Ccsso Setda Edtech Fnl
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  • President Obama has said, The future belongs to the nation that best educates its people."
  • The first major priority of the office has been to manage the update of the National Education Technology plan. SRI was contracted back in the Spring and as you know Dr. Barbara Means has been leading a technical working group. Dr. Linda Roberts has been a consultant on the project. The process has been both rigorous and inclusive. Technical Working Group of 15 leading researchers and educators Series of events through which input was collected NECC 2009 Leadership Symposium and focus groups Public web site open from September through November at edtechfuture.org to collect ideas and examples from the field.
  • The National Education Technology Plan will be available publicly in draft form in early March. It will articulate a transformative agenda on the use of technology for creating the best possible learning environment for this generation of students. It will provide a framework for how technology is critical for addressing the four assurances and create a vision of the opportunities available when technology is intelligently deployed. The Vision: The vision is of a transformed education system offering students and teachers 24/7 access to digital content and powerful tools for communication, collaboration, research, data analysis and for the maintenance of personalized learning records. It promotes permeable boundaries between the many different organizations providing learning experiences and resources in and out of school. The plan will address policy implications such as Internet safety and appropriate privacy safeguards as well as a framework for a modern R&D agenda. More detail: This plan is organized around five themes: Learning - Technology increases the opportunity for learning. (eg. complex math and science concepts come to life through simulations and video, accessibility technologies help students with disabilities and different learning preferences etc.) Teaching - Teachers can engage their students and differentiate learning when students have ubiquitous access to a technology rich environment. Teaching happens in many ways and places and the plan will address the integration of teaching in all parts of a student's life and create the opportunity for an effective teacher(s) for every student. Assessment - A forward-looking assessment system is able to extract information about students’ understanding and learning needs based on what they do during instruction and then summarize that information in a form that supports decision making at the level of the student, the classroom teacher, the school administrator and higher levels of the education system. Combined with a commitment to continuous improvement processes, better assessments could hold the key to dramatically improving education. Infrastructure - All students and teachers will have access to broadband Internet and a digital learning device both in school and out of school. Distribution and storage systems (including cloud computing) and new configurations of learning environments (cognitive tutors, telementors, virtual courses and classrooms, open education resources, and others yet to be invented) will contribute to improved education outcomes , efficiency and cost savings. Productivity - All of this will lead to increased efficiency with the big goal of realizing President Obama’s vision of getting way more students to graduate and go on to postsecondary education.
  • The plan starts with learning. The model of 21st century learning described in this plan puts students at the center and empowers them to take control of their learning. The model asks that we change what and how we teach to match what people need to know, how they learn, where and when they will learn, and who needs to learn. It calls for bringing state-of-the art technology into learning in meaningful ways to engage, motivate, and inspire students to achieve.
  • The plan starts with learning. The model of 21st century learning described in this plan puts students at the center and empowers them to take control of their learning. The model asks that we change what and how we teach to match what people need to know, how they learn, where and when they will learn, and who needs to learn. It calls for bringing state-of-the art technology into learning in meaningful ways to engage, motivate, and inspire students to achieve.
  • The sciences, technology, and assessment theory provide a strong foundation for much-needed improvements in assessment. These include new and better ways to measure what matters, diagnose strengths and weaknesses in the course of learning when there is still time to improve student performance, and involve multiple stakeholders in the process of designing, conducting, and using assessment. This plan looks to technology-based assessment to provide data to drive decisions on the basis of what is best for each and every student, and that in aggregate will lead to continuous improvement across our entire education system.
  • The plan starts with learning. The model of 21st century learning described in this plan puts students at the center and empowers them to take control of their learning. The model asks that we change what and how we teach to match what people need to know, how they learn, where and when they will learn, and who needs to learn. It calls for bringing state-of-the art technology into learning in meaningful ways to engage, motivate, and inspire students to achieve.
  • The plan starts with learning. The model of 21st century learning described in this plan puts students at the center and empowers them to take control of their learning. The model asks that we change what and how we teach to match what people need to know, how they learn, where and when they will learn, and who needs to learn. It calls for bringing state-of-the art technology into learning in meaningful ways to engage, motivate, and inspire students to achieve.
