New Models for News

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Needs some updating to flesh it out, but here's a quick-hit overview for my class today.

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  • e.g., artificial attempts at exclusivity via paywalls, etc.
  • e.g., artificial attempts at exclusivity via paywalls, etc.
  • e.g., artificial attempts at exclusivity via paywalls, etc.
  • New Models for News

    1. 1. New Models for News Seth C. Lewis School of Journalism, University of Texas at Austin [email_address]
    2. 2. Two kinds of models: Journalism and Business
    3. 3. Journalism Models: How is news ‘made’ ?
    4. 4. Business Models: How do we pay for it ?
    5. 5. What about changing both at the same time?
    6. 6. Either way, it’s about creating value (social, civic and economic)
    7. 7. How journalists create value <ul><li>A conduit for specialized knowledge </li></ul><ul><ul><li>1. Accessing sources with key info </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>2. Determining significance of info </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>3. Conveying it effectively </li></ul></ul><ul><li>See: Robert Picard , “Why journalists deserve low pay” </li></ul>
    8. 8. Control Exclusivity Scarcity
    9. 9. Digitization changes that “Today, ordinary adults can observe and report news, gather expert knowledge, determine significance, add audio, photography, and video components, and publish this content far and wide (or at least to their social network) with ease. And much of this is done for no pay. Until journalists can redefine the value of their labor above this level, they deserve low pay.”
    10. 10. Lack of control Commodity Abundance
    11. 11. Do you fight change ?
    12. 12. Or do you pursue new ways to create value ?
    13. 13. Changing the news value equation Old value(s) New value(s) Pros gathered the info from traditional sources Pros gather from broader base of expertise (i.e., you) Pros decide what’s news, what goes on front page Still do, but users improve the choices, add value Pros say: come to us – our newscast, our website “ Hyperdistribution” – news comes to you via networks Paid for whole package, even for stuff didn’t want Commodity news is free; specialty can demand fee
    14. 14. Changing natures of Publics and Subsidy
    15. 15. Key shifts for the future <ul><li>We see journalism as an activity </li></ul><ul><li>Citizens may participate directly … but pros provide value: vet, train, aggregate and curate </li></ul><ul><li>Pros use diverse tools ( human and machine ) and display news in new ways (e.g., data visualization ) and in new formats (e.g., wiki explainers ) </li></ul>
    16. 16. Emerging models and examples <ul><li>Aggregation and attitude (Huffington Post) </li></ul><ul><li>Low-cost, non-profit civic venture (Voice of San Diego, MinnPost) </li></ul><ul><li>Crowdsourcing and crowdfunding (Spot.Us) </li></ul><ul><li>Citizen journalism (NowPublic) </li></ul><ul><li>Specialized expertise (Politico) </li></ul><ul><li>Hyperlocal/hyperpersonal (Everyblock, social media apps) </li></ul>

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