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SETDA Briefing May 2010

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  • Once it starts pictures will cycle for 5:30 automatically. Advance to the next slide and it will repeat for another 5:30 or until you advance to your video. You may have to click/hit the space bar 2x to advance the slides, but be careful not to move too fast.
  • Plays for 5:30. You can stop it by advancing to the next slide. One click/space bar press will bring you the collage of images; the next will advance to the next slide.
  • To insert video from Lan.
  • As we highlight the National Educational Technology Trends Report I specifically want to discuss Driving Innovations and New Education Models and how states can scale them up for success. National investments in educational technology are critical to both of these areas. Title II D is the only federal educational program with funds explicitly targeted to support state and local effective uses of educational technology.
  • How do you take the vision of a leader and bring it to reality in a short time frame? Let’s look at this model. We have our traditional model of instructional delivery. In Alabama we have the largest state department run virtual school and the second largest state virtual school (and we are only 4 years old) so we also have online and interactive video conference modes of delivery statewide. We are then blending together virtual and face-to-face learning. In these models the emphasis has shifted from technology to designs for learning that increase instructional effectiveness. All of these together with a 21 st Century Classroom environment can lead to the personalized mode of instruction that research says is the most effective. What does this take to implement? Establishing effective instructional methods that leverage digital innovations. Funds from various sources take to scale the successful models.
  • To change education we must first change teaching. The online and blended learning model utilizing technology resources can be the impetus for this change. Professional development offered through Title II D grants are essential to bringing to scale ALL teachers implementing a blended instruction. Online professional development for teachers and communities of practice are growing. Our Alabama eLearning for Educators grant funded by federal dollars this last spring offered 62 sessions of 27 different courses to 1,260 teachers and administrators. We had over 560 teachers teaching adjunct for ACCESS Distance Learning. Debbie Page, an online and face-to-face teacher discusses the impact these new teaching models are having on her instruction.
  • Having digital content in an easy sharable format in various formats for ALL teachers is key. In Alabama we have used Title II D state administrative funds as noted in the Trends Report to support the development and sharing of digital content in a web portal available to everyone, called ALEX the Alabama Learning Exchange ALEX was recognized nationally as a 2009 “ Best of the Web” Award winner [ National Center for Digital Education ]. It averages over 100,000 unique visitors per month. Tripled online interactive multimedia resources since January 2007. Resources total over 60,000 links to current, official state Courses of Study. New feature, gallery360 o , hosts podcasts linked to the Alabama Courses of Study.
  • Student Engagement! I think these kids are loving their music course as they talk live with a popular band in their recording studio. State leadership arranged all the logistics that included connecting 12 schools. What better way to have interactive, real-world, collaborative learning that research indicates will optimize engagement and learning for persons of all ages.
  • Increasing Graduation Rate is a major goal throughout the U.S. Research and proven practices are showing that technology can play a major role in meeting the needs of ALL students so they ALL graduate college and career ready. The graduation rate of one of our inner city schools has increased 14% in two short years after implementing several technology initiatives including online and 1:1. Other results included the number of students taking foreign languagues has almost tripled, students have more confidence in their ability to be successful in more advanced coursework, and this school had the first AP course in the school’s history being delivery via distance learning.
  • No one can say it better than the kids. Once they are given the opportunities their world is opened up. Play video True equity for all students is a must if the U.S. is to continue to be competitive. The use of technology to make this happen is the only cost-effective way to have high quality, highly effective teachers for ALL students regardless of where they live.
  • What are others saying?
  • Title II D serves as a complement to investments through other federal funds such as School Improvement, eRate and Title I. It serves as innovation funds for State Funded Scale up Models. Most of all—it takes all of the funds working together to develop and implement an educational delivery model that personalizes instruction to the needs of each individual student to prepare them for college and careers. We must continue and add dedicated funding streams throughout all of these funds to support technology innovation to move our nation into new realms of possibilities for ALL students.