  • A comprehensive infrastructure for learning that provides every student, educator and level of our education system with the resources they need is necessary to transform our education system. Its essential underlying principle is that infrastructure includes people, processes, learning resources, and policies, and sustainable models for continuous improvement in addition to broadband connectivity, servers, software, management systems, and administration tools. Building such an infrastructure is a far-reaching project that will demand concerted and coordinated effort to achieve.
  • The plan starts with learning. The model of 21st century learning described in this plan puts students at the center and empowers them to take control of their learning. The model asks that we change what and how we teach to match what people need to know, how they learn, where and when they will learn, and who needs to learn. It calls for bringing state-of-the art technology into learning in meaningful ways to engage, motivate, and inspire students to achieve.
  • While investment in education is important to transforming education, tight economic times and basic fiscal responsibility demand that we get more out of each dollar we spend. We must be clear about the learning outcomes we expect from the investments we make. We must leverage technology to plan, manage, monitor, and report spending to provide decision-makers with a reliable, accurate, and complete view of the financial performance of our education system at all levels. Such visibility is essential to our commitment to continuous improvement, and our ability to continually measure and improve the productivity of our education system to meet our goals for educational attainment within the budgets we can afford.
  • The plan starts with learning. The model of 21st century learning described in this plan puts students at the center and empowers them to take control of their learning. The model asks that we change what and how we teach to match what people need to know, how they learn, where and when they will learn, and who needs to learn. It calls for bringing state-of-the art technology into learning in meaningful ways to engage, motivate, and inspire students to achieve.
  • The NETP is living document, not a static plan. It will be available on a website for all education stakeholders and the public to comment and contribute examples, case studies, and personal or group statements.
  • The plan starts with learning. The model of 21st century learning described in this plan puts students at the center and empowers them to take control of their learning. The model asks that we change what and how we teach to match what people need to know, how they learn, where and when they will learn, and who needs to learn. It calls for bringing state-of-the art technology into learning in meaningful ways to engage, motivate, and inspire students to achieve.
  • The NETP is living document, not a static plan. It will be available on a website for all education stakeholders and the public to comment and contribute examples, case studies, and personal or group statements.
  • Last year, McKinsey and Company issued a report called “The Economic Impact of the Achievement Gap in America’s Schools.” McKinsey found that the U.S. lags significantly behind other advanced nations in educational performance and is slipping further behind in math, science and literacy. The report offered startling estimates about the economic impact of this slide, stating that if we had been able to close the international achievement gap over the last 25 years, the U.S. GDP in 2008 would have been $1-2 trillion dollars higher – that’s between 9 and 16 percent of GDP. McKinsey stated that our failure to close these gaps has meant "the economic equivalent of a permanent national recession."
  • The NETP is living document, not a static plan. It will be available on a website for all education stakeholders and the public to comment and contribute examples, case studies, and personal or group statements.
  • Voiceover: Online instruction pilots have produced similar or better outcomes with more than 2X the course completion rate and half the effort/hours Other points: 70% of school districts consider distance learning important for delivering courses Students at Florida Virtual Schools outscored the state assessment average by more than 15 percentage points
  • Voiceover: A: Inadequate speeds and poor infrastructure are common complaints; bandwidth demands continue to rise B: Limited supply of digital content and online learning systems; regulatory barriers; lack of digital literacy skills C: Data is not being used to meet student needs, drive decision-making, or enable research on what works

Ccsso Setda Edtech Fnl Presentation Transcript

  • 1. K-12 EDUCATIONAL TECHNOLOGY
    • A Future Look at Policy and Practice
  • 2. Welcome
    • Susan Gendron
      • President, Council of Chief State School Officers (CCSSO)
      • Maine Commissioner of Education
    • Jeff Mao
      • Vice Chair, State Educational Technology Directors Association (SETDA)
      • Maine Learning Technology Policy Director
  • 3. Maine: A New Motto
    • A personal digital device,
      • at the point of learning,
        • as defined by the learner.
