Working In Canada Tool English

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  • Working in Canada uses both traditional & internet-based methods of outreach. We will now take a look at each of these methods in more detail.

Transcript

  • 1. www.WorkinginCanada.gc.ca Working in Canada Tool & Community Finder Tool November 2009
  • 2. Outline
    • Working in Canada (WiC) Tool
      • Demonstration
      • Who is using the Tool
      • What is being searched
      • Promotion
      • Partnership Opportunity
    • Community Finder Tool
      • Background
      • Preview
    New
  • 3.
      • www.WorkinginCanada.gc.ca
    Demonstration
  • 4. Usage Highlights
      • Over 1,150,000 reports produced
        • 8 minutes average visit time
        • Users from over 170 countries.
        • Over 75% client traffic from outside of Canada
  • 5. CIC Promo Google Adwords Usage Highlights: Reports Generated
  • 6. Usage Highlights: Top Countries
  • 7. Usage Highlights: Ontario
    • About 40% of reports are for Ontario (~440,000)
    • Top Searched Occupations:
      • Engineers 6.5%;
      • Accountants 6.1%;
      • Technicians 2.2%;
      • Teachers 3.0%;
      • Nurses 2.6%;
      • Doctors 2.2%
  • 8. Usage Highlights: Ontario (August ‘09)
    • Toronto (49.18%)
    • Ottawa (11.94%)
    • Mississauga, Brampton, Oakville & Peel (11.46%)
    • Hamilton and Area (4.63%)
    • Belleville and Quinte Area (2.78%)
    • Vaughan, Markham, Newmarket, & York (2.78%)
    • London and Woodstock Area (2.32%)
    • Niagara and Area (2.14%)
    • Waterloo, Huron, Perth, Wellington, Dufferin (1.86%)
    • Brantford and Area (1.68%)
    • Oshawa, Whitby and Durham Regional Area (1.47%)
  • 9. Usage Highlights: Ontario (August 09)
    • Cornwall and Area (1.43%)
    • Kingston and Area (1.43%)
    • Windsor / Essex, Chatham-Kent, Sarnia / Lambton Region (1.26%)
    • Bruce, Grey, Simcoe, Muskoka District (1.18%)
    • Kenora and Area (0.51%)
    • Peterborough and Kawartha Area (0.44%)
    • Timmins and Area (0.38%)
    • North Bay and Area (0.35%)
    • Thunder Bay and Area (0.34%)
    • Sudbury and Area (0.25%)
    • Sault Ste. Marie and Area (0.20%)
  • 10. Promotion of WorkinginCanada.gc.ca
    • Traditional Methods
    • Bookmarks and fact sheets
    • Presentations
    • Training sessions
    • Internet-based Methods
    • Search Engine Optimization
    • Google AdWords
    • Social Media
    • Skinning
    • Widget!! Widget!!
  • 11. WorkinginCanada.gc.ca Widget
    • Working in Canada Widget (WiC Widget) can be added to websites
    • The WiC Widget is free and requires no technical maintenance.
    • The WiC Widget provides access to:
      • The WorkinginCanada.gc.ca video library;
      • Useful Facts about immigrating, working and settling in Canada; and
      • Direct access to the Working in Canada Tool = comprehensive suite of labour market information that is customizable and updated daily.
  • 12. WiC Widget on Your Website
  • 13. New
      • Community Finder Tool
  • 14. The Community Finder Tool
    • Community Finder (CF) Tool is an internet application to help a person select settlement location based on labour market and community characteristics.
    • Quick Facts:
      • Tool will complement WiC Tool “location” selection.
      • Objective: raise awareness of the thousands of cities and towns where newcomers can choose to live and work = informed settlement decision.
  • 15. Background: Why develop CF Tool?
    • Because….
    • Where a newcomer chooses to live will impact occupational prospects, job opportunities and salary.
    • Most newcomers settle in Canada’s three largest cities. ( http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/071204/tdq071204-eng.htm )
      • Toronto, Montreal & Vancouver home to 68.9% of recent immigrants (2006).
      • These cities are among the most expensive in Canada.
    • According to the Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation, housing costs should not be more than 32% of monthly gross household income.
    • ( http://www.cmhc-schl.gc.ca/en/co/buho/hostst/hostst_002.cfm )
    • Immigrants face higher unemployment than their Canadian counterparts. ( http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/080513/dq080513a-eng.htm )
  • 16. Background: Why develop CF Tool? (cont’d…)
    • “ large majority [of newcomers] said their decision about where to settle in Canada would have been affected by information about where they would be more likely to find a job , as well as the cost of living in different cities…”
    • (2007-2008 Public Opinion Research conducted on the Working in Canada website, 52)
    • “ the Working in Canada Tool should allow users to derive comparative reports for their occupation across provinces and cities and this should include a cost of living index (rather than wages alone)”
    • (2007-2008 Report from the Association of Canadian Community Colleges – Canadian Immigration Integration Project, 4)
  • 17.
    • 1) What is your occupation?
      • Choose from 520 NOC codes
      • Same interface as the WiC Tool
    • 2) In which language do you want to work?
      • Opportunity to reinforce the importance of Canada’s two official languages for working
    • 3) Do you want to live in a large or small community?
      • Three choices will be provided:
        • Under 60,000;
        • 60,000-300,000;
        • Over 300,000.
      • Opportunity to highlight that health and social services are available in communities of all shapes and sizes.
    CF Tool: 3 Questions to Help Newcomers
  • 18.
    • By Occupational Demand
      • Select good, fair, or limited prospects to discover where your occupation is in demand.
    • By Housing Affordability
      • By comparing local wages of the client’s occupation to local housing costs, communities are ordered from most affordable to least (housing costs expressed as a % of gross income).
    Results can be Refined
  • 19. Feedback so far…
    • Feedback: profile additional elements…
      • More communities & rural communities
      • Official language minority communities
      • Relative taxation rates
      • Costs of utilities and insurance
      • Available religious worship centres
      • Major industries
      • Commuting distances and times
    • Challenges: data availability, 1000’s communities vs economic regions.
  • 20. Questions? Comments?
    • Please contact:
      • [email_address]
      • www.workingincanada.gc.ca
    • www.travailleraucanada.gc.ca