  • You must CLICK to start the movie playing. <object width="400" height="300"><param name="allowfullscreen" value="true" /><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always" /><param name="movie" value="http://vimeo.com/moogaloop.swf?clip_id=11991321&server=vimeo.com&show_title=1&show_byline=1&show_portrait=0&color=&fullscreen=1" /><embed src="http://vimeo.com/moogaloop.swf?clip_id=11991321&server=vimeo.com&show_title=1&show_byline=1&show_portrait=0&color=&fullscreen=1" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowfullscreen="true" allowscriptaccess="always" width="400" height="300"></embed></object><p><a href="http://vimeo.com/11991321">SETDA Briefing</a> from <a href="http://vimeo.com/user3367589">SETDA</a> on <a href="http://vimeo.com">Vimeo</a>.</p> Click again to PAUSE the movie, if you want.
  • Acknowledge SETDA staff and membership

Transcript

  • 1. Fostering Excellence, Equity and Innovation through Technology (ESEA Title IID) May 17, 2010 State Educational Technology Directors Association www.setda.org www.twitter.com/setda
  • 2. SETDA: Improving Student Achievement Through Technology
    • Serve, support, and represent all 50+ state directors (SEA leadership) for educational technology
    • Work collectively and in partnership with other national organizations
    • Forum for:
      • Research and best practices
      • Inter-state collaboration
      • Professional development
      • Public-private partnerships
      • State-federal relations
  • 3. EETT (ESEA Title IID): Innovation Through State Leadership
    • Scaling Up Success
    • Enhancing Teacher Effectiveness
    • Using Data to Inform Teaching, Learning & Leadership
    • Increasing Academic Achievement
    • Driving Innovation and New Models
  • 4. Today’s Presenters
    • Mr. Lan Neugent
    • Assistant Superintendent for
    • Technology, Career and Adult
    • Education
    • Virginia Department of Education
    • Dr. Melinda Maddox
    • State Educational Technology Director
    • Alabama Department of Education
    • Mr. Bruce Umpstead
    • State Director for Educational
    • Technology & Data Coordination
    • Michigan Department of Education
  • 5.  
  • 6.  
  • 7.  
  • 8.  
  • 9.  
  • 10.  
  • 11. Today’s Presenters
    • Mr. Lan Neugent
    • Assistant Superintendent for
    • Technology, Career and Adult
    • Education
    • Virginia Department of Education
    • Dr. Melinda Maddox
    • State Educational Technology
    • Director
    • Alabama Department of Education
    • Mr. Bruce Umpstead
    • State Director for Educational
    • Technology & Data Coordination
    • Michigan Department of Education
  • 12. New Education Models Scaling Up Success
  • 13. Transformational Model Traditional Online IVC Blended Personalized Instruction
  • 14. Changing Teaching “ For me, ACCESS Distance Learning has created a new enthusiasm for teaching. I have learned many new things just by being an ACCESS teacher that carry over to my face-to-face students. They have benefited from my teaching in ways that they will never know.” - Debbie Pate, Teacher
  • 15. Shareable Digital Content
  • 16. Virtual Fieldtrips ACCESS Program at Muscle Shoals HS and FAME Studio Photo Credit: Matt Mckean As part of the ACCESS Distance Learning program, Muscle Shoals students watch via video feed from FAME Recording Studio, as the band Uglistick records a song.
  • 17. Changing Schools “ At Tarrant High School, an inner city school, the superintendent gives credit to ACCESS Distance Learning as being the impetus for school reform. Tarrant began enrolling students in ACCESS courses in the spring of 2006. Since then, the graduation rate of Tarrant High School students has increased 14% (from 66% in 2006 to 80% in 2008); the number of students taking foreign languages has almost tripled; students have more confidence in their ability to be successful in more advanced coursework; and the first AP course in the school’s history has been delivered to its students.”   - Martha Rizzuto, Ph.D., Superintendent, Tarrant City Schools
  • 18. Equity in Education for All Students
  • 19. Scale Up National Magazines Spotlight ACCESS as a National Model
      • T.H.E. Journal
      • “ Alabama on the Wave of the Future”
      • Converge Magazine
      • “ ACCESS, Alabama’s exemplary distance learning initiative, does more than level the playing field for students in Alabama. It establishes a valuable model on which school systems everywhere can do the same .”
