Shock Incarceration (Boot ...
     Provides direct and strict supervision      Parole officer has a smaller caseload and more       emphasis is placed...
     After a brief period of imprisonment, usually in       a jail for as little as 30 days rather than in a       long-t...
     Modeled after military-style, entry-level       training programs      Boot camps are designed to provide alternati...
     Ordered to remain confined in their own       residence      Schedules are worked out that allow the       offender...
     Treatment programs are needed that focus on          preparing inmate for reentry         Department of Justice (20...
     Work Release      Education Release      Halfway Houses      Day Reporting CentersCJ 2011                        ...
     The large percentage of those arrested        under the influence of illicit drugs has led to        the creation of...
         The operations and components of drug courts vary from          jurisdiction to jurisdiction, but the following ...
1.         A coordinated strategy governs drug court responses            to participants’ compliance. 2.         Ongoing ...
     Adult Drug Courts      Tribal Drug Courts (Native Americans)      Treatment Accountability for Safer       Communi...
     Buffalo, N.Y. Veterans court first of its kind      Modeled after mental health courts      Goal is to help adjust...
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0131389033 ppt11

  1. 1. CJ 2011 James A. Fagin Chapter 11:Corrections in the Community
  2. 2. After completion of this chapter, students should be able to: Explain why federal and state government are turning to community corrections sanctions Describe opposition to community corrections sanctions Describe the various sanctions used by the criminal justice system Detail new strategies are being used to promote reentry into the community for ex-offenders Explain the purpose of adult drug courtCJ 2011 © 2011 Pearson Higher Education,James A. Fagin Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. • All Rights Reserved. 2
  3. 3.  In 2004, more than 7 million people were on probation, in jail or prison, or on parole  7% of the U.S. adult population (13 million persons) have spent time in prison for a felony conviction)  2 out of 3 adults who are released will be rearrested within 3 yearsCJ 2011 © 2011 Pearson Higher Education,James A. Fagin Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. • All Rights Reserved. 3
  4. 4.  Record number of prisoners being released  Lack of support services  Infrequent contact with parole officer  Failure affects: child abuse, family violence, infectious diseases, or homelessnessCJ 2011 © 2011 Pearson Higher Education,James A. Fagin Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. • All Rights Reserved. 4
  5. 5.  Citizen opposition to having community-based corrections in their neighborhood  Crime victims and police fear reoffending if released  NIMBY, meaning ‘not in my backyard’CJ 2011 © 2011 Pearson Higher Education,James A. Fagin Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. • All Rights Reserved. 5
  6. 6.  Developed out of response to overcrowding and skyrocketing costs  Early programs not built upon research  Many programs lacked safeguards for community protectionCJ 2011 © 2011 Pearson Higher Education,James A. Fagin Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. • All Rights Reserved. 6
  7. 7.  Intensive Probation Supervision Programs  Split Sentencing and Shock Probation  Shock Incarceration (Boot Camps)  Home Confinement and Electronic MonitoringCJ 2011 © 2011 Pearson Higher Education,James A. Fagin Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. • All Rights Reserved. 7
  8. 8.  Provides direct and strict supervision  Parole officer has a smaller caseload and more emphasis is placed on offender compliance with the conditions of supervisionCJ 2011 © 2011 Pearson Higher Education,James A. Fagin Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. • All Rights Reserved. 8
  9. 9.  After a brief period of imprisonment, usually in a jail for as little as 30 days rather than in a long-term confinement facility, the offender is brought back to court  Judge then offer offender probationCJ 2011 © 2011 Pearson Higher Education,James A. Fagin Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. • All Rights Reserved. 9
  10. 10.  Modeled after military-style, entry-level training programs  Boot camps are designed to provide alternative sentencing for young, nonviolent offenders  Adapts military-style physical fitness and disciplineCJ 2011 © 2011 Pearson Higher Education,James A. Fagin Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. • All Rights Reserved. 10
  11. 11.  Ordered to remain confined in their own residence  Schedules are worked out that allow the offender to leave his or her home for work, medical appointments and services, court- ordered treatmentCJ 2011 © 2011 Pearson Higher Education,James A. Fagin Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. • All Rights Reserved. 11
  12. 12.  Treatment programs are needed that focus on preparing inmate for reentry  Department of Justice (2004) funded $6.7 million to the Serious and Violent Offender Reentry Initiative to improve public safety  New reentry strategies include Faith-Based programs conducted by religious based groupsCJ 2011 © 2011 Pearson Higher Education,James A. Fagin Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. • All Rights Reserved. 12
  13. 13.  Work Release  Education Release  Halfway Houses  Day Reporting CentersCJ 2011 © 2011 Pearson Higher Education,James A. Fagin Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. • All Rights Reserved. 13
  14. 14.  The large percentage of those arrested under the influence of illicit drugs has led to the creation of drug courts  First tried as an experiment in Dade County, Florida (1989)  This new strategy has been proven to be effectiveCJ 2011 © 2011 Pearson Higher Education,James A. Fagin Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. • All Rights Reserved. 14
  15. 15.  The operations and components of drug courts vary from jurisdiction to jurisdiction, but the following 10 key components identify state adult drug court programs as prescribed by the Drug Courts Program offer:3. Drug courts integrate alcohol and other drug treatment services with justice system case processing.4. Using a nonadversarial approach, prosecution and defense counsel promote public safety while protecting participants’ due process rights.5. Eligible participants are identified early and promptly placed in the drug court program.6. Drug courts provide access to a continuum of alcohol, drug, and other related treatment and rehabilitation services.7. Abstinence is monitored by frequent alcohol and other drug testing. CJ 2011 © 2011 Pearson Higher Education, James A. Fagin Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. • All Rights Reserved. 15
  16. 16. 1. A coordinated strategy governs drug court responses to participants’ compliance. 2. Ongoing judicial interaction with each drug court participant is essential. 3. Monitoring and evaluation measure the achievement of program goals and gauge effectiveness. 4. Continuing interdisciplinary education promotes effective drug court planning, implementation, and operations. 5. Forging partnerships among drug courts, public agencies, and community based organizations generates local support and enhances drug court effectiveness.CJ 2011 © 2011 Pearson Higher Education,James A. Fagin Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. • All Rights Reserved. 16
  17. 17.  Adult Drug Courts  Tribal Drug Courts (Native Americans)  Treatment Accountability for Safer Communities (TASC)  Residential Substance Abuse Treatment (RSAT)  Note $2.5 million saved by drug court programs versus incarcerationCJ 2011 © 2011 Pearson Higher Education,James A. Fagin Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. • All Rights Reserved. 17
  18. 18.  Buffalo, N.Y. Veterans court first of its kind  Modeled after mental health courts  Goal is to help adjust to civilian life and eliminate anti-social or criminal behaviors  Some argue separate court is unfair to other groupsCJ 2011 © 2011 Pearson Higher Education,James A. Fagin Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. • All Rights Reserved. 18
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