  • 4. Maine Education Technology & Broadband
  • 5. A View from the States
    • Douglas Levin
      • Executive Director, SETDA
  • 6. State Educational Technology Trends Vision, Leadership, Policies, Funding Technology Infrastructure Data and Accountability
  • 7. Featured Presenters
    • Karen Cator
      • Director of Education Technology
      • Office of the Secretary, U.S. Department of Education
    • Steve Midgley
      • Education Director, Omnibus Broadband Initiative
      • Office of Strategic Planning, Federal Communications Commission
  • 8. Karen Cator Director, Office of Education Technology US Department of Education March 2010
  • 9. “ By 2020, America will once again have the highest proportion of college graduates in the world.” President Obama
  • 10. Process
  • 11. How the Plan Was Developed 12 federal policymakers 15 experts on Technical Working Group 17 events and focus groups 50 chief technology officers 24 industry leaders 48 school administrators 123 college instructors 235 classroom teachers 153 technology providers 572 reports, examples, and statements contributed to the web site 22,876 users of public Web site
  • 12. Interagency Connections
    • NSF - The Cyberlearning Challenge and Opportunity
    • FCC - Broadband Plan (Commerce and Agriculture)
    • OSTP - Health, Energy and Education
    • DOD - Interoperability and R&D
  • 13. Content
  • 14. Key Elements of the Plan
    • Five goals - for 21st Century model of learning
    • Recommendations - actions for states, districts,
    • federal government and other stakeholders
    • Grand Challenges - high risk/high gain research and
    • development addressing invention
  • 15. The Five Goals Productivity Teaching Infrastructure Learning Assessment
  • 16. Learning
    • Increase the opportunity for learning by enabling unprecedented access to high quality learning experiences for all students. Create new ways of understanding what types of learning experiences work - when, how and with whom?
  • 17. Learning
    • Goal 1.0 All learners will have engaging and empowering learning experiences both in and outside of school that prepare them to be active, creative, knowledgeable, and ethical participants in our globally networked society.
  • 18. Assessment
    • We can measure what matters and provide closer to real time feedback with new technology enabled assessments that are embedded in classroom instruction. Students with parents and faculty can manage a persistent learning record, enabling continuous improvement at all levels.
  • 19. Assessment Goal 2.0 Our education system at all levels will leverage the power of technology to measure what matters and use assessment data for continuous improvement.
  • 20. Teaching
    • Teachers need to be highly connected with data, experts, professional teams, and resources in order to provide personalized learning. Online environments can ensure that every student has access to effective teaching.
  • 21. Teaching Goal 3: Professional educators will be supported individually and in teams by technology that connects them to data, content, resources, expertise, and learning experiences that can empower and inspire them to provide more effective teaching for all learners.
  • 22. Infrastructure
    • Students and teachers need 24/7 access to the modern tools and resources they need to do their work.
    National Education Technology Plan
  • 23. Infrastructure Goal 4.0: All students and educators will have access to a comprehensive infrastructure for learning when and where they need it.
  • 24. Productivity
    • In order to get more students over a higher bar, we need to increase the efficiency of the system and maximize productivity.
  • 25. Productivity Goal Goal 5.0 Our education system at all levels will redesign processes and structures to take advantage of the power of technology to improve learning outcomes while making more efficient use of time, money, and staff.
  • 26. Research and Development
  • 27. Grand Challenges 1.0: Design and validate an integrated system that provides real-time access to learning experiences tuned to the levels of difficulty and assistance that optimize learning for all learners, and that incorporates self-improving features that enable it to become increasingly effective through interaction with learners. 2.0: Design and validate an integrated system for designing and implementing valid, reliable, and cost-effective assessments of complex aspects of 21st century expertise and competencies across academic disciplines. 3.0: Design and validate an integrated approach for capturing, aggregating, mining, and sharing content, student learning, and financial data cost-effectively for multiple purposes across many learning platforms and data systems in near real time. 4.0: Identify and validate design principles for efficient and effective online learning systems and combined online and offline learning systems that produce content expertise and competencies equal to or better than those produced by the best conventional instruction in half the time at half the cost.
  • 28. Open Government
  • 29. “ I can't create my future with the tools from your past.” – Middle school student Second Life Session
  • 30. www.ed.gov/technology
  • 31. National Broadband Plan March 10 th 2010 Presentation to CCSSO-SETDA Steve Midgley Director of Education FCC [email_address]
  • 32. As a platform for information exchange, broadband helps personalize instruction so students learn more Source: National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) and NASA; John Lang; Hubert Lee Education
  • 33. Online instruction pilots reveal significant opportunity to advance achievement 0 Sources: Carnegie Mellon, Open Learning Initiative, Lovett et al., and Joel Smith testimony to FCC, Florida Tax Watch * *% *% * *% *% * *% *% * * Comparison of results between traditional and hybrid instruction models Percentages Comparison of Advanced Placement scores at Florida Virtual School and traditional instructional models Advanced Placement Scores, 1-5 Scale Education
  • 34. Gaps prevent education from taking full advantage of broadband Gaps Issues Education Insufficient connectivity
    • School and classroom bandwidth demands to rise dramatically over the next few years
    • 16% of public community college campuses have high speed broadband v. 91% of research universities
    Limited data access & lack of transparency
    • Only 37% of teachers have electronic access to achievement data for their students
    • Data integration is one of the most challenging problems facing schools
    Limitations on online learning systems and content
    • Regulations inhibit online learning: teachers often cannot teach across state lines; course accreditation is often based on “seat time”, not outcomes
    • Limited supply of high quality online learning systems and digital content
    • Limited digital literacy skills among teachers and students
    Source: Educause, US Department of Education
  • 35. Framework for recommendations Upgrading E-rate Unlocking the power of data to personalize learning and improve decision-making Supporting and promoting online learning 1 2 3 Education
  • 36. Upgrading E-rate, 1
    • Increase flexibility and bandwidth
      • Permit off-hours community use
      • Set goals for minimum school and library connectivity
      • Support more flexibility in infrastructure development
        • Including limited support for dark fiber and owned infrastructure
      • Support more internal connections
    • Improve program efficiency
      • Streamline application process
        • “ 1040 EZ” for simpler applications
        • Simplify multi-year renewals
      • Improve cost efficiency and data collection
        • Better analytics, improved surveys
      • Index cap to inflation
    Education 1
  • 37. Upgrading E-rate, 2
    • Foster innovation with pilot programs
      • Support wireless connectivity to devices on and off-campus
        • Begin laying a path towards the future of “anytime anywhere” education.
      • Award some funds competitively
        • Recognizing and rewarding the best ideas
    • Improve connectivity of community colleges
      • As a critical source of job training and workforce development, high speed online access is key
    Education 1
  • 38. Supporting and promoting online learning, 1
    • Increase supply of digital content
      • Develop standards for government-generated content
      • Make federal content digital
      • Simplify copyright regime to encourage contributions
        • Update TEACH Act
        • New educational notice/symbol
        • Improve orphaned work handling
    • Promote digital literacy
      • Support standards for digital skills
        • Media skills, communication, analysis and technology
      • Fund integration of digital literacy and STEM into curriculum
        • Digital literacy should be embedded across subjects
    Education 2
  • 39. Supporting and promoting online learning, 2
    • Expand online learning solutions
      • Remove regulatory barriers
        • Teacher accreditation harmonization across state lines
        • Course accreditation for online learning via “capability” or “mastery” rather than seat-time
      • Fund research & development and investment
        • Sustained, multi-year investments in R&D
      • Consider open license as option for federal investments
    Education 2
  • 40. Unlocking the power of data to personalize learning and improve decision-making
    • Foster adoption of Electronic Educational Records
    • Develop standards for financial data transparency
    • Create an online RFP broadcast service to increase market information
    Education 3
  • 41. Key Concepts for National Broadband Plan & Education Broadband can… … Provide new forms of individualized content and resources … Increase data availability, increase market transparency … Provide systems platform to support teaching and learning … Provide access to new, higher bandwidth online solutions
    • Online & distance learning systems
    • Online communities
    • Innovation strategies
    • Digital resource repositories
    • Online textbooks
    • Content sharing and peer production
    • Electronic Education Records standards
    • Increase market interoperability
    • Financial data standards
    • ERate upgrade
    • Community Colleges
    Online Learning Digital Content Data Standards/ Interoperability Broadband Infrastructure
  • 42. Question and Answer
    • Moderated by:
      • Douglas Levin, Executive Director, SETDA
  • 43. Synthesis and Closing Remarks
    • Susan Gendron
      • President, Council of Chief State School Officers (CCSSO)
      • Maine Commissioner of Education
  • 44. State of Maine and Federal Partnerships
    • American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA)
      • MLTI 1:1 high school expansion, 65 new 1:1 high schools
    • Title IID ARRA
      • Innovation with Open Education Resources (OER)
  • 45. K12 EDUCATION TECHNOLOGY
    • A Future Look at Policy and Practice
    THANK YOU!