      • eSchoolNews
      • “ ACCESS has become a catalyst for educational progress .”
      • Fox News – The Fox Report
      • “ . . . trailblazer in the future of distance learning”
      • The Economist
      • “ Raising Alabama . . . Several years ago fewer than half of Alabama’s public
      • high schools offered any college-level Advanced Placement (AP) courses. As
      • of this summer (2009), they all will.”
  • 20. Transformational Model Title II-D Enhancing Education Through Technology (EETT) School Improvement Federal Grants Title I eRate State Funds Partnerships Traditional Online IVC Blended Personalized Instruction
  • 21. Helping Students “ I am a senior this year; however, without these online classes I would not be . . . I have learned more this year in English than I have in all of my previous years combined. ACCESS Distance Learning classes have very effective ways of teaching. They teach you responsibility and teach you to rely on yourself to get your work done right. Personally, I think these classes are one of the best things to ever happen to the Alabama School System. I wanted to personally thank you for making the opportunity for this class possible.” -Aaron Craig, Student
  • 22. Helping Students “ I just wanted to let you know that my AP score came in today, and I made a 5! I could not believe it. I am not nervous at all right now about Calculus in college . I really am grateful that I was privileged enough to have this online teacher. ” -Aarika Boggs, Student
  • 23. Helping Students “ I just wanted to talk about how ACCESS Distance Learning saved my life . In the fall of 2008 I was eighteen years old and considered an eleventh grader. I was in an eleventh grade homeroom because I couldn’t pass 9 th grade English and got behind when I failed it two times. You can say I was in big trouble trying to graduate. Then my counselor told me about ACCESS. In ACCESS I started taking English 11 & 12. When I passed eleventh grade English, I realized that I could graduate so I started to buckle down and do my work. Yes, it was a lot of work, but I knew what I had to do. Now I have passed all of the graduation exams. Now I can be a part of the 2009 graduating class as we walk across that stage for our diplomas. I am happy to graduate now and proud of myself for what I have done.”   David Martinez, Student
  • 24. Today’s Presenters
    • Mr. Lan Neugent
    • Assistant Superintendent for
    • Technology, Career and Adult
    • Education
    • Virginia Department of Education
    • Dr. Melinda Maddox
    • State Educational Technology Director
    • Alabama Department of Education
    • Mr. Bruce Umpstead
    • State Director for Educational
    • Technology & Data Coordination
    • Michigan Department of Education
  • 25. Using Data for Instructional Decision Making
  • 26. Regional Data Initiatives
  • 27. Michigan’s Dropout Challenge 15.1% 14.19% 11.33% 21,185 20,594 16,124
  • 28. Michigan’s Dropout Challenge 15.1% 14.19% 11.33% 8.6% 9.4% 12.4% 21,185 20,594 16,124 17,604 13,551 12,013 33,198 (23.7%) 34,145 (23.5%) 33,728 (23.7%)
  • 29.  
  • 30. EETT (ESEA Title IID): Innovation Through State Leadership
    • National Report and Summary Brochure
    • Individual State Profiles
    • State Examples
    • www.setda.org
  • 31. ESEA Title IID (EETT): The Current Status
    • Major coalition seeking:
    • FY11 Appropriation: $500M for EETT in FY11
    • ESEA Reauthorization: Dedicated program, plus meaningful integration across all titles.
  • 32. Fostering Excellence, Equity and Innovation through Technology Questions?
  • 33. Fostering Excellence, Equity and Innovation through Technology (ESEA Title IID) May 17, 2010 State Educational Technology Directors Association www.setda.org www.twitter.com